Entertainment

How much do actors get for reruns?

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  • May 30th, 2010 4:18 pm
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[OP]
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Nov 5, 2009
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How much do actors get for reruns?

It is a question that I can not find an answer to. Maybe someone here knows or heard something.

For the casts of Seinfeld, friends, m*a*s*h who taped more than 100 episodes, I always wanted how much they made for reruns, if anything.

Just imagine if they make $100 per rerun episode. I'm sure these shows are shown a thousand times a day all over the world. That's like $100,000 a day per actor. Do you guys think that's possible?

J
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http://www.sag.org/content/residuals

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual_% ... ndustry%29
"The original residual agreements for television shows never anticipated the number of repeat broadcasts that some well-loved television series would eventually see in syndication. As a result, the residual payments were generally limited to about six broadcasts. This was changed in the mid-1970s, when contracts for new television shows extended residual payments without limit on the number of repeats.

Under the current system, the television production company retains 80% of the fees earned from reruns. The other 20% is paid to the various performers and off-camera crew."
These folks have taken over RFD, so I'm done here.

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I remember a few years ago when Wilmer Valderrama from That 70's Show was a guest on Howard Stern, he sorda went into how syndication money works. He didn't get specific about his situation because every actor on every show has their own deal so theres no real formula. Basically the 100 episode mark is what almost every actor is gunning for because after that they pretty much get paid the syndication "for life". Now how much they get paid will vary greatly depending on how big the star is, how popular their show is not just in the US but globally. For Wilmer's situation his show went into double syndication (200 episodes) which is the jackpot and will basically get millions every year for god knows how long.

Some shows are aired a dozen times a day or more in different markets all over the world for many years, even decades. The Simpsons would be a good example of insane syndication money. Its closing in on 500 episodes and is probably one of the most syndicated shows in the world. The main voice actors salary on the show is like $400,000 per episode but I'm sure they make WAY more on syndication.
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I remember reading somewhere that Seinfeld and Larry David own 35% rights to Seinfeld.

Jerry Seinfeld:
According to Forbes magazine, Jerry Seinfeld's annual earning from Seinfeld, in 1998, was $267 million, making him the highest-earning celebrity that year.[30] Seinfeld still generates more revenue than most current shows, through syndication and DVD sales. He reportedly turned down $5 million per episode, for 22 episodes, to continue the show beyond its final season.[31] He earned $100 million from syndication deals and stand-up appearances in 2005 and $60 million in 2006.[32][33] He also earned $10 million for appearing with Bill Gates in Microsoft's 2008 ads for Windows.[34] Between June 2008 and June 2009, Seinfeld earned $85 million, making him the highest-paid comedian during that twelve-month period.[35]
From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Sein ... nal_wealth


Larry David:
Syndication of Seinfeld earned David an estimated US$250 million in 1998 alone. This amount has been steadily decreasing each year, but payments will continue until the full $1.7 billion from the original deal has been paid in full. In 2008 David made $55 million from Seinfeld syndication, DVD sales, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.[21][22] He was nominated for an Emmy award 19 times for Seinfeld, winning twice—once for best comedy and once for writing.[23]
Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_David#Seinfeld

Friends:
The stars were paid, per episode, $75,000 in the third season, $85,000 in the fourth, $100,000 in the fifth, and $125,000 in the sixth season.[23] The cast members received salaries of $750,000 per episode in the seventh and eight seasons, and $1 million per episode in the ninth and tenth.[12] The cast also received syndication royalties beginning with the fifth season.[21]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friends#Ca ... characters
In the fall of 2001, Warner Bros. Domestic Cable made a deal with sister network TBS to air the series in rerun syndication. Warner Bros. made similar deals with various TV stations around the country. In July 2005, it was announced that Warner Bros. Domestic Cable has sold Friends to Nick at Nite to begin airing in the fall of 2011. Warner Bros. is expected to make $200 million in license fees and advertising from the deal. Nick at Nite paid $500,000 per episode to air the episodes after 6 pm for six years, through the fall of 2017. TBS also renewed its contract for the same six year period as Nick at Nite, but only paid $275,000 per episode because airing was restricted to before 6 pm, except for the first year. In syndication until 2005, Friends had earned $4 million per episode in cash license fees, for a total of $944 million.[99]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friends#Broadcast
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dell wrote:
May 28th, 2010 11:55 pm
I remember a few years ago when Wilmer Valderrama from That 70's Show was a guest on Howard Stern, he sorda went into how syndication money works. He didn't get specific about his situation because every actor on every show has their own deal so theres no real formula. Basically the 100 episode mark is what almost every actor is gunning for because after that they pretty much get paid the syndication "for life". Now how much they get paid will vary greatly depending on how big the star is, how popular their show is not just in the US but globally. For Wilmer's situation his show went into double syndication (200 episodes) which is the jackpot and will basically get millions every year for god knows how long.

Some shows are aired a dozen times a day or more in different markets all over the world for many years, even decades. The Simpsons would be a good example of insane syndication money. Its closing in on 500 episodes and is probably one of the most syndicated shows in the world. The main voice actors salary on the show is like $400,000 per episode but I'm sure they make WAY more on syndication.
100 episodes is generally the number of episodes you need to be considered for syndication, but it's not the word for filming 100 episodes. So filming 200 episodes doesn't mean "double syndication", and more episodes doesn't necessarily mean more royalties for you over your life.

The real deciding factor for how much money they make after the end of the series is how much money the show can generate in syndication. Certain shows like the Simpsons, Friends, and Seinfeld, have been syndicated on so many networks for so many years that it would have generated a huge amount of money for everyone involved.
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So basically, even though he's a crap actor and no future career prospects, Matt Leblanc is set for life thanks to ten years on Friends. :D
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Talamasca wrote:
May 29th, 2010 11:21 pm
So basically, even though he's a crap actor and no future career prospects, Matt Leblanc is set for life thanks to ten years on Friends. :D
How about those random reoccurring characters like the coffee shop guy? I wonder how well off they are for being a minor guy but re-occurring in a very successful sitcom.
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UrbanPoet wrote:
May 30th, 2010 3:39 am
How about those random reoccurring characters like the coffee shop guy? I wonder how well off they are for being a minor guy but re-occurring in a very successful sitcom.
I bet he does, sounds like even crew members get it, one of the quotes above
"The other 20% is paid to the various performers and off-camera crew".
Man, only in Hollywood do you still get paid for something you did 10 years ago!
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