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How to pursue jobs outside of Canada?

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  • Aug 15th, 2008 4:24 pm
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Jun 18, 2008
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How to pursue jobs outside of Canada?

How do I get a job outside of Canada, particular in the United Kingdom, Australia, European countries?

Do I basically find the equivalent of workopolis, monster, etc? Do I have to visit the area?

I know many people have found jobs in America (Google, [rfdlink=3]Amazon[/rfdlink], MS), but I believe that those companies specifically come to campus and recruit. But I don't think that really works for these countries, and the major I'm in (Industrial Engineering).


If anyone could shed some light, it'd be much appreciated. Thanks.
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May 18, 2006
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start by researching the industries u like, have a knack for and have the requisite strengths for;

keep in mind embassies; govt websites, trade shows, how about a subsidiary for the company u r working for now or have worked for'; apply directly and perhaps if u have already received numerous training here/locally the antenna cie may find u an asset, too many ideas,

as everyone says, google is your friend.

good luck to you......
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Mar 12, 2008
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DeltasInTheSky wrote:
Aug 10th, 2008 11:41 pm
How do I get a job outside of Canada, particular in the United Kingdom, Australia, European countries?

Do I basically find the equivalent of workopolis, monster, etc? Do I have to visit the area?

I know many people have found jobs in America (Google, Amazon, MS), but I believe that those companies specifically come to campus and recruit. But I don't think that really works for these countries, and the major I'm in (Industrial Engineering).


If anyone could shed some light, it'd be much appreciated. Thanks.
Job hunting in the UK and US is in many ways just the same as hunting for jobs in another city and another province. You use sites like Monster, you visit the web pages of firms, you e-mail them, you call them. No harm in emailing a firm in Memphis, Manchester, or Melbourne, if they've got an opening for your skill set.

See if they'll recognize your credentials, whether they'd assist you with moving expenses, getting working visa.

I would definitely visit if they offer, just to make sure you know what you're committing to. There is a risk of you hating the company/town/country/culture/lifestyle. Also, you might feel real homesick if you've never traveled before.

Other big issues are getting working visas and other documents required for foreigners working in the country.
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I was planning on writing a big FAQ for my friends about finding a job in Europe. But I suppose I can share a little insight.

I just landed a job in Germany with a large chemical company. It took me about 6 months. It was hell trying to find something...but remember, you just need that 1 employer to hire you. They paid for all my relocation costs (furniture, clothes, etc), work visa, residence permit, an agent to take me around to find an apartment, license transfer (to a German one), and enrolled me in a month of German lessons at Berlitz (I'm writing this right now).

No, I don't have a lot of experience. I just finished school in December 07, so, not too long ago.

It's been crazy and a frightful experience. I wouldn't give it up for anything in the world. Will write more about this later when I get home. I'll put down all the sites I used. Google is only your friend for preliminary research. For the actual jobs, there are other sites that are more useful.
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First thing I'd look into is work permits. Depending on your education, age, ancestors you can have different (or no) options.
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Thanks guys. Thanks in advance to Aristophanes too!
michelb wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 10:03 am
First thing I'd look into is work permits. Depending on your education, age, ancestors you can have different (or no) options.
I have a fair bit of family in England, my dad has citizenship (as well as my Grandma), if I recall correctly.
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For you, I'd recommend getting into a large company first. Work for a few years and then request a transfer to England.
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Aristophanes wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 4:39 am
I was planning on writing a big FAQ for my friends about finding a job in Europe. But I suppose I can share a little insight.

I just landed a job in Germany with a large chemical company. It took me about 6 months. It was hell trying to find something...but remember, you just need that 1 employer to hire you. They paid for all my relocation costs (furniture, clothes, etc), work visa, residence permit, an agent to take me around to find an apartment, license transfer (to a German one), and enrolled me in a month of German lessons at Berlitz (I'm writing this right now).

No, I don't have a lot of experience. I just finished school in December 07, so, not too long ago.

It's been crazy and a frightful experience. I wouldn't give it up for anything in the world. Will write more about this later when I get home. I'll put down all the sites I used. Google is only your friend for preliminary research. For the actual jobs, there are other sites that are more useful.
I hope you post this FAQ soon!
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michelb wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 10:03 am
First thing I'd look into is work permits. Depending on your education, age, ancestors you can have different (or no) options.
The UK, at least, has (or had, as of a couple of years ago) a working holiday visa program for Canadians which allows those under 30 or so to work for up to a year as part of a long vacation, and I believe Australia does too; so applying for such a visa may be a good solution if you're of the right age group. That would allow you to go there and find a job which might then be upgraded to a full work permit if you decided to stay.

However, if your dad really is a UK citizen, then I believe you can get a UK passport and would then be able to work anywhere in the EU, though I'm not sure of the details of how foreign children of UK citizens are handled.
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IBOPM wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 12:12 pm
I hope you post this FAQ soon!
Guys, I didn't have time to finish editing down the FAQ (private details, blah blah blah). I'll keep it abbreviated. Lots of German hwk tonight. I promise to have something tomorrow - including the German job sites that I used to secure my position here and other useful resources.

Bis dann!
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I would begin by going to your career services office, and getting all the information. I know mine has a whole guide with tons of information with getting jobs in specific sectors overseas. From there joining an organization that promotes international work for students is your best bet.

I know in the international info guide at our school, it said the key things, are to figure out;

1) How flexible you are?
2) Do you want an international career, or just to experience something for a couple years?
3) Targeting specific regions.

Its also recommend you start latest in 3rd year, as this actually requires alot of work to find a good position.

The other path I know some people who this year in 3rd year, talk to some of our professors who work overseas and got some connections that way.
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Aristophanes wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 3:59 pm
Guys, I didn't have time to finish editing down the FAQ (private details, blah blah blah). I'll keep it abbreviated. Lots of German hwk tonight. I promise to have something tomorrow - including the German job sites that I used to secure my position here and other useful resources.

Bis dann!
I think you really should not waste your time reinventing the wheel, if your quite busy. There is alot of resources out there at career services offices and on US organizations. I think your time is better spent answering specific question people have after doing their own research.
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Aristophanes wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 4:39 am
I was planning on writing a big FAQ for my friends about finding a job in Europe. But I suppose I can share a little insight.

I just landed a job in Germany with a large chemical company. It took me about 6 months. It was hell trying to find something...but remember, you just need that 1 employer to hire you. They paid for all my relocation costs (furniture, clothes, etc), work visa, residence permit, an agent to take me around to find an apartment, license transfer (to a German one), and enrolled me in a month of German lessons at Berlitz (I'm writing this right now).

No, I don't have a lot of experience. I just finished school in December 07, so, not too long ago.

It's been crazy and a frightful experience. I wouldn't give it up for anything in the world. Will write more about this later when I get home. I'll put down all the sites I used. Google is only your friend for preliminary research. For the actual jobs, there are other sites that are more useful.
Whoah, I am surprised that you were able to get an employer to relocate you even though you finished school so recently. I was always under the impression that, unless you have a lot of experience and/or were in highly specialized or in demand field, companies would rather deal with local applicants -- or somewhat closer applicants.

May I ask what field you're in/educational background?

I really want to relocate for a job but the problem is, I graduated university in '06 and I am not really experienced/in a field like engineering, etc, so I think it's doubtful any company will consider relocating me let alone consider my applications.
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movieman wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 2:24 pm
The UK, at least, has (or had, as of a couple of years ago) a working holiday visa program for Canadians which allows those under 30 or so to work for up to a year as part of a long vacation, and I believe Australia does too; so applying for such a visa may be a good solution if you're of the right age group. That would allow you to go there and find a job which might then be upgraded to a full work permit if you decided to stay.

However, if your dad really is a UK citizen, then I believe you can get a UK passport and would then be able to work anywhere in the EU, though I'm not sure of the details of how foreign children of UK citizens are handled.
Yes, several countries have 'work holiday visas' but age varies and it may not be suitable for everyone (e.g. for Australia it's for 18 to 30 year olds but you cannot stay with the same employer for more than 6 months (which depending on the industry might be a problem).

You definitely need to confirm these things before as 'upgrading' to full work permit might be a big task (my friend got an Australian work visa but I believe it cost him several thousand dollars and it took a long time to get it. Also he might not have been allowed to stay in Australia while the application was pending).

For UK citizenship, I believe that you might need to apply for a UK passport before you turn 18 and if you don't / didn't, you might not qualify (my wife has a British passport for this reason I believe).
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rockthecasbah wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 6:24 pm

May I ask what field you're in/educational background?
BSc from UT
MBA from McMaster (continued right after undergrad)
adehbone wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 6:12 pm
I think you really should not waste your time reinventing the wheel, if your quite busy. There is alot of resources out there at career services offices and on US organizations. I think your time is better spent answering specific question people have after doing their own research.
That's a good idea. I've been exhausted everyday. I thought I could have something for yesterday but didn't. You're absolutely correct, a starting point for me was through career services offices.

I'll create a new thread where people can ask specific questions and I'll address them the best I can.
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