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How much should an air exchanger installed cost in the region of Ottawa region?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 13th, 2019 1:31 pm
[OP]
Member
Aug 27, 2014
251 posts
131 upvotes

How much should an air exchanger installed cost in the region of Ottawa region?

I actually live in Gatineau but it's always easier to get information about the Ottawa region in general.

Looking to get an air exchanger with heat recovery installed in my furnace room. Everything (HVAC, walls) should be fairly accessible.

I don't know how much to budget but may want to get something installed.

I've been curious about getting one and the RenoClimat (provincial subsidy program, offering $490 for this) person told me an air exchanger (with heat recovery) would greatly help with comfort and lowering humidity levels (even though my thermostat indicates that it is in the 20%, I don't know how right this number is...).

Thanks

Edit: Just wanted to add that I have a ~1500 sqft two-storey house, so I likely don't need something very powerful. Last year I needed to purchase a gas furnace, and there was a wide disparity in price between one salesman who wanted to sell something much more powerful (equal to what Enbridge/Gazifere had installed in the house when it got built) and price than the second salesman.
Last edited by LuxErus on Jan 9th, 2019 10:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
10 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 15, 2013
1607 posts
979 upvotes
Ottawa
Budget around $2-3K fully installed. Go with Lifebreath, a trusted brand.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
25695 posts
11865 upvotes
Ottawa
You're looking for a whole home HRV/ERV setup and it's going to be tough as that requires installation of new duct work to suck in the "stale" air.
[OP]
Member
Aug 27, 2014
251 posts
131 upvotes
vkizzle wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 11:47 am
You're looking for a whole home HRV/ERV setup and it's going to be tough as that requires installation of new duct work to suck in the "stale" air.
I'm not sure what you mean, I already have air returns on each floor for the furnace. I would need extra returns? I thought the air exchanger would just work with the ducts I already have.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
25695 posts
11865 upvotes
Ottawa
My "whole home" HRV includes additional vents in all of the bedrooms and it replaced the traditional fan exhausts in the washrooms.
Member
Sep 29, 2015
251 posts
65 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
What year was your house built?

Have you upgraded the windows? added insulation in your attic? do you know how much is up there now?
Do you know if you have a fresh air intake/duct running from the outside to the cold air return now?

You said your humidity is 20% right now?
[OP]
Member
Aug 27, 2014
251 posts
131 upvotes
davidmr wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 1:23 pm
What year was your house built?

Have you upgraded the windows? added insulation in your attic? do you know how much is up there now?
Do you know if you have a fresh air intake/duct running from the outside to the cold air return now?

You said your humidity is 20% right now?
House was built in 1993.

I haven't upgraded the windows.

R-30 in attic (cellulose), I want to upgrade to R-60.

I have a fresh air intake emptying next to the furnace. The furnace takes its air from the room. I've been told that this could have been installed so that the furnace takes its air directly from outside...

Humidity right now is unknown, I'm not at home, haha. But thermostat is typically in the range of 20%, but I don't closely monitor that number. It does feel a bit cold in the home even if I make the temperature climb to 25.
The basement has been re-insulated (r-24 on the walls, polyurethane foam in the joists and around windows), and now feels more comfortable than the ground floor. Reading about how heat leaves though the attic and creates negative pressure in the lower floors, I wonder if the air that used to enter through the basement rim joists and windows is now entering through cracks around the ground floor windows and outlets. I'll work on sealing the cracks when I get more free time.

I may get new windows this year or the one after.
Member
Sep 29, 2015
251 posts
65 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
I dont think a HRV or ERV is going to help you much in the winter. A house with low humidity is generally a leaky house, which means its already ventilated enough.

Oh and your furnace should be getting its fresh air from the outside not the room.
LuxErus wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 1:35 pm
House was built in 1993.

I haven't upgraded the windows.

R-30 in attic (cellulose), I want to upgrade to R-60.

I have a fresh air intake emptying next to the furnace. The furnace takes its air from the room. I've been told that this could have been installed so that the furnace takes its air directly from outside...

Humidity right now is unknown, I'm not at home, haha. But thermostat is typically in the range of 20%, but I don't closely monitor that number. It does feel a bit cold in the home even if I make the temperature climb to 25.
The basement has been re-insulated (r-24 on the walls, polyurethane foam in the joists and around windows), and now feels more comfortable than the ground floor. Reading about how heat leaves though the attic and creates negative pressure in the lower floors, I wonder if the air that used to enter through the basement rim joists and windows is now entering through cracks around the ground floor windows and outlets. I'll work on sealing the cracks when I get more free time.

I may get new windows this year or the one after.
Newbie
Jul 4, 2012
39 posts
7 upvotes
OTTAWA
I got a lifebreath erv installed in my townhouse in Kanata for 2100 + hst about 2 months ago. Hrv would have been 1700.
[OP]
Member
Aug 27, 2014
251 posts
131 upvotes
davidmr wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 5:43 pm
I dont think a HRV or ERV is going to help you much in the winter. A house with low humidity is generally a leaky house, which means its already ventilated enough.

Oh and your furnace should be getting its fresh air from the outside not the room.
I've been told my house was fairly tight despite obvious leaks having been found. I got an air change rate of 3.8 ACH at 50 Pa. And I know this WILL go lower as I work on making some modifications to the house.

I got a new hygrometer and it's showing 50% humidity instead of the 24% the furnace thermostat (Lennox branded) is showing. I've put the hygrometer virtually next to the thermostat. Now I need a third thermostat to know which one is correct... I do get condensations in my 25 year old windows, but there are a few air leaks around them and the glass is very cold to the touch.

I understand that the furnace should ideally take its air outside, but then should the water heater also gets its fresh air from outside too? Because right now the fresh air intake is feeding the whole furnace room. I'm also not sure if I should complain to the company that installed the furnace over a year ago. If I get people to install an HRV, I'm thinking they can probably fix that easily.

Thanks!
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
1701 posts
1205 upvotes
LuxErus wrote:
Jan 13th, 2019 12:52 pm

I understand that the furnace should ideally take its air outside, but then should the water heater also gets its fresh air from outside too? Because right now the fresh air intake is feeding the whole furnace room. I'm also not sure if I should complain to the company that installed the furnace over a year ago. If I get people to install an HRV, I'm thinking they can probably fix that easily.
It depends on the furnace. Some furnace are directly connected to the outside for fresh air, while others have outside air flowing freely near the furnace. I've seen both types.
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