Computers & Electronics

how to wire phone jack for dsl?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 3rd, 2011 8:06 pm
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[OP]
Member
Apr 16, 2011
273 posts
7 upvotes
Toronto

how to wire phone jack for dsl?

alright, i just baught the DSL + dry loop from Teksavvy for my business. The bell technician came by and installed the dry loop only to find out they don't install it to the phone jacks and i have to pay $110 to Teksavvy for the installation... So i decided to just do it myself, how hard can it be. Does anyone have advice, how to tutorial or a link to a good tutorial? Help much appreciated.

Thanks
7 replies
Deal Guru
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Feb 24, 2007
10777 posts
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Richmond Hill
My advice covers the standard 4-wire telephone cable (which is still most common). If your residence has a newer 8-conductor connection we'll need some pics then.

On the old 4-wire cable, the signal is provided through two individual pairs ( red/green and yellow/black). The active pair is red/green which is what you normally have connected behind your telephone jack. You might see all four conductors connected but only one is working if you do not have an active two-line service into your home.

Now, the NID that you'll be using for your pc connection , you'll have to remove red/green pair and replace it with yellow/black pair. The back plate of dsl jack has appropriate markings for wire colours (R)- Red; (B)-Black; (Y)-Yellow and (G)-Green.

Replace red conductor with yellow and green with black.
If you need to strip a wire, use a good quality wire strippers. Try not to "short" the wires when doing this work.

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Don't argue with THEM, get EVEN!! ;) :D

RFD's member NewEgg experience
[OP]
Member
Apr 16, 2011
273 posts
7 upvotes
Toronto
this got me confused. Well i have 2 options now. Either install my own jack right at the demarco point or convert one of my phone wires from being a phone line into a dsl line because what i tried was to make a phone line and dsl line run through 1 phone wire which does not work.

I been trying to install my own jack directly to the demarco point and all i have is a simple jack backplate with the primary and secondary wires, real short wires, connected to 4 individual screws on the back. I disconnected the black/yellow from the screws and connected them to the demarco point, didn't work hmm...
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 20, 2009
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Vancouver
Nothing to be confused about. Phone service and/or DSL service travels on a single pair of wires, traditionally coloured red and green in your telephone wiring. If you hook the red and green wires from the outside phone network to the red and green wires on your inside wiring, then you will have phone and/or DSL service on all connected jacks.

There is traditionally a second "spare" set of wires in case you want to add a 2nd line, coloured yellow and black. You can ignore them unless you want to make use of them for some reason.

One reason why you might want to make use of the spare 2nd line wiring is if you have dry-loop DSL and you also want to use your internal phone jacks to connect your phones to an ATA for internet phone service. You can keep the two services separate by using both lines in your internal wiring. That's what eldiablo is suggesting above. You could connect the red+green wires from the dry-loop DSL connection to the yellow+black 2nd-line wires of your inside wiring. That way your phones could continue to use your internal 1st-line wiring to connect to the ATA for internet phone service, but your DSL modem could use the 2nd-line wiring to connect separately to the dry-loop DSL service. You would need to buy or wire a special 2nd-line phone cord to connect your DSL modem to the wall jack so that it connects to the yellow+black wires, but that's easy enough.
Deal Addict
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Aug 19, 2003
3419 posts
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Kingston
Installing phone jacks are really simple. If you dont have any jacks in the house already I suggest getting some cat5 or cat6 and running it right from the demarcation point. Most houses nowadays are using that cable instead of regular phone line. Run a cable straight to where you want it going the shortest way possible. It doesnt matter what wire colours you use as long as they match on the both sides. If you want to add telephone lines later on, run a separate line from demarc, dont branch off your dsl line. That will give you the best connection possible.

If you have telephone line already wired through your house try using that first, if your having connection issues and weak signal run the new line. Depending on how old the wiring is there may be problems or there might not be. If possible check your line stats if you have a modem that can do that for you.
SNR
SNR means Signal to Noise Ratio. Simply put divide the Signal value by Noise Value and you get SNR. You need high SNR for a stable connection. In general, a higher signal to noise ratio will result in less errors.

6bB. or below = Bad and will experience no line synchronisation and frequent disconnections
7dB-10dB. = Fair but does not leave much room for variances in conditions.
11dB-20dB. = Good with little or no disconnection problems
20dB-28dB. = Excellent
29dB. or above = Outstanding

Line Attenuation
In gerneral, attenuation is the loss of signal over distance. Unfortunately, dB loss is not just dependent on distance. It also depends on cable type and gauge (which can differ over the length of the cable), the number and location other connection points on the cable.

20bB. and below = Outstanding
20dB-30dB. = Excellent
30dB-40dB. = Very Good
40dB-50dB. = Good
50dB-60dB. = Poor and may experience connectivity issues
60dB. and above = Bad and will experience connectivity issues

Line attenuation also affects your speed.
75 dB+: Out of range for broadband
60-75 dB: max speed up to 512kbps
43-60dB: max speed up to 1Mbps
0-42dB: speed up to 2Mbps+
Deal Fanatic
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Apr 4, 2009
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North York
terren99 wrote:
Jun 30th, 2011 4:00 pm
alright, i just baught the DSL + dry loop from Teksavvy for my business. The bell technician came by and installed the dry loop only to find out they don't install it to the phone jacks and i have to pay $110 to Teksavvy for the installation... So i decided to just do it myself, how hard can it be. Does anyone have advice, how to tutorial or a link to a good tutorial? Help much appreciated.

Thanks

This is for a business? You want to save $110?

My question is can your business live without reliable internet? Are you prepared to trouble shoot if there are probelms? Do you have the time? If yes then go ahead try this yourself.

If no, get the professionals to do it so if there is a problem you can drag them back in and fix it. Otherwise it is endless finger pointing and frustration.
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Oct 15, 2005
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Busybuyer888 wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2011 9:45 pm
This is for a business? You want to save $110?

My question is can your business live without reliable internet? Are you prepared to trouble shoot if there are probelms? Do you have the time? If yes then go ahead try this yourself.

If no, get the professionals to do it so if there is a problem you can drag them back in and fix it. Otherwise it is endless finger pointing and frustration.

are you kidding me??
wiring jacks is bell's bread and butter.
110 for the first jack then 65 dollars per jack after that plus the hourly wage... no thanks.
you do realize the parts needed to wire a jack up is like less then 5 bucks.
[OP]
Member
Apr 16, 2011
273 posts
7 upvotes
Toronto
infamouskid wrote:
Jul 3rd, 2011 3:45 am
are you kidding me??
wiring jacks is bell's bread and butter.
110 for the first jack then 65 dollars per jack after that plus the hourly wage... no thanks.
you do realize the parts needed to wire a jack up is like less then 5 bucks.

yep thats what teksavvy told me to do. why would u pay 110 for it when you can do it yourself. Heck, teksavvy said they will guide me through it, i just have to ask for the same person. I wish there was a better diagram to help me out though.
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