Food & Drink

How to make tender Chinese beef?

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  • Mar 13th, 2007 5:29 pm
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Sep 8, 2005
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Scarborough

How to make tender Chinese beef?

I can't really afford the expensive cuts of beef, but then neither can the stores in the foodcourts. But the beef in the Chinese Ho-fun is usually so tender. What cut of beef do they use and how do they get the slices so tender? And how do they cut it so thin? Do they cut it while it's frozen?

I buy beef from T&T usually ...but if NoFrills beef is ok, then please let me know what to ask for.
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Aug 31, 2005
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They use baking soda as a tenderizer but I think it makes the beef taste funny. Marinate well and maybe pound it out with plastic wrap and a mallet.
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Apr 4, 2003
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Oakville
No, not baking soda! They use corn starch and it's tenderized.
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Jun 15, 2004
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Toronto
Anessa wrote:
Mar 11th, 2007 10:51 pm
They use baking soda as a tenderizer but I think it makes the beef taste funny. Marinate well and maybe pound it out with plastic wrap and a mallet.
wow... apparently you are a cooking expert as well as a media fanatic!

I believe the beef in ho fun can potentially be brisket.
Not sure exactly what type of "beef" is in the ho fun you order though but the soft ones that are usually attached to some fat are brisket.

"LAHM" is kinda the chinese way of saying it.....


otherwise marinade usually works... and of course never NEVER overcook your beef.... and potentially you may need to slow cook it depending on what you are making....
im' sure you can find it in some online chinese recipe book
Newbie
Dec 20, 2005
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put slices of kiwi in the beef and marinate over a day. (this is korean stylez). this softens the meat (good for bbq meat).
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Jun 26, 2005
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My mom always tells me those tenderized Chinese style beef is bad for your health.

Not sure if she is correct, but I tend to agree.
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Dec 13, 2005
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the cut in your typical chinese beef dish is called "FLANK"

and yes they normally do use baking soda to tenderize it in the restaurants, however its been argued that its not all that healthy for you...

to cut flank properly u must cut against the grain in a diagonal angle IE...

\\\\\\\\

therefore you are cutting away at the connective tissue which makes the cut of meat tough

enjoy






HEATWARE

WTFBBQZOR?!! :confused:
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May 4, 2004
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fishcurry wrote:
Mar 12th, 2007 12:08 am
put slices of kiwi in the beef and marinate over a day. (this is korean stylez). this softens the meat (good for bbq meat).
Slices of Kiwi? How many kiwi for 1lb of beef? Do you need to smush it?
What kind of beef Korean used for BBQ??

Why baking soda is bad for your health??
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Dec 13, 2005
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well i dont know how many slices but im assuming you should put enough kiwi to cover your beef im not even sure if htey use kiwi lol its kinda interesting i might wanna try it myself and to answer your baking soda question i dont know lol its just what my mother told me too :confused:






HEATWARE

WTFBBQZOR?!! :confused:
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Jan 16, 2006
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WhYSoSuK wrote:
Mar 12th, 2007 12:54 am
the cut in your typical chinese beef dish is called "FLANK"

and yes they normally do use baking soda to tenderize it in the restaurants, however its been argued that its not all that healthy for you...

to cut flank properly u must cut against the grain in a diagonal angle IE...

\\\\\\\\

therefore you are cutting away at the connective tissue which makes the cut of meat tough

enjoy
good tip on cutting against the grain .. although this method should be used for any type/cut of meat .. i don't know anyone who likes their meat tougher than it can be .. unless were talking jerky :lol:

flank or outside round should do the trick. it' easier to slice the meat when it is cold. marinate with conrstarch and some soy sauce for 15-20 min and cook in a very hot pan
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Jun 7, 2001
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One more tip about cutting flank steak is to put the meat in the freezer for awhile to make it easier to cut. Soft flank steak is typically messy.

Dave
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Aug 31, 2005
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kid_icarus wrote:
Mar 11th, 2007 11:59 pm
wow... apparently you are a cooking expert as well as a media fanatic!

I believe the beef in ho fun can potentially be brisket.
Not sure exactly what type of "beef" is in the ho fun you order though but the soft ones that are usually attached to some fat are brisket.

"LAHM" is kinda the chinese way of saying it.....


otherwise marinade usually works... and of course never NEVER overcook your beef.... and potentially you may need to slow cook it depending on what you are making....
im' sure you can find it in some online chinese recipe book
And apparently you're just one annoying stalker. FYI, I'm also a sports and deals fanatic. You gonna come find me there too?
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May 12, 2004
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it's also how you slice the beef. Cutting against the grain makes it more tender.
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Dec 22, 2005
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http://frugalliving.about.com/od/baking ... ooking.htm

"Most Asian restaurants tenderize their less tender cuts of beef and pork with baking soda. It can be applied several ways. Mix baking soda and water and let the meat soak in it for several hours in the refrigerator. Later, rinse the meat thoroughly to get rid of the soda residue. The meat will be very tender. You can also sprinkle baking soda directly on the meat. Let it set for several hours in the refrigerator, then rinse the meat thoroughly."

The article mentions another interesting use for baking soda :lol:

"Put a tablespoon of baking soda in a large pot of beans while soaking them, the flatulence caused by beans is kept to a minimum."
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