Green / Eco-Friendly

How many KWh do you use in a day?

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 19th, 2017 4:52 pm
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Sr. Member
May 3, 2005
909 posts
47 upvotes
Woodbridge
ChubChub wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 11:26 am
You should buy a kill-a-watt; anything that plugs in, you can test. Might surprise you to find out your coffee maker is continuously drawing 100w, or your printer is consuming 40w just sitting there.
I've got one. I've been plugging it in to various things to see what the usage is. Discovered that the steam humidifier uses up 1200w every time it's on so that's one of the things causing high usage but not much that I can do about it for now.

Lobo
Sr. Member
Nov 17, 2012
749 posts
246 upvotes
Toronto
FWIW my hot tub is a 120v 15A plug-in model. It's not one of those inflatable / foam things.

The heat from the pump is what warms the water. Runs easy at 104 degrees, but it takes a while to warm up (1 degree / hour). So yeah, when it runs, it runs.

With rates having gone up and up and up (and we have since bought a cottage) chances are we'll sell it but it does get used in the winter.

I'll plug the killawatt back in and see if I can get a reading over the next week or so. The display on the device has gotten a little wonky so I might need to buy another.
Penalty Box
Feb 9, 2006
6840 posts
1174 upvotes
Brampton
lobo wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 11:11 am
We're a family of four (two kids aged 11 & 14) living in a 2800 sq ft detached home built in 1985. Furnace is 10 years old and HE with an ECM motor (from what I recall). I run the fan in circ mode which seems to help the house with warmer overall. Washer and dryer are 11 years old. New frig and gas stove installed a few years ago. Our usage is unbelievable. We're typically in the top 10% in our neighbourhood according to Powerstream's page and I honestly don't know what else I can do to reduce our usage. This month we were at 1317kwh and last month was 1467kwh. Warmer months are typically better but still doing 800-900kwh per month. The basement is unfinished and it is a bit cold so not sure if there's leakage there or just not insulated very well. I guess once we finish it we will see if it makes any difference.

Lobo
A furnace of that vintage, I'm willing to bet it's not ECM, it's likely multi speed PSC or constant Torque PSC but I bet it's not ECM. Which would explain your power consumption, your levels are typical for someone who uses a PSC motor 24/7

Not saying a 10 year old furnace wouldn't have ECM but if your furnace is single stage its definitely PSC. ECMs were found on variable gas valve models which were rare to have back then. Even multi-stage models of that vintage didn't typically have them, they typically used Constant Torque PSC.
Sr. Member
May 3, 2005
909 posts
47 upvotes
Woodbridge
tebore wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 12:44 pm
A furnace of that vintage, I'm willing to bet it's not ECM, it's likely multi speed PSC or constant Torque PSC but I bet it's not ECM. Which would explain your power consumption, your levels are typical for someone who uses a PSC motor 24/7

Not saying a 10 year old furnace wouldn't have ECM but if your furnace is single stage its definitely PSC. ECMs were found on variable gas valve models which were rare to have back then. Even multi-stage models of that vintage didn't typically have them, they typically used Constant Torque PSC.
Oh? If I were to lookup and post the model, would we be able to determine for sure? I know it has different speeds as sometimes it kicks in with a lower speed and then later it may go faster and you can definitely feel it. My furnace does connect to an AC plug nearby and I don't see any other electrical cable going to the fuse box other than the switch dedicated for it.
Penalty Box
Feb 9, 2006
6840 posts
1174 upvotes
Brampton
lobo wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 1:35 pm
Oh? If I were to lookup and post the model, would we be able to determine for sure? I know it has different speeds as sometimes it kicks in with a lower speed and then later it may go faster and you can definitely feel it. My furnace does connect to an AC plug nearby and I don't see any other electrical cable going to the fuse box other than the switch dedicated for it.
Checking the model you'd be able to find out. Like I said it might just be a multispeed PSC with Constant Torque that was more common back then.
Sr. Member
May 3, 2005
909 posts
47 upvotes
Woodbridge
I think you're right. It's a Trane XV90 and the invoice shows it as a dc motor multi stage but online it just mentions variable speed so likely PSC as you mentioned. So if I've got the fan running in circ mode, that's definitely contributing to my increase in hydro vs leaving it to come on only when heat is needed. Sucks cause I've read that since I've also got a whole home air cleaner attached to the furnace, it's better to run the fan more often than just waiting for when it's called for.
Penalty Box
Feb 9, 2006
6840 posts
1174 upvotes
Brampton
lobo wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 2:40 pm
I think you're right. It's a Trane XV90 and the invoice shows it as a dc motor multi stage but online it just mentions variable speed so likely PSC as you mentioned. So if I've got the fan running in circ mode, that's definitely contributing to my increase in hydro vs leaving it to come on only when heat is needed. Sucks cause I've read that since I've also got a whole home air cleaner attached to the furnace, it's better to run the fan more often than just waiting for when it's called for.
No no you were right, it's an ECM.

However not all ECMs are set up the same way. I'm not familiar with the board on the Trane XV90 but some have a special CONT or CIRC mode (usually via a jumper) that drops the constant fan speed way down (Lower than the Low) so it's barely drawing any power. Mine is set up this way. It's different than setting your Thermostat to FAN ON as this usually sets the fan to HIGH (The AC setting) which means you could still be drawing 300-400w vs <100W.
Deal Guru
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Feb 8, 2014
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bubuski wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 8:56 am
Yeah, little loads all add up. Cable boxes for example....The Rogers Nextbox 3 consumes 25W when on and 23W when off.
23W x 6boxes = 138W
(138W x 24hrs)/1000 = 3.31KWh per day OR 99kWh per month.
Thats insane, if your subtract my heat/AC/dehumidifier i can live on 100kWh/month. If i had a more efficient fridge i could do even better.
lobo wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 11:11 am
We're a family of four (two kids aged 11 & 14) living in a 2800 sq ft detached home built in 1985. Furnace is 10 years old and HE with an ECM motor (from what I recall). I run the fan in circ mode which seems to help the house with warmer overall. Washer and dryer are 11 years old. New frig and gas stove installed a few years ago. Our usage is unbelievable. We're typically in the top 10% in our neighbourhood according to Powerstream's page and I honestly don't know what else I can do to reduce our usage.
Unless your meter is crossed with someone else your using all that power, and you can audit it to find out where. You will be surprised how much juice is going where. As mentioned that recirc mode could be killing you. Get a whole house meter to test it, or if you have real time or hourly numbers from your power company use that.
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
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Dec 27, 2011
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ChubChub wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 11:26 am
You should buy a kill-a-watt; anything that plugs in, you can test. Might surprise you to find out your coffee maker is continuously drawing 100w, or your printer is consuming 40w just sitting there.
Am I doing this calculation correct?
For a printer using 40w, that's 40w x 24 hours = 960w.
960w/1000= 0.96kwh per day.

So essentially just having a printer plugged in doing nothing will consume 1kwh per day?
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Feb 8, 2014
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crystallight wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:44 pm
Am I doing this calculation correct?
For a printer using 40w, that's 40w x 24 hours = 960w.
960w/1000= 0.96kwh per day.

So essentially just having a printer plugged in doing nothing will consume 1kwh per day?
Your correct but every printer is different, mine in idle uses under 1W. It also makes little sense to leave this bad model printer turned on all day everyday unless your printing 24/7, turn this energy hog off when its not in use.
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
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May 23, 2009
1386 posts
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Mississauga
crystallight wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:44 pm
Am I doing this calculation correct?
For a printer using 40w, that's 40w x 24 hours = 960w.
960w/1000= 0.96kwh per day.

So essentially just having a printer plugged in doing nothing will consume 1kwh per day?
As Quentin5 mentioned the calculation is correct but most printers have a much lower idle state and wont necessary pull 40W for 24 hrs periods.

Apart from the cable boxes I mentioned above, network devices that broadcast are another source of small power consumption that add up since they always have to be in a ready state.
Cable modems, multiple antenna routers, NAS, wi-fi repeaters will each pull around 5-10W at idle but doubling when processing traffic.
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Dec 27, 2011
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Quentin5 wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:50 pm
Your correct but every printer is different, mine in idle uses under 1W. It also makes little sense to leave this bad model printer turned on all day everyday unless your printing 24/7, turn this energy hog off when its not in use.
Ah, I just assumed he meant the printer was plugged in 24/7 but still turned off (aside from the times it's actually needed).
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Oct 9, 2010
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Windsor
crystallight wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:44 pm
Am I doing this calculation correct?
For a printer using 40w, that's 40w x 24 hours = 960w.
960w/1000= 0.96kwh per day.

So essentially just having a printer plugged in doing nothing will consume 1kwh per day?
It was hypothetical, but the calculation is correct.
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Feb 8, 2014
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bubuski wrote:
Mar 17th, 2017 9:27 am
As Quentin5 mentioned the calculation is correct but most printers have a much lower idle state and wont necessary pull 40W for 24 hrs periods.

Apart from the cable boxes I mentioned above, network devices that broadcast are another source of small power consumption that add up since they always have to be in a ready state.
Cable modems, multiple antenna routers, NAS, wi-fi repeaters will each pull around 5-10W at idle but doubling when processing traffic.
Very true, when using a kill a watt test everything that plugs in, no matter ho big or small. Also for intermittent use devices test over time, a fridge for a week for example.
Lies, damned lies, statistics and alternative facts
Sr. Member
May 3, 2005
909 posts
47 upvotes
Woodbridge
Agree with the above statement. While I've been busy measuring everything that's plugged in in my house, I was shocked (hehehe) to find out that my subwoofer pulls 27w just sitting idle or even switched off! When in use it has gone as high as 150w for loud bass heavy scenes. Even the electric toothbrushes and water pick will suck 2w just sitting there doing nothing.
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