Green / Eco-Friendly

How many KWh do you use in a day?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 17th, 2019 4:50 pm
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Jul 7, 2017
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Could be the humidity levels here. It's pretty much near saturation outside over the winter (or rather, monsoon season which is ~7-8 months a year) on most overcast/cloudy days (may drop to 80% on a sunny, clear day), and a fairly constant low 60% inside (not sure what it is inside the sunroom which is built over a patio above and adjacent to inhabited/heated space). RH is around 50-55% inside and out in dry season a.k.a. summer.

The current humidity issues come when the temperature drops (relatively) rapidly and overnight and there's a wind that chills the double-paned windows. RH at the surfaces climbs to 100% hence dew.

If you can tell me how to keep the sun room dry, I'm all ears.
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thriftshopper wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 8:28 pm
Could be the humidity levels here. It's pretty much near saturation outside over the winter (or rather, monsoon season which is ~7-8 months a year) on most overcast/cloudy days (may drop to 80% on a sunny, clear day), and a fairly constant low 60% inside (not sure what it is inside the sunroom which is built over a patio above and adjacent to inhabited/heated space). RH is around 50-55% inside and out in dry season a.k.a. summer.

The current humidity issues come when the temperature drops (relatively) rapidly and overnight and there's a wind that chills the double-paned windows. RH at the surfaces climbs to 100% hence dew.

If you can tell me how to keep the sun room dry, I'm all ears.
Again your advice is the wrong advice for someone in Montreal in a winter climate who would see your absolute worst as a bad late spring day not worth remembering.
Or in other words giving advice to someone with an EV on how to adjust their carburetor...
But you can go here and ask some building scientists about your situation
https://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/qa
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Well, maybe the Laval resident is not an environmental hardcore. May be impractical to move the equipment to somewhere warm enough and dry so it does't get damp and rot. Garage may be warm enough - which would indicate a possible air leak from the house - to dehumidify to 80% (or whatever) and not freeze the dehumidifier. It's a compromise between absolute minimum use and maintaining equipment. Some stuff has to be heated (I guess you're not a fan of heated storage or block heaters). We can't all lie w/o power consumption.
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May 23, 2009
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Finally reviewed my 2018 usage. Still need to do something about my incandescent Christmas lights as it should be able to get my December and January to under 440kWh.

January: 488.66kWh
February: 354.12kWh
March: 340.31kWh
April: 293.97kWh
May: 391.43kWh
June: 437.75kWh
July: 596.94kWh
August: 565.97kWh
September: 443.48kWh
October: 358.02kWh
November: 353.9kWh
December: 525.42kWh

We consumed 5149.97kWh in 2018, down 21.1kWh from 2017.
Average daily usage works out to 14.1kWh

TOU split
On-Peak rate $$$: 14% usage
Mid-peak rate $$: 15% usage
Off-peak rate $: 71% usage

Overall I happy as it is still 20% less than my usage from 2011-2015. Alectra/Enersource swiftly replaced my smart meter again in 2018...2nd time in the past 2 years. Their comparison tool ranks me at 624 out of 3721 similar accounts

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bubuski wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 10:43 am
Finally reviewed my 2018 usage. Still need to do something about my incandescent Christmas lights as it should be able to get my December and January to under 440kWh.
Thats very good. When you take out the big wasters and want to keep lowering you need to start auditing everything to the watt. Your Christmas lights are one thing, if you use a clothes dryer thats a big consumer 4-5kW a load the easiest way to reduce here is to reduce the number of loads you wash if you can, i assume you have replaced incandescent with LED, if you have a kill a watt you can test everything you own that plugs in on it.
The harder to reduce are older fridges if you have them, electric/induction stove if you have them, phantom loads from things like cable boxes, video game machines can use a surprising amount. Also computers don't use a lot but if in use for hours a day it multiples. Monitors can be misers or hogs and many people don't turn the computer off when its not in use. Also modems and routers add up but are hard to do without (but you might be able to replace to reduce energy use).
Test everything, i had an old CRT TV that used 6W phantom load and iirc 100W in operation. My old 19" LCD monitor used 29W and the new one uses 12W on 50% back light (23W on 100% back light which i don't use).
Interestingly enough cell phones use very little power, its just that batteries are not very energy dense. A 3000mAh battery holds 11.1Wm plus some overhead for charging. So likely 12-13W and if that lasts you a day its about 400Wh/month or 0.4kWh. But audit it anyways, you may find you have a charger with a high phantom load. Test your Christmas lights as well and the new ones when you get them so you can determine how much energy your saving.
Replacing appliances to reduce energy use is often not economic (always worth doing the math) but if your replacing because they failed you can often use the opportunity to buy a more efficient replacement.
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May 23, 2009
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For 2019 I'd like to reduce my yearly average by 1kWh. I thought I made the changes for 2018 but the hotter than normal summer took care of that. Vacation mode of the house consumes less than 7kWh, occupied mode on the hottest summer day is less than 20kWh.

My Christmas lights are the easy way out. Six strings of C9 incandescent bulbs, 144 bulbs pulling 7 Watts each. I'm disappointed with the consumption but still love the glow compared to the LED versions that are avialable in big box stores and will be keeping them for now.

I'll have to closely track the smaller electronic devices because the heavy usage appliances are all gone. Fridge and dishwasher first in 2011, 2012 was addition of a freezer as well as a change from electric to gas stove. Then towards the end of 2015 we threw in better windows, increased attic insulation to R60, changed A/C to SEER 16, got an ECM furnace and changed the dryer from electric to gas. We run the furnace fan 12 hrs daily and use the dryer generously...sometimes on-peak. Hopefully I'll have a new game plan by the end of January to cut consumption further.
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1kWh/day reduction is your goal?

7kWh/day is a fair bit (213.5kWh/month) or almost half your total annual usage (2562kWh).
Where is it going?

Your Christmas lights use 1.008kWh per hour of usage times hours a day times number of day a year.
Lets say 5 hours a day for 45 days a year is 226.8kWh, more then a month of vacation usage.

What do your fridge and dishwasher use per day/load now? For the fridge test with a kill a watt for a week and divide by 7 to iron out spikes. Also it will use a bit less in winter and a bit more in summer. The Energy Star ratings are not what to go buy, they are tested in a test cycle which won't match your usage patterns but can be used to compare models that have undergone the same test cycle. IIRC LG gamed their energy star rating but thats another story. Surprisingly i have beat the Energy Star rating on most of the fridges i have owned/tested.
For a dishwasher thats hard wired you don't have much else to go by unless you have a whole house energy monitor and can subtract everything else, even a clamp on ammeter won't work because the different cycles will use differing amounts, unless the meter has a cumulative measurement feature (i've never seen one that does). You can check the manual or contact the manufacturer.

Chest freezers often don't use too much but test it anyways. Also run a defrost cycle on it regularly, accumulated ice is a poor thermal conductor and will reduce its efficiency and lifetime.

Your better windows and insulation will only reduce your electrical bill slightly but will reduce your gas bill so thats a definite bonus.
Why do you run the furnace fan 12 hours a day. If its an ECM furnace motor thats running it may only use 100-200W (test it with a whole house energy monitor) but that makes 1.2-2.4kWh/day or 438-876kWh/year. Thats a lot and would meet your goal right there by eliminating it. If your speaking of an HRV then determine its electrical usage. In either case if you can't get a meter to measure it try contacting the manufacturer and they might have the info to provide.

As for your dryer loads you could invest in an expensive heat pump dryer if you can find one but the easiest way is to find a way to reduce the amount of laundry you have to do or use a drying rack/clothesline.
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Oct 9, 2010
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bubuski wrote:
Jan 13th, 2019 8:20 pm
For 2019 I'd like to reduce my yearly average by 1kWh. I thought I made the changes for 2018 but the hotter than normal summer took care of that. Vacation mode of the house consumes less than 7kWh, occupied mode on the hottest summer day is less than 20kWh.

My Christmas lights are the easy way out. Six strings of C9 incandescent bulbs, 144 bulbs pulling 7 Watts each. I'm disappointed with the consumption but still love the glow compared to the LED versions that are avialable in big box stores and will be keeping them for now.

I'll have to closely track the smaller electronic devices because the heavy usage appliances are all gone. Fridge and dishwasher first in 2011, 2012 was addition of a freezer as well as a change from electric to gas stove. Then towards the end of 2015 we threw in better windows, increased attic insulation to R60, changed A/C to SEER 16, got an ECM furnace and changed the dryer from electric to gas. We run the furnace fan 12 hrs daily and use the dryer generously...sometimes on-peak. Hopefully I'll have a new game plan by the end of January to cut consumption further.
RE: Xmas lights; if your bulbs are the "frosted" kind (IMO, the quintessential "Christmas light"), find these ... GE Colorite C9 . They're about as close to a real C9 as you can get for an LED. I was unable to find them this year, but am hoping to dig up some sets before next.

I share your xmas light hatred; every year I get something a little better, but never good enough :). I went for white lights this year, and found some LEDs that reduced my draw from ~2,400w to ~200w.; I'll die before I get a ROI on them (though I do run them for ~14h/day for 30 days), but whatever :).
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ChubChub wrote:
Jan 14th, 2019 12:49 pm
RE: Xmas lights; if your bulbs are the "frosted" kind (IMO, the quintessential "Christmas light"), find these ... GE Colorite C9 . They're about as close to a real C9 as you can get for an LED. I was unable to find them this year, but am hoping to dig up some sets before next.

I share your xmas light hatred; every year I get something a little better, but never good enough :). I went for white lights this year, and found some LEDs that reduced my draw from ~2,400w to ~200w.; I'll die before I get a ROI on them (though I do run them for ~14h/day for 30 days), but whatever :).
Egads
2400W for 14 hours a day and 30 days makes 1008kWh!
At 15c/kWh you were paying $151.20 a month just for the lights!

200W, 14 hours, 30 days makes 84kWh or $12.60/month.

$138.60/year savings
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Quentin5 wrote:
Jan 15th, 2019 1:21 am
Egads
2400W for 14 hours a day and 30 days makes 1008kWh!
At 15c/kWh you were paying $151.20 a month just for the lights!

200W, 14 hours, 30 days makes 84kWh or $12.60/month.

$138.60/year savings
Each string cost me around $30, and i think i bought 20 of them. Assuming they don't fail in the next ~5 years, i guess i will get ROI. Note that i will probably replace them with something "better" before then. :)
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ChubChub wrote:
Jan 15th, 2019 10:40 am
Note that i will probably replace them with something "better" before then. :)
Why?
If you keep them you will save money that can be put towards other uses.
Its a fair bet you could find other electrical efficiencies even if they cost money that you were going to spend on more lights for an even better return.
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Quentin5 wrote:
Jan 16th, 2019 3:20 am
Why?
If you keep them you will save money that can be put towards other uses.
Its a fair bet you could find other electrical efficiencies even if they cost money that you were going to spend on more lights for an even better return.
I'm pretty close to nothing being worth it to change at this point; my "wasted" power consumption is largely the GF's hair (blow-dryers and curlers), how hot she likes the house, how long she takes showers, and my "smart" stuff (coloured lights, speakers, etc) which I like. Well, excluding my leaky fireplace, incomplete basement insulation project, and HWT stack (but who has time for that when you're buying Xmas lights and playing on forums ;) ).

I am only potentially buying "more" Xmas lights because I dislike the appearance of everything I've purchased before this year; LED string lights look like crap compared to incandescent, but I'd happily re-spend that money if I could find something literally indistinguishable from incandescent (does not exist on the market yet).
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May 23, 2009
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Mississauga
Quentin5 wrote:
Jan 13th, 2019 9:01 pm
1kWh/day reduction is your goal?

7kWh/day is a fair bit (213.5kWh/month) or almost half your total annual usage (2562kWh).
Where is it going?

Your Christmas lights use 1.008kWh per hour of usage times hours a day times number of day a year.
Lets say 5 hours a day for 45 days a year is 226.8kWh, more then a month of vacation usage.

What do your fridge and dishwasher use per day/load now? For the fridge test with a kill a watt for a week and divide by 7 to iron out spikes. Also it will use a bit less in winter and a bit more in summer. The Energy Star ratings are not what to go buy, they are tested in a test cycle which won't match your usage patterns but can be used to compare models that have undergone the same test cycle. IIRC LG gamed their energy star rating but thats another story. Surprisingly i have beat the Energy Star rating on most of the fridges i have owned/tested.
For a dishwasher thats hard wired you don't have much else to go by unless you have a whole house energy monitor and can subtract everything else, even a clamp on ammeter won't work because the different cycles will use differing amounts, unless the meter has a cumulative measurement feature (i've never seen one that does). You can check the manual or contact the manufacturer.

Chest freezers often don't use too much but test it anyways. Also run a defrost cycle on it regularly, accumulated ice is a poor thermal conductor and will reduce its efficiency and lifetime.

Your better windows and insulation will only reduce your electrical bill slightly but will reduce your gas bill so thats a definite bonus.
Why do you run the furnace fan 12 hours a day. If its an ECM furnace motor thats running it may only use 100-200W (test it with a whole house energy monitor) but that makes 1.2-2.4kWh/day or 438-876kWh/year. Thats a lot and would meet your goal right there by eliminating it. If your speaking of an HRV then determine its electrical usage. In either case if you can't get a meter to measure it try contacting the manufacturer and they might have the info to provide.

As for your dryer loads you could invest in an expensive heat pump dryer if you can find one but the easiest way is to find a way to reduce the amount of laundry you have to do or use a drying rack/clothesline.
Yeah 7kWh/day is a fair bit but with 4 occupants on most days we barely add an additional 5kWh during the heating season including dishwasher usage. Laundry days have higher consumption and I'm sure my gas dryer uses less energy than a heat pump equivalent. Got two kids with one is being potty trained so excess soiled laundry is just the way things are for a while. I have an energy motor on my meter so of the 7kWh I know my fridge uses about 2kWh, freezer uses just over 1kWh, Internet\TV gear(1 cable box, 1 modem, 1 switch, 1 router, 1 home automation pi) is about 1.8kWh...so I have only about 2.2kWh unaccounted for.

My furnace fan only mode for indoor air circulation pulls 55W but I've have to check if it runs while in vacation mode. We run it for 16hrs while we are home because it makes the house much more comfortable. For the extra 0.88kWh it adds it is worth it.
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May 23, 2009
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ChubChub wrote:
Jan 16th, 2019 12:02 pm
.
.
.

I am only potentially buying "more" Xmas lights because I dislike the appearance of everything I've purchased before this year; LED string lights look like crap compared to incandescent, but I'd happily re-spend that money if I could find something literally indistinguishable from incandescent (does not exist on the market yet).
TRUTH!

I actually started off with LED Christmas lights. Hated them after the 1st season and donated it to my inlaws and got the incandescent set that i am currently using. I've got tons of extra bulbs too. Started off with warm white, then mixed in red, then the real boss of the house said I should add green so they are now white, red and green alternating bulbs. I think we'll eventually end up with warm white LEDs because most set now have blue which we don't like. I'm willing to spend the money to try out LEDs once in a while but if I dislike them it really kills the urge and excitement to climb up on the roof to install/remove them each year.
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