Automotive

How is no one outraged by the Gas Prices?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 18th, 2015 6:48 pm
Tags:
None
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 19, 2001
8030 posts
1673 upvotes
b166er1337 wrote:
Jun 25th, 2015 9:51 pm
I'm in the same boat.
Looks Tesla Model 3 and GM Bolt will be big sellers in 2017/2018 onward.

doubt it "In fact, more U.S. car buyers are trading in hybrid and electric cars for gas-guzzling SUVs, according to car-buying platform Edmunds.com.
About 22 per cent of people who have traded in their hybrids and EVs in 2015 bought a new SUV. That’s up from 18.8 per cent the previous year and nearly double the rate of three years ago, Edmunds.com said in April."
http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/06 ... lling.html

22,000,000 conventional gas cars in canada, 4000 pure evs
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 24, 2015
1032 posts
224 upvotes
Fort Mac, AB/Lambton…
Quentin5 wrote:
Jun 25th, 2015 10:05 pm
Explain this genius, the experts disagree with the scientician
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/gas-pri ... -1.3120038
The experts were saying exactly what I've been saying. It's just tough to calculate the extent to which demand, currency exchange, and fixed costs affect gas prices. All I've done is taken guesses that are based on knowns from past data. Those past knowns are forever fluctuating. But my guesses have proven quite accurate in explaining costs of gas at different oil prices, consumer demands, and currency exchanges. Deviations from expected can easily be due to other factors that I did not consider. I've already stated several times that oil companies are probably trying to get higher margins from their gas retailers to compensate for low oil prices, but I think that has a very small affect, as the numbers illustrate.

Really, you're asserting that gas prices cannot be explained by market pressures, and that there's something more going on. That's actually the far-fetched explanation. Gas is probably one of the most competitively priced items. It's highly unlikely that gas would deviate from fair prices, yet you're asserting that with no evidence to support your cause, other than a bad feeling based on your poor understanding of the economics of gas.

Edit: and the only one in that article stating that gas prices are amiss is the writer, not the experts.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
15979 posts
5217 upvotes
justaskthescientician wrote:
Jun 26th, 2015 12:54 am
The experts were saying exactly what I've been saying. It's just tough to calculate the extent to which demand, currency exchange, and fixed costs affect gas prices. All I've done is taken guesses that are based on knowns from past data. Those past knowns are forever fluctuating. But my guesses have proven quite accurate in explaining costs of gas at different oil prices, consumer demands, and currency exchanges. Deviations from expected can easily be due to other factors that I did not consider. I've already stated several times that oil companies are probably trying to get higher margins from their gas retailers to compensate for low oil prices, but I think that has a very small affect.

Really, you're asserting that gas prices cannot be explained by market pressures, and that there's something more going on. That's actually the far-fetched explanation. Gas is probably one of the most competitively priced items. It's highly unlikely that gas would deviate from fair prices, yet you're asserting that with no evidence to support your cause. Other than a bad feeling based on your poor understanding of the economics of gas.
You accuse me of poor understanding of economics but refuse to believe common sense. Your naiveness is not my problem.
In Japan, the hand can be used like a knife.
But this method doesn't work with a tomato...
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 24, 2015
1032 posts
224 upvotes
Fort Mac, AB/Lambton…
Quentin5 wrote:
Jun 26th, 2015 12:56 am
You accuse me of poor understanding of economics but refuse to believe common sense. Your naiveness is not my problem.
You didn't acknowledge any of the factors at play, e.g. consumer demand, fixed costs, currency exchange rates. You don't know enough to have an opinion.
Moderator
User avatar
Sep 21, 2004
10015 posts
4031 upvotes
Calgary
zoro69 wrote:
Jun 25th, 2015 10:24 pm
doubt it "In fact, more U.S. car buyers are trading in hybrid and electric cars for gas-guzzling SUVs, according to car-buying platform Edmunds.com.
About 22 per cent of people who have traded in their hybrids and EVs in 2015 bought a new SUV. That’s up from 18.8 per cent the previous year and nearly double the rate of three years ago, Edmunds.com said in April."
http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/06 ... lling.html

22,000,000 conventional gas cars in canada, 4000 pure evs
Yes that's true. Unfortunately people tend to have short term memory. I wonder how those Canadians feel now after rushing to buy SUV when gas was price was low earlier this year.

But anyway, affordable EV is a couple years away. Hybrid is compromise between ICE and EV and are boring to drive. I know there is a lot of interest for Model 3 if it is $45k in Canada.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
23311 posts
2827 upvotes
Montreal
b166er1337 wrote:
Jun 26th, 2015 1:08 am
Yes that's true. Unfortunately people tend to have short term memory. I wonder how those Canadians feel now after rushing to buy SUV when gas was price was low earlier this year.

But anyway, affordable EV is a couple years away. Hybrid is compromise between ICE and EV and are boring to drive. I know there is a lot of interest for Model 3 if it is $45k in Canada.
The Model 3 will likely hit 50k in Canada. 60k without incentives. That's more than a BMW 335i. Very difficult to justify. The next gen Leaf, Bolt, and Volt are the ones to look out for. If BMW made the i3 less goofy, I'd consider it too.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 7, 2012
32228 posts
8524 upvotes
GTHA
blaznazn22 wrote:
Jun 21st, 2015 11:16 pm
ok, lets make this clear: Gasoline in buffalo, new york is selling for $2.60/gallon. I chose buffalo because of its close proximity to toronto which would eliminate all other factors, including refining costs and transportation. $2.60 per gallon is roughly equal to $0.69 USD per liter. Converting that to canadian gives you $0.85 canadian per liter. Its true that we pay higher taxes on gasoline, but so does the US. The difference in our taxes and US taxes on gasoline is probably not more than $0.20 per liter, so adding that to what we have would give a total of $1.05/L of gasoline. Why are we paying an extra $1.20/L?? Who is milking us and where is it going??
The Real Reason U.S. Gas Is So Cheap Is Americans Don't Pay the True Cost of Driving
A gas tax that fully corrected for the social impact of car reliance would upend life as we know it.

Top