Green / Eco-Friendly

How many KWh do you use in a day?

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 10th, 2018 5:13 am
Tags:
None
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
7465 posts
5753 upvotes
Oakville
crystallight wrote:
Mar 4th, 2018 2:21 pm
Random question. I leave several phone chargers plugged into the wall throughout the house (bedroom, living room, basement) so that it's very convenient if I need to charge my phone. So for most of the day, there are three chargers plugged into the wall socket but no actual phone being charged. When there's no phone attached on the other end, does the charger still consume electricity (even a little)?
From what I've read, some do and some don't. A good indication is if it gets any warmer than room temp.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2006
9100 posts
3025 upvotes
Brampton
engineered wrote:
Mar 4th, 2018 3:02 pm
From what I've read, some do and some don't. A good indication is if it gets any warmer than room temp.
Energy Star ones consume negligible amounts of power. But all of them do consume some amount.

The iPhone charger for example is pretty bad and isn't energy Star compliant.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-much-p ... ger-waste/
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
14785 posts
4172 upvotes
crystallight wrote:
Mar 4th, 2018 2:21 pm
Random question. I leave several phone chargers plugged into the wall throughout the house (bedroom, living room, basement) so that it's very convenient if I need to charge my phone. So for most of the day, there are three chargers plugged into the wall socket but no actual phone being charged. When there's no phone attached on the other end, does the charger still consume electricity (even a little)?
Yes, they will all have a phantom load because they are converting power from 120V AC to 5VDC for use as soon as you plug something into it. That said the amount of that phantom load will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer (design to design), it could be less then 1 watt, it could be several watts. A few years back the EPA started the 1W initiative because some appliances have a huge phantom load, i believe some cable boxes use more power turned off then turned on (hours off vs on and little load differences). I read an analysis years ago that something like 15% of power bills was phantom loads (energy used when items are turned off). My old CRT TV used 6W when turned off, this energy was likely being used to wait for a turn on signal from the remote.
There is a device called a kill a watt that you can plug anything into, leave it a while and measure the phantom load. The ones that measure a fraction of a watt (newer models) are best because they are more exact, though for non continuous loads you would want to leave items plugged in a while and measure (say fridges, computer hardware, etc). For example my wireless router uses a hair over 3W or about 85Wh a day or 2.6kWh/month. If your USB plugs use 1W that would equal 0.732kWh/month, it may use more or it may use less. If it used 0.25W when idle for example that would be 0.183kWh/month, a small number.
The beatings will continue until morale improves
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 19, 2004
7844 posts
1221 upvotes
Cambridge, ON
Most newer chargers use much less then 1 watt, but yes, all chargers continue to draw power while plugged in. The amount is negligible to a household, but I figure it doesn't take any extra effort to unplug it usually unless you have a hard to reach outlet.

The above poster mentioned a kill a watt which is a good idea, but they don't read loads below 1 watt so you probably won't be able to measure it unless maybe you put all your chargers onto a power bar and try measuring them all.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
7465 posts
5753 upvotes
Oakville
My SmartThings outlets measure power usage. I should check some of my USB chargers.
For instance cable modem uses 6.2W, our espresso maker uses 600w while heating, and 920W while pulling a cup. I had it plugged into the new LG front load washer and I think it peaked around 400W.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
14785 posts
4172 upvotes
don242 wrote:
Mar 4th, 2018 6:39 pm
The above poster mentioned a kill a watt which is a good idea, but they don't read loads below 1 watt so you probably won't be able to measure it unless maybe you put all your chargers onto a power bar and try measuring them all.
They do. The older model only goes down to one watt but used continuously you can divide watts by hours and get fractions. Also newer models can read in 0.1W increments.
Because the question was asked and i have never measured my USB chargers i plugged in my Nexus 4 charger that came with the phone, its under 1W because its saying zero and its an older killawatt, i will leave it plugged in for a few days, not use it to charge the phone at all and report back when i have enough hours to get a reading.
The beatings will continue until morale improves
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
14785 posts
4172 upvotes
To update my last post i tested the charger that came with my Nexus 4 for around 200 hours, it did not get up to 10Wh minimum, suggesting it either uses less wattage then 10Wh in 8 2/3 days or the device i have can't read below a certain threshold.
Now i'm testing an RCA dual charger from an RFD deal a few years back, it reads 0W and 0VA but at 128 hours it has hit 10Wh. So my old model killawatt can read below 1W but how much below i am not sure.

It also shows that some chargers are so low that leaving them plugged in doesn't use enough power to matter, though every charger is different and i am certain some use a lot more power then the ones i tested.

Edit: My RCA charger hit 0.02kWh and 136 hours (could be a bit less, i checked it when i made this post and just now 7 hours later), so that seems to indicate its using about 0.15Wh, which makes 3.5Wh/day or 1.29kWh/year. At 17.5c/kWh (guesstimate of off peak, on peak, plus delivery and variable charges) makes about 23 cents a year in phantom electricity for this one charger.
The beatings will continue until morale improves
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2008
2577 posts
508 upvotes
Oshawa
Usage of Hydro electricity really depends on each household.

The only appliances we have "plugged in" & "ON" that constantly takes power are:
Fridge
Stove (clock is running)
Range Hood (clock is running)
Microwave (clock is running)
Hot Water Boiler
Freezer in Basement
Internet modem (1) and routers (3)
Security System Touchpad
Smart Thermostat
Alarm Clock in Bedroom (2)
Cable Box (clock is running)

We normally cook when we get home ... and it would be in the most cost efficient time of the day ... that's also when we watch TV as well.

Laundry is done on the weekends when rates are cheap. One load on Saturday and another on Sunday (sometimes 2 loads). Winter time, laundry is hung in the basement ... the furnace is closeby so the laundry dries in about 2 days. Summer time, laundry is done first thing in the morning on weekends and hung outside in the backyard on the umbrella clothesline. If it is hot enough, you can do two loads of laundry in one day!

Vacuuming is done on the weekends as well ... why? Because the rates are cheap.

Our handheld cordless vacuum cleaner is charged either on nights or weekends.

Mowing the lawn ... well ... we have an electric lawn mower ... plugged in with a long extension cord. That's a weekend job. Rates are cheap.

Turn on the lights when you need them. Turn them off when you don't.

If you use rechargeable batteries ... charge them on the weekends or weeknights.

If you use an electric toothbrush ... it's NOT necessary to have it charging all day!

Is it necessary to have your coffee maker constantly plugged in? NOPE! Unplug it when you are done with it.

Those that decide to keep their lights on all night long on the outside of the house ... well ... that's a waste of electricity. Try using solar powered lights with a motion sensor instead.

It's NOT about being cheap. It's about SAVING MONEY for something else useful.

Our average use of electricity ranges from a low of 8.19kwh/day to 15.26kwh/day over the past 12 months. The trend is actually lower consumption over the summer months ... we have great natural lighting so we use less of our lights in the summer.

IMG_20180324_153429.jpg
Stress is caused by NOT fishing enough.
JDM ONLY! No North American CRAP!
Megabass, Imakatsu, Jackall, GanCraft, OSP, EverGreen, YGK, Toray, Sunline, Nories, Shimano, Daiwa RULES!
EVA Air Rocks ... Air Canada SUCKS!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 27, 2006
3132 posts
424 upvotes
Not so easy there Ma…
Power consumption chart
http://www.torontohydro.com/sites/elect ... Chart.aspx

Covers the average power consumption of quite a few items used in a household. Taken with a grain of salt as these are deemed average.

Includes average cost per month based on current Ontario time of use rates.
* HST and 8% Provincial Rebate are not included in the calculations.

From the bottom chart Toronto has an additional TOTAL COST $33.73 (fixed charge per 30 days) and a total consumption charge $0.10757 (per kWh)

I'm not a Toronto customer, maybe that $0.10757 (per kWh) is an overall average consumption charge?
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
14785 posts
4172 upvotes
fergy wrote:
Mar 31st, 2018 9:56 am
Power consumption chart
http://www.torontohydro.com/sites/elect ... Chart.aspx

Covers the average power consumption of quite a few items used in a household. Taken with a grain of salt as these are deemed average.

Includes average cost per month based on current Ontario time of use rates.
* HST and 8% Provincial Rebate are not included in the calculations.

From the bottom chart Toronto has an additional TOTAL COST $33.73 (fixed charge per 30 days) and a total consumption charge $0.10757 (per kWh)

I'm not a Toronto customer, maybe that $0.10757 (per kWh) is an overall average consumption charge?
Those numbers are complete junk.

A few examples,
A/C (central) 2.5 tons 3500W
Mine ~1600W

A/C (room) 6,000 BTU 750W
Mine 600W (gave away now that i have central air)

Furnace Fan Motor (Continuous) 350W
Mine ~100W

Clothes Dryer 5000W
Mine ~1500W (i have a heat pump dryer mind you, for most people this would be the only close to accurate number)

Clothes Washer 500W
Mine ~210W

Dishwasher 1300W
Mine ~190W

Fridge 500W
Mine ~100W

One cannot give numbers for appliance usage because they vary so widely, an average is a complete garbage number in this case that would apply to virtually nobody (assuming that is an average) because the standard deviation is huge
The beatings will continue until morale improves
Member
May 6, 2006
265 posts
58 upvotes
Brampton
Good job keeping power consumption down to a minimum.

You might want to add furnace to the list especially the electronic high efficiency ones. Don't know how true this is but my neighbour said there is a small heater in central AC units. During the fall, winter and spring, I leave the AC breaker off.

AV-Fishing wrote:
Mar 24th, 2018 4:14 pm
Usage of Hydro electricity really depends on each household.

The only appliances we have "plugged in" & "ON" that constantly takes power are:
Fridge
Stove (clock is running)
Range Hood (clock is running)
Microwave (clock is running)
Hot Water Boiler
Freezer in Basement
Internet modem (1) and routers (3)
Security System Touchpad
Smart Thermostat
Alarm Clock in Bedroom (2)
Cable Box (clock is running)

We normally cook when we get home ... and it would be in the most cost efficient time of the day ... that's also when we watch TV as well.

Laundry is done on the weekends when rates are cheap. One load on Saturday and another on Sunday (sometimes 2 loads). Winter time, laundry is hung in the basement ... the furnace is closeby so the laundry dries in about 2 days. Summer time, laundry is done first thing in the morning on weekends and hung outside in the backyard on the umbrella clothesline. If it is hot enough, you can do two loads of laundry in one day!

Vacuuming is done on the weekends as well ... why? Because the rates are cheap.

Our handheld cordless vacuum cleaner is charged either on nights or weekends.

Mowing the lawn ... well ... we have an electric lawn mower ... plugged in with a long extension cord. That's a weekend job. Rates are cheap.

Turn on the lights when you need them. Turn them off when you don't.

If you use rechargeable batteries ... charge them on the weekends or weeknights.

If you use an electric toothbrush ... it's NOT necessary to have it charging all day!

Is it necessary to have your coffee maker constantly plugged in? NOPE! Unplug it when you are done with it.

Those that decide to keep their lights on all night long on the outside of the house ... well ... that's a waste of electricity. Try using solar powered lights with a motion sensor instead.

It's NOT about being cheap. It's about SAVING MONEY for something else useful.

Our average use of electricity ranges from a low of 8.19kwh/day to 15.26kwh/day over the past 12 months. The trend is actually lower consumption over the summer months ... we have great natural lighting so we use less of our lights in the summer.


IMG_20180324_153429.jpg
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2008
2577 posts
508 upvotes
Oshawa
gwn wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2018 8:54 pm
Good job keeping power consumption down to a minimum.

You might want to add furnace to the list especially the electronic high efficiency ones. Don't know how true this is but my neighbour said there is a small heater in central AC units. During the fall, winter and spring, I leave the AC breaker off.
That's right. I have the breaker off once the weather gets below 17 degrees in the fall. Pack it up.

I only flip on the breaker when it gets over 25 degrees outside.

I have AMPLE air flow in the house. Even in the summer, if it is 30 plus outside ... our house is cool enough ... low 20s because we open our windows. It never gets muggy at all.

Last summer, we only had to use our AC twice ... both times when we had company over.

When we are at work, we have our windows opened up on the second floor and the air circulates great!
Stress is caused by NOT fishing enough.
JDM ONLY! No North American CRAP!
Megabass, Imakatsu, Jackall, GanCraft, OSP, EverGreen, YGK, Toray, Sunline, Nories, Shimano, Daiwa RULES!
EVA Air Rocks ... Air Canada SUCKS!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
7465 posts
5753 upvotes
Oakville
AV-Fishing wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2018 10:09 pm
That's right. I have the breaker off once the weather gets below 17 degrees in the fall. Pack it up.

I only flip on the breaker when it gets over 25 degrees outside.

I have AMPLE air flow in the house. Even in the summer, if it is 30 plus outside ... our house is cool enough ... low 20s because we open our windows. It never gets muggy at all.

Last summer, we only had to use our AC twice ... both times when we had company over.

When we are at work, we have our windows opened up on the second floor and the air circulates great!
Wait... I don't get it... how can you let 30'C+ air blow through your house but it stays at 20'C ? That doesn't quite jive with the laws of thermodynamics. Maybe you mean if FEELS like 30'C in the sun?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2008
2577 posts
508 upvotes
Oshawa
Shade between two houses on the East and West. Windows of the house being North and South. It brings in ample cool air.

I've lived in two different houses (over 30 years combined) both are north-south with houses are the east and west sides.

Each summer, the AC is barely used.
Stress is caused by NOT fishing enough.
JDM ONLY! No North American CRAP!
Megabass, Imakatsu, Jackall, GanCraft, OSP, EverGreen, YGK, Toray, Sunline, Nories, Shimano, Daiwa RULES!
EVA Air Rocks ... Air Canada SUCKS!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
7465 posts
5753 upvotes
Oakville
AV-Fishing wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2018 10:39 pm
Shade between two houses on the East and West. Windows of the house being North and South. It brings in ample cool air.

I've lived in two different houses (over 30 years combined) both are north-south with houses are the east and west sides.

Each summer, the AC is barely used.
Right but the air itself couldn't be 30'C otherwise it would heat up your house. Certainly your house could stay cool during the day if it's shaded.

Top