Green / Eco-Friendly

How many KWh do you use in a day?

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  • Jan 16th, 2019 10:15 pm
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theguyz wrote:
Jul 25th, 2018 10:30 am
Fridge is 8 years old bigger one 19 C FT. ( have set at 3 degrees fridge and -19 freezer ), will try and run a weeks run on it, as I have almost had time to run through all devices and appliances and energy monitor will be free.

Freezer is stand up one, which are know to not be energy effecient, soon as you open and close door, even for a second it runs at 125 watts, but settles down to standby and 50 watts. And only 7 years old.

I assumed these where decent wattage usage, but may investigate farther.

Yes dryers are pigs and technology has not changed much( was told this when bought that 15 year old and newer not much different in energy effeciency ), only decent feature on ours which is about 4 years old is heat sensor, detects when cloths are dry, sometimes a run will be an hour, other times if smaller load 20-30 minutes. We did start using air tumble dry feature for smaller loads, but forgot the times to check the TOU website....may look into further this weekend.


With some research I have found that the TP-Link HS110 is up to 4% in accurate readings. So anything I have gotten at 100 watts could actually be 104 or 96 watts.
Investigating further is a good idea.
I would use a kill a watt or similar (is your HS110 such a device) and measure for a week uninterrupted on each fridge/freezer because energy usage is not measured by the watts when the compressor is running because fridges/freezers run intermittently not constantly. Two weeks would be even better to get a kW/day number. The 4% inaccuracy is not ideal but not hideously terrible.

ChubChub wrote:
Jul 25th, 2018 12:27 pm
I wasn't saying the PC is a heavy lifter, but I "AM" saying that every watt that your PC puts out is another watt that you have to cool down. While you might think re-balancing can't COMPLETELY fix it (you might be right), reducing your PCs heat dissipation from (say) 400w to 120w would mean that room is that much easier to cool (I was going to move my actual PC into the basement ... but then I found out range limitations on DisplayPort, and that dashed those plans). You might also consider ripping down some drywall in that garage and insulating the HVAC piping properly (takes time, but the cost is super low). So, while you might still need an A/C unit in there to bring it to an acceptable level, you will potentially need to run it considerably less, or even ONLY on extremely hot days. This same mentality comes with sealing your home; less random air coming in, less energy you need changing that [for this season] hot-humid air into dry cool air. Even something as simple as blackout blinds makes an enormous impact (this is a guideline, but 1sq.m of sunlight on the ground approximately outputs 1kw of heat into a room).

Again, this is obviously not your primary source of excess power consumption, but you sometimes need to look at an "entire system" (in this case: a room, with a human, a computer, printer, maybe stereo, maybe a TV, lights, portable A/C unit, and a [for this season] cold air register that is apparently continuously kicking out cool air) to outright reduce the energy going in to the room, so you can reduce the energy required to then cool the room. And, until you figure out that your driveway heater is on, or you have 4x 100w incandescent bulbs on in your cellar (I did this; whoops), or your neighbour is charging their car off a plug in your pool-room, etc ... it is a way to potentially largely impact the comfortability of a room you're in a lot.
I agree its a system but internal loads are not usually not the biggest contributor. Assume that any heat generated indoors will take 1/3 to remove (a COP of 3 is typical). So those 280W computer savings will reduce heat load by 92Wh plus the 280Wh saved making 372Wh savings. But what computer uses 400Wh, my tower uses 50W average and 102W at 100% CPU utilization (which is rare). If your mining bitcoin that could do it. When i add monitor, modem, speakers etc i get under 75Wh total.
Also you want white window shades, black absorbs heat then radiates it in all directions including into the room and most double glazed windows being Low E means that heat does not escape. Being white it can reflect much of the light back out (which has heat energy) and some of the other UV/IR wavelengths, not all of them because it depends on the white material (i believe titanium dioxide reflects most of the UV/IR). Low E reflects long wave IR back into the building year round, a net gain in winter, a net loss in summer. Some Low E coating also keep it out but no way to know what coating material you have.
So in summary black will reradiate everything in long wave IR while white will reflect visible and some IR/UV depending on material. Some of the white reflection will still be long wave IR that cannot exit back out through the windows.

ciuvak wrote:
Jul 25th, 2018 1:28 pm
Look up ventless "heat pump" driers. These are different than plain condensing driers from past. The heat pump recycles the produced heat, instead of dumping it outdoors. The driers use 2-3 times less electricity, but might not be for everyone depending on where it's installed, etc. We've had a heat pump drier for about a year now and it works very well. Unfortunately I haven't monitored it to post some concrete numbers.
I have a ventless heat pump dryer, it uses about 2-2.5kWh/load. It also leaves all the heat energy indoors, great in winter, and extra load in summer. But its in my uninsulated unfinished basement meaning some of that excess heat goes into the ground so the load its adding is hard to calculate.
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I average 4kWh to 18kWh. Trying to figure out why there is such a difference...... Heater is not on yet, I roughly spent the same amount of time at home and use the same lighting. The only difference I know is that some days I do laundry and so the dryer is on for a load of clothes. Living in a 805sq apartment. Is that a bit much for just one person?
Sep 12, 2018 5.40
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The dryer will use about 5kW per load
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Last 12 months ....

IMG_20181116_192111.jpg
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AV-Fishing wrote:
Nov 16th, 2018 8:22 pm
Last 12 months ....
Impressive numbers. Any reason why your Jan-Feb is just as high as Jul-Aug?

Heatwaves in July and August tool a tool on my usage. Compared to last year I am up about 150 kWh
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bubuski wrote:
Nov 17th, 2018 9:31 am
Impressive numbers. Any reason why your Jan-Feb is just as high as Jul-Aug?

Heatwaves in July and August tool a tool on my usage. Compared to last year I am up about 150 kWh
More parties held during those months earlier this year.

Summer... Mowed lawn each weekend. Electric craftsman from the 80s and it still motors like mad.
Stress is caused by NOT fishing enough.
JDM ONLY! No North American CRAP!
Megabass, Imakatsu, Jackall, GanCraft, OSP, EverGreen, YGK, Toray, Sunline, Nories, Shimano, Daiwa RULES!
EVA Air Rocks ... Air Canada SUCKS!
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25 KWh in a ~4,000 s.f. 2 person + 2 cat house during the non-heating season (hardly use A/C, maybe 12 hrs over the entire summer) so probably have a lot of parasitic electrical consumption (two modem/routers, 1 wi-fi routers, 1 STB, 1 FTTH modem, too many telephones). Most of the regularly-used lights are LED or CFL. 1 fridge (no freezer) and 1 chest freezer.

Over the winter, it's anywhere from 45-75+ KWh a day (only heating source is a heat pump - set not to use auxiliary electric heating until outside temp is below -1C and then only after 25 minutes of heat pump operation.) depending on external temperature (much less on a warm winter day).

Have an electric water heater recently replaced by a supposedly higher-efficiency (and smaller) one.

Dryer is only used a couple of times a fortnight at most in winter, hardly/never from spring through autumn. Washer is an older front load and we use how water for towels and bed sheets. Do admit I like to use extra heating for the DW but we generally run that only every 1-2 days (less than once every 24-30 hrs).

Thermostat is set to heat to 19C from ~07-13h, 20C from 13h to 22h, 17C overnight (we're home most of the time).

Attic insulation increased from R-10/20 to R-50/60 end of last week and very early (3 days' worth) data seems to indicate a 4-5 KWh savings a day for comparable outside temperatures. Doors have been sealed tight as bet as I can as have air leaks into the attic.

Though it is a milder winter (our second), our electrical consumption cost is ~$200 per month at a marginal rate of ~12¢/KWh. The previous (late owners) apparently ran up monthly bills as high as $600 p.m.
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Hi all,

I found this thread while frantically searching about 'average KWh' after I noticed my projected Hydro Quebec bill for the end of January is looking to be around the $800 mark for 65 days.

A bit of background info - For 12 years my partner and I lived in a 2 bedroom 900 sq ft apartment, and we were paying $60 equalized payment bills every month. We moved into a home in June and we expected to pay more of course, but I just can't understand why my average kWh is way off than most people here or even the Hydro Quebec average they estimate on their website for a detached home. I'm currently averaging 119.7 kWh/day, my home is ~1700 sq ft., detached, 2-story.

We are 2 people, no children. I work from home most of the week, and my partner is rarely home. I cook quick meals maybe 3-4 times a week. I'm not using the oven more than 5 hours total a week. We do 3 loads of laundry a week. We both take 5-7 minute showers each a couple times a week, and we are not taking any baths. The main floor thermostat is set to 19°C (I lowered this 2 weeks ago from 21°C). We have no thermostats upstairs where the bedrooms are that control the temp. Only one in the bathroom for the heated floors which we have set to 25°C, but I can't imagine this is consuming a lot. Or maybe it is? We have a propane fireplace that I've been using in the evenings so the heater actually doesn't come on for hours sometimes. We have a Goodman HVAC unit, and the compressor(?) doesn't come on once the outside temp reaches -10°C I believe. Instead, beyond -10°C, it runs from the inside furnace(?) (sorry I'm just learning about all this stuff so I don't know some of the right terms or how this works exactly).

We have a little heater in the garage that is set to 15°C. We have electric baseboards (2) in the basement (500 sq ft). They are off most of the time since we don't spend much time there. When my partner is there on his computer, it's set to 20°C. We have a pool that we use in summer that we occasionally heat, however I'm not so concerned about our summer consumption at the moment. (FYI, we averaged 55 kWh/day in summer). We have a couple of strings of LED Christmas lights outside, but they've barely been on honestly because that outdoor GFCI outlet keeps tripping for some reason. We changed it last week but it still tripped twice so we've just kept the lights off.

What am I missing? It just seems ridiculous for two people (one who is barely home) to be consuming that much electricity. The family of 4 before us didn't even use this much, and they were likely doing loads and loads of laundry with children, and running baths almost every night.

Maybe our HVAC isn't running properly? Do filters need to be changed every so often? There's also a humidity fan knob that I see above my thermostat. Could this be eating power? On my thermostat there's also a 'Fan' setting. It was set to 'ON' until a few days ago and I just turned it to 'AUTO'. Not sure what this is exactly or what it does, but those are my only two options (on and auto).

Any ideas of suggestions are welcome and appreciated!

Thanks for taking the time to read this.
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This is hard to diagnose over the internet but i'll give it a quick whirl.
What sources are you using for heat, hot water, dryer, and other heaters?
Electric, gas, etc. Your propane fireplace probably does not make up a high percentage of your heat requirements but it depends on layout, usage, insulation and so on.

Your garage heater stands out, is it electric and is your garage insulated?
Its a safe bet its eating a good percent just on its own because garages are rarely insulated and the doors are notorious energy bleeders in poor air tightness and low R values.
How old is your house?
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As mentioned above, what is the Goodman HVAC and what is auxiliary heat? If it is a heat pump (sounds like it from the fact the compressor is even running this time of the year), it probably doesn't work well at 0C let alone at -10C. Auxiliary heat could be electrical strips which are expensive (like running a plug-in fan heater essentially) or could be gas/oil. Might want to have the heat pump looked at. If you get a new heat pump, get a Mitsubishi Zuba.

The fan on the HVAC system is set to come on when heat (or cooling) is active when set to AUTO, but works all the time when set to ON. Power consumption is higher for an AC motor (single speed) than DC (usually can be multi-speed) one.

I wouldn't heat the garage for one.

Look for leaks around doors and windows. In the spring, go up to the attic and see what insulation is up there (bring it up to R-60 if your roof allows it). Also check for air leaks through the vapour barrier from light fixtures, bathroom exhaust fans, etc. and seal these up.
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TamaraMTL wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 10:52 am
Hi all,

I found this thread while frantically searching about 'average KWh' after I noticed my projected Hydro Quebec bill for the end of January is looking to be around the $800 mark for 65 days.

A bit of background info - For 12 years my partner and I lived in a 2 bedroom 900 sq ft apartment, and we were paying $60 equalized payment bills every month. We moved into a home in June and we expected to pay more of course, but I just can't understand why my average kWh is way off than most people here or even the Hydro Quebec average they estimate on their website for a detached home. I'm currently averaging 119.7 kWh/day, my home is ~1700 sq ft., detached, 2-story.

We are 2 people, no children. I work from home most of the week, and my partner is rarely home. I cook quick meals maybe 3-4 times a week. I'm not using the oven more than 5 hours total a week. We do 3 loads of laundry a week. We both take 5-7 minute showers each a couple times a week, and we are not taking any baths. The main floor thermostat is set to 19°C (I lowered this 2 weeks ago from 21°C). We have no thermostats upstairs where the bedrooms are that control the temp. Only one in the bathroom for the heated floors which we have set to 25°C, but I can't imagine this is consuming a lot. Or maybe it is? We have a propane fireplace that I've been using in the evenings so the heater actually doesn't come on for hours sometimes. We have a Goodman HVAC unit, and the compressor(?) doesn't come on once the outside temp reaches -10°C I believe. Instead, beyond -10°C, it runs from the inside furnace(?) (sorry I'm just learning about all this stuff so I don't know some of the right terms or how this works exactly).

We have a little heater in the garage that is set to 15°C. We have electric baseboards (2) in the basement (500 sq ft). They are off most of the time since we don't spend much time there. When my partner is there on his computer, it's set to 20°C. We have a pool that we use in summer that we occasionally heat, however I'm not so concerned about our summer consumption at the moment. (FYI, we averaged 55 kWh/day in summer). We have a couple of strings of LED Christmas lights outside, but they've barely been on honestly because that outdoor GFCI outlet keeps tripping for some reason. We changed it last week but it still tripped twice so we've just kept the lights off.

What am I missing? It just seems ridiculous for two people (one who is barely home) to be consuming that much electricity. The family of 4 before us didn't even use this much, and they were likely doing loads and loads of laundry with children, and running baths almost every night.

Maybe our HVAC isn't running properly? Do filters need to be changed every so often? There's also a humidity fan knob that I see above my thermostat. Could this be eating power? On my thermostat there's also a 'Fan' setting. It was set to 'ON' until a few days ago and I just turned it to 'AUTO'. Not sure what this is exactly or what it does, but those are my only two options (on and auto).

Any ideas of suggestions are welcome and appreciated!

Thanks for taking the time to read this.
Your high bills are very likely due to something making heat with electricity; space heaters, baseboard heaters, water heater, etc. The garage heater set to 15°C is likely running virtually all day, and is definitely a part of your problem; it is costing you 30days x 24hours x (wattage rating/1000) x electricity cost (I'd guess $100/mo, or more). If you must keep your garage warm, you might consider setting it to something more reasonable like 5°C, and looking to see if you can insulate your garage better.

Your fan being set to "on" is also a (relatively) needless draw, so by turning it to "auto", you'll likely save a few bucks as well ("on" means the fan always spins to circulate air around your home [might help with equalizing temperatures in cooler/warmer rooms], "auto" means it only spins when the HVAC is trying to heat/cool your home).

Excluding those two obvious issues, that will still only make maybe a $300 dent in that projection, so you definitely have something else drawing substantial power. I don't know much about heatpipes, but it kindof sounds like you might have one. If so, I believe there could be some electric heat components in there there, which are spendy to run.

You need to find out what you have, and tackle the big problems (if you can) as soon as possible. From there, you can look for other easy wins (LED lights, unplugging your DVR, turning down brightness on monitors, etc). You might also look into a device called a Kill-A-Watt ( Amazon Link ); it can help with finding the power draw of various devices, and maybe with this data, you can mitigate the power draw in some way (you plug it in, plug your device into it, and it tells you power consumption .. instantly, or even over time).
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TamaraMTL wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 10:52 am
Hi all,

I found this thread while frantically searching about 'average KWh' after I noticed my projected Hydro Quebec bill for the end of January is looking to be around the $800 mark for 65 days...
Without more details such as what your heat source is for water, etc., I'd agree with the others. The first culprit would be the garage heater. Unless you have a fully insulated garage, you are basically just heating the outdoors. What is the reason for heating the garage?
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don242 wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2019 1:23 pm
What is the reason for heating the garage?
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Thank you all so much for your input. I'd like to address the questions that came up.

Garage heater: The home was built in 2012. The garage is fully insulated. The reason we run the heat in the garage is to de-humidify some expensive equipment (welders, metal fab tools) we have stored in there (no car in the garage, we never open the garage door). The heater cycles maybe 15-20 times a day for 5-8 minutes. But we will lower it to 5°C and see if that changes anything. The bathroom is also directly above the garage so we are concerned that leaving it at near freezing would cause the bathroom to be colder than it already is. Also, not sure what temp to shoot for to provide dehumidification...

Heating: We have a heat pump/AC unit and auxiliary heating is provided an electric furnace. The heat pump only comes on when needed between 0 and -10°, so these days it's not being used. Attached to the furnace is a HRV. (Heat Recovery Ventilator). The HRV is activated by timer switches in the bathrooms or by the humidity control on the main floor, right next to the thermostat. We're not very clear on how it's supposed to work. We were told to set the humidity according to a temperature chart. Curiously, when we set it for for ~40% (it is currently -8°C outside) the ventilator runs 24 hours a day. You can hear that the "click point" of the rotary knob is quite far from there so I don't expect it to turn off. There is no condensation on any of our windows, so we're not sure if this is right.

In an effort to get a better understanding, my partner went into the utility room to see how everything is hooked up. To our surprise the little room which is sealed off by a door, felt like it was -10°C. He looked at all the plumbing and checked it against the spec sheet for the HRV. And it looks to be routed correctly. The core inside the HRV was frozen solid. There was a rush of ice cold air coming out of the feed from outside. It made us wonder how much heat are we losing through the HRV? So while the core defrosted in a sink, we plugged up the two outdoor ports with towels (inside the HRV) and closed up the box, and unplugged the power. The little room is no longer cold, it's now the same temperature as the rest of the house. So this is definitely concerning. The HRV hasn't run in 4-5 days and we haven't noticed any difference really. One thing we wonder about now, how much heat is lost via the HRV when it is sitting there idle? The feed to the furnace still draws from the HRV through that core...

As I mentioned, I often substitute the heating in the evening (most of the time) with the propane fireplace and it REALLY heats up the main floor. So much so that the heat pump/furnace will not come on for hours after it's been turned off. (The only thermostat is on the main floor, near the fire place.)

The reason the ventilator on the furnace was set to run 24/7 was because of issue we've been battling. There is a large difference in temp from floor to floor. If it's 19°C on the main floor, it's 13-15 upstairs. We sleep great in the low temps, but we certainly don't hang out upstairs otherwise. What I don't understand is that you'd expect heat to rise to the second floor. I'd expect it to be hotter upstairs than downstairs. In summer, we struggle with the AC. It'll be comfortable on the main floor, the upstairs will be hot and sticky, and the basement is a meat locker. We tried playing with the vents and flaps but it changed virtually nothing. Now strangely, the issue is reversed in winter. We are okay on the main floor, but freeze upstairs and in the basement. Running the HRV or main fan changes little.

Hot water is provided by your typical electric water heater. It is set to 140°F.

Thanks again for reading this very long post. I wanted to provide as many details as possible.
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TamaraMTL wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2019 4:35 pm
Thank you all so much for your input. I'd like to address the questions that came up.

Garage heater: The home was built in 2012. The garage is fully insulated. The reason we run the heat in the garage is to de-humidify some expensive equipment (welders, metal fab tools) we have stored in there (no car in the garage, we never open the garage door). The heater cycles maybe 15-20 times a day for 5-8 minutes. But we will lower it to 5°C and see if that changes anything. The bathroom is also directly above the garage so we are concerned that leaving it at near freezing would cause the bathroom to be colder than it already is. Also, not sure what temp to shoot for to provide dehumidification...

Heating: We have a heat pump/AC unit and auxiliary heating is provided an electric furnace. The heat pump only comes on when needed between 0 and -10°, so these days it's not being used. Attached to the furnace is a HRV. (Heat Recovery Ventilator). The HRV is activated by timer switches in the bathrooms or by the humidity control on the main floor, right next to the thermostat. We're not very clear on how it's supposed to work. We were told to set the humidity according to a temperature chart. Curiously, when we set it for for ~40% (it is currently -8°C outside) the ventilator runs 24 hours a day. You can hear that the "click point" of the rotary knob is quite far from there so I don't expect it to turn off. There is no condensation on any of our windows, so we're not sure if this is right.

In an effort to get a better understanding, my partner went into the utility room to see how everything is hooked up. To our surprise the little room which is sealed off by a door, felt like it was -10°C. He looked at all the plumbing and checked it against the spec sheet for the HRV. And it looks to be routed correctly. The core inside the HRV was frozen solid. There was a rush of ice cold air coming out of the feed from outside. It made us wonder how much heat are we losing through the HRV? So while the core defrosted in a sink, we plugged up the two outdoor ports with towels (inside the HRV) and closed up the box, and unplugged the power. The little room is no longer cold, it's now the same temperature as the rest of the house. So this is definitely concerning. The HRV hasn't run in 4-5 days and we haven't noticed any difference really. One thing we wonder about now, how much heat is lost via the HRV when it is sitting there idle? The feed to the furnace still draws from the HRV through that core...

As I mentioned, I often substitute the heating in the evening (most of the time) with the propane fireplace and it REALLY heats up the main floor. So much so that the heat pump/furnace will not come on for hours after it's been turned off. (The only thermostat is on the main floor, near the fire place.)

The reason the ventilator on the furnace was set to run 24/7 was because of issue we've been battling. There is a large difference in temp from floor to floor. If it's 19°C on the main floor, it's 13-15 upstairs. We sleep great in the low temps, but we certainly don't hang out upstairs otherwise. What I don't understand is that you'd expect heat to rise to the second floor. I'd expect it to be hotter upstairs than downstairs. In summer, we struggle with the AC. It'll be comfortable on the main floor, the upstairs will be hot and sticky, and the basement is a meat locker. We tried playing with the vents and flaps but it changed virtually nothing. Now strangely, the issue is reversed in winter. We are okay on the main floor, but freeze upstairs and in the basement. Running the HRV or main fan changes little.

Hot water is provided by your typical electric water heater. It is set to 140°F.

Thanks again for reading this very long post. I wanted to provide as many details as possible.
Your house needs someone competent with these issues to give it a once over.
Also your garage heater is probably running quite a bit, the garage door is almost certainly leaky, the exterior walls are often not insulated in garages and if the adjacent room would be even colder you have problems.
Your HRV needs to be diagnosed and fixed.
Your HVAC is poorly balanced or poorly designed and from the sounds of it your house is missing insulation.
The beatings will continue until morale improves

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