Wheels and Tires

How many years will tires in storage last?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 12th, 2018 5:24 pm
[OP]
Member
Sep 29, 2007
496 posts
84 upvotes

How many years will tires in storage last?

I have purchased a set of rims that come with great rubber so will be swapping those onto my car and storing the tires I currently have until I have mileaged out these new tires. Based on my driving that could take 5-6 years. I plan to store the tires on the rims in my basement and covered with a garbage bag. Is this too long of a time for storage?

The alternative is that I sell them on Kijiji but selling used tires for a reasonable price is pretty hard in my experience on there.
10 replies
Sr. Member
Apr 6, 2008
589 posts
233 upvotes
I would check the manufacture date on the tires in question. There should be a DOT and then a 4 digit number marked on the sidewall. First two digits are the month and last two are year. So 3206 would be the 32nd week of 2006. I wouldn't drive on tires over 6-7 years old but normally they start to develop small cracks and you can tell. If they are weather cracked and you get them good and hot (such as highway driving on a summer day) you could get a flat or a blowout. Not worth it IMO. Based on this date you should be able to determine how much "life" is left in them. Storing them in a basement is fine, just keep them cool and out of the sun.

I bought a car that had a set of tires that were almost 10 years old and tons of tread. It was a summer driven only car so low mileage but I quickly replaced those tires. Also as they age the rubber gets hard which makes driving poor as they don't corner well.
Last edited by fusion2k2k on Aug 10th, 2018 10:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Member
Apr 15, 2014
308 posts
240 upvotes
Toronto, ON
retireat50 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2018 10:27 pm
I have purchased a set of rims that come with great rubber so will be swapping those onto my car and storing the tires I currently have until I have mileaged out these new tires. Based on my driving that could take 5-6 years. I plan to store the tires on the rims in my basement and covered with a garbage bag. Is this too long of a time for storage?

The alternative is that I sell them on Kijiji but selling used tires for a reasonable price is pretty hard in my experience on there.
Best would be to keep them elevated off the ground on some kind of hanger or rack. I probably wouldn't let them rest on the floor.
Please respond
[OP]
Member
Sep 29, 2007
496 posts
84 upvotes
fusion2k2k wrote:
Aug 10th, 2018 10:41 pm
I would check the manufacture date on the tires in question. There should be a DOT and then a 4 digit number marked on the sidewall. First two digits are the month and last two are year. So 3206 would be the 32nd week of 2006. I wouldn't drive on tires over 6-7 years old but normally they start to develop small cracks and you can tell. If they are weather cracked and you get them good and hot (such as highway driving on a summer day) you could get a flat or a blowout. Not worth it IMO. Based on this date you should be able to determine how much "life" is left in them. Storing them in a basement is fine, just keep them cool and out of the sun.

I bought a car that had a set of tires that were almost 10 years old and tons of tread. It was a summer driven only car so low mileage but I quickly replaced those tires. Also as they age the rubber gets hard which makes driving poor as they don't corner well.
good call - i see these were made in Nov 2017. With that timeline you are saying basically in 6 years toss them....what if I start using them in year 5 - typically would take me 4 years to mileage out a tire so that would be close to 10 years total. Definitely too much?
Deal Addict
Jun 18, 2008
4694 posts
3355 upvotes
Montreal
You're going to get all types of opinions going by personal experience, yes they will last. Many of the experts here will tell you they won't and should replace tires every 6-7 years. FWIW my summer car is still driving on 10 year old front tires, 30k on them stored every summer, my daily is going on 9 years 80,000km on them and my winters are 7 years old. All still look good. I have a relative with an 86 Grand National with about 50,000km that stays mostly in storage with the original tires still on. IMO though, I think you should sell them just based on the room they will occupy for 5 years. Tires also don't smell very pleasant either.
Sr. Member
Feb 11, 2018
828 posts
672 upvotes
retireat50 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2018 10:27 pm
I have purchased a set of rims that come with great rubber so will be swapping those onto my car and storing the tires I currently have until I have mileaged out these new tires. Based on my driving that could take 5-6 years. I plan to store the tires on the rims in my basement and covered with a garbage bag. Is this too long of a time for storage?

The alternative is that I sell them on Kijiji but selling used tires for a reasonable price is pretty hard in my experience on there.
You will be fine. Store the tires one next to each other vertically. Do not pile them horizontally and do not put any weight on them. I know they say tires shouldn't be used after 10 years since date of manufacture. But, in particular if they are high quality like Michelin, you can keep using them past the 10 years. FWIW, I drove all-season Michelin until they were 14 years old. And drove winter tires made in Sweden (forgot the name) until they were 18 years old.

EDIT: If I'm not mistaken the winter tires were Gislaved (Nordfrost???).
Paying less is only half the equation. The other half is buying less... ;)
Deal Fanatic
Feb 15, 2006
7409 posts
1822 upvotes
Toronto
The tires are 2017 so should be fine in a few years. But I'd sell them now rather than having them take up storage room. You many not have a car that can use those tires in 5-6 years.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jul 12, 2003
9139 posts
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Markham
I would sell them now. You don’t need them for another 5 years or so, you may be driving a different car by the. Who knows. I rather cash in my pocket now then 4 wheels that takes up my space and not knowing if I need them after 5 years.
Retired Forum Moderator February 2009 - June 2015
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Jun 24, 2006
5887 posts
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TomLafinsky wrote:
Aug 11th, 2018 12:47 am
You will be fine. Store the tires one next to each other vertically. Do not pile them horizontally and do not put any weight on them. I know they say tires shouldn't be used after 10 years since date of manufacture. But, in particular if they are high quality like Michelin, you can keep using them past the 10 years. FWIW, I drove all-season Michelin until they were 14 years old. And drove winter tires made in Sweden (forgot the name) until they were 18 years old.

EDIT: If I'm not mistaken the winter tires were Gislaved (Nordfrost???).
Do to just drive to the end of your driveway and back to get the mail? Lol.

I have trouble getting 3 years out of set of tires.
Sr. Member
Feb 11, 2018
828 posts
672 upvotes
Gutty96 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2018 8:18 am
Do to just drive to the end of your driveway and back to get the mail? Lol.

I have trouble getting 3 years out of set of tires.
Nah, I used to keep 4 vehicles so mileage was spread on all 4 (now I'm down to 3). The winter tires that lasted me 18 years is because I stopped using that car in winter for like 6-7 years. I kept the winter wheels in my basement.
Paying less is only half the equation. The other half is buying less... ;)

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