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How much debris do you let down the kitchen sink?

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  • Apr 7th, 2017 10:05 am
[OP]
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Dec 23, 2015
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Newmarket, ON

How much debris do you let down the kitchen sink?

Do you have a strainer on the sink so not even the tiniest crumbs can get through? Or do you just let small things go down the sink? Or are you completely careless and even let bigger chunks of food down the sink? What about grease, sauces, etc?

Also do you ever flush your sink with boiling water, or drano, or something else?
31 replies
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Nov 19, 2004
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Cambridge, ON
Whatever the strainer collects we dump out, otherwise it goes down the drain. We don't put grease down the drain though. Collect that in a bottle and toss it in the garbage when it gets full.
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Oct 16, 2008
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Maple
+1
don242 wrote: Whatever the strainer collects we dump out, otherwise it goes down the drain. We don't put grease down the drain though. Collect that in a bottle and toss it in the garbage when it gets full.
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Oct 13, 2014
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Just Moved To Somewh…
Strainer contents dump in the compost bin. Grease; collect and save to mix with dog food (special treat), wipe pan with paper towel and put in compost. Sauces; depending on the sauce it goes to compost bin or again special treat to mix with dog food. Warning: before using grease or sauces as an add-on to your dog food get your veterinarian's approval for type and quantities.
“Before one can have a Clue they must first accumulate 10 Inklings. That said, all it takes is one bad post and you erase all Clues accumulated'"
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Jun 25, 2004
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Pickering, ON
Yeah, strain and goes into the green bin.

Large quantities of oil are double-bagged and thrown into the garbage. Solidified fat get wiped up and thrown into the green bin.
Deal Guru
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
Nothing down the drain if I can help it. Strainer to hold back the gunk. Occasionally I will pour some vinegar down the drain if it stars to get smelly, let it sit, then wash it through with a bunch of hot water.
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Sep 9, 2012
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Oakville, ON
Everything short of large bones goes down the drain and through the garburator ftw.
[OP]
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Dec 23, 2015
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Newmarket, ON
I have never seen a garburetor in a Canadian home but they're common in houses in the US, why's that?
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Nov 17, 2012
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Toronto
Just remember - the sink drain connects to the same stack as your toilet. No need to filter out small (or large) particles of food, unless you're filtering out large particles from your toilet too.

Grease on the other hand sticks to the pipes and builds up over time reducing the efficiency of the pipe eventually blocking it. This would go for greasy food too.

Compost as much as you can - reduce the load on the sewage treatment plants downstream. Eventually we'll all have to retrofit our homes with grey water systems that separate sink/tub/shower drains from sewage so the grey water can be filtered, treated on site and reused to flush your toilets / water your lawns.
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Mar 19, 2013
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Prince Albert, Sask.
If the debris goes thru the strainer, down the drain it goes. To freshen the drains a use baking soda & vinegar. I avoid chemicals (Draino).
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Nov 17, 2012
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Toronto
BeapChastard wrote: I have never seen a garburetor in a Canadian home but they're common in houses in the US, why's that?
They're contrary to code in Toronto at least now. I had one up till 8 years ago and grew up with them in Canada. They used to be very common. They're horrible for water treatment systems.

The US is full of backwoods ignorant hicks. That's why they're common in the US.
[OP]
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Dec 23, 2015
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Newmarket, ON
I have trouble believing that small bits of food flushed down the sink would cause any more stress on water treatment systems than poop that everyone flushes down the toilet. I mean isn't poop just food that's been reprocessed by your body?

The reason I started this topic is because I'm getting really tired of constantly having to empty the sink strainer and I was wondering if it'd be ok to just let small particles of food down the sink. Obviously I wouldn't let larger particles down, in fact they wouldn't fit through the holes anyways even without the strainer. I don't want to cause any damage to my pipes but on the other hand I don't want to waste effort using my strainer if I don't have to.
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Oct 19, 2008
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GTA
torontotim wrote: Just remember - the sink drain connects to the same stack as your toilet. No need to filter out small (or large) particles of food, unless you're filtering out large particles from your toilet too.
January I had to cut out the 1 1/2 abs pipe from our kitchen to the stack, it was badly clogged. Basically had a slimy jell that wasn't solid enough the pull back with a snake (plumber's auger). Granted we had a poorly designed run, house is 15 years old....bet its not that uncommon for drain water to leave solids behind after taking a few 45* and then dropping over ducts.
My neighbours have all had similar issues, I'm not drywalling our weight room (under kitchen) because of this. I wouldn't recommend anyone let food go down sink drains unless they know the drain run is short to stack and moves well.
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Apr 18, 2013
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Sometimes when the toilet isn't working...

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