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How would I word this to possible employer's HR?

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  • Nov 9th, 2017 5:07 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 29, 2012
972 posts
140 upvotes
Vancouver

How would I word this to possible employer's HR?

I've been working 12 hour days and not getting enough sleep because of my 3 hr (in total) commutes to work, so I might not be thinking clearly.

I applied to a job that I want. HR contacted me through email, so I contacted him back stating my availability. The next day he emailed me back "I'm doing tours and interviews today, can you come in?" At that time I was at work so I missed the email, I missed it the second day as well because I get a lot of emails from different websites. It's been 3 days since.

I want to email him back something like, "Sorry, I'm still working full-time at my current job so I missed the interview, if possible could I come in sometime next week?"

Is that alright? Not too demanding? I also want to give at least 3 days-a week's notice at my current job since i'm sort of a core guy in the workplace. But that's not too much of an issue because I want the job.

I think I would get the job because I have 5 years experience in the field already, it's just I feel I don't want to ruin it because of miscommunication. I've had that happen before through email twice, I think some older people just take what happens through text a little too "rough."
17 replies
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2005
4521 posts
495 upvotes
SquirreI wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 8:05 am
I've been working 12 hour days and not getting enough sleep because of my 3 hr (in total) commutes to work, so I might not be thinking clearly.

I applied to a job that I want. HR contacted me through email, so I contacted him back stating my availability. The next day he emailed me back "I'm doing tours and interviews today, can you come in?" At that time I was at work so I missed the email, I missed it the second day as well because I get a lot of emails from different websites. It's been 3 days since.

I want to email him back something like, "Sorry, I'm still working full-time at my current job so I missed the interview, if possible could I come in sometime next week?"

Is that alright? Not too demanding? I also want to give at least 3 days-a week's notice at my current job since i'm sort of a core guy in the workplace. But that's not too much of an issue because I want the job.

I think I would get the job because I have 5 years experience in the field already, it's just I feel I don't want to ruin it because of miscommunication. I've had that happen before through email twice, I think some older people just take what happens through text a little too "rough."
I wouldn't apologize as that's an odd way to arrange an interview, seems too casual. Simply email him back asking for a follow-up. And don't make assumptions that you could easily get the job, confidence is fine though.
"Talent gets you in the door. Character keeps you in the room."
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 29, 2012
972 posts
140 upvotes
Vancouver
blexann wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 8:15 am
I wouldn't apologize as that's an odd way to arrange an interview, seems too casual. Simply email him back asking for a follow-up. And don't make assumptions that you could easily get the job, confidence is fine though.
"Hello John,

I'm still working full-time at my current job, and happened to miss the interview. If there is still a position for me available, I would be able to come in given sufficient notice.

Thanks,
Bob"

Would that be better? I feel like i'm terribly bad at this...
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2005
4521 posts
495 upvotes
SquirreI wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 8:24 am
"Hello John,

I'm still working full-time at my current job, and happened to miss the interview. If there is still a position for me available, I would be able to come in given sufficient notice.

Thanks,
Bob"

Would that be better? I feel like i'm terribly bad at this...
That's fine. One way or the other you need to connect with him - you will know if he wants you badly enough
"Talent gets you in the door. Character keeps you in the room."
Deal Fanatic
Mar 15, 2005
5108 posts
662 upvotes
SquirreI wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 8:24 am
"Hello John,

I'm still working full-time at my current job, and happened to miss the interview. If there is still a position for me available, I would be able to come in given sufficient notice.

Thanks,
Bob"

Would that be better? I feel like i'm terribly bad at this...
I would reword that not to use the phrase "I missed the interview".

That sounds like the ball was dropped by you, when in reality it was just some miscommunication by someone trying to short book you.
Newbie
Jul 1, 2017
79 posts
42 upvotes
I think this is a good applied reason for why you do not mix business with personal emails; I have 4 different email accounts, but only use two. One, for everything, the other for job applications and correspondence with recruiters.

I don't fully agree with HR arranging an interview by email unless this is the only medium you provided them with in your application. You cannot fault a someone for missing an email; on that, I'd email them back and be truthful:

"Hi ___,

I appreciate the opportunity to meet with your team and I have availability on _____. As I am currently employed and it is a busy time of year for us, I would need a few days notice.

Thanks again for the opportunity,

____"

Don't apologize.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 29, 2012
972 posts
140 upvotes
Vancouver
HelloWorld3 wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 11:15 am
I think this is a good applied reason for why you do not mix business with personal emails; I have 4 different email accounts, but only use two. One, for everything, the other for job applications and correspondence with recruiters.

I don't fully agree with HR arranging an interview by email unless this is the only medium you provided them with in your application. You cannot fault a someone for missing an email; on that, I'd email them back and be truthful:

"Hi ___,

I appreciate the opportunity to meet with your team and I have availability on _____. As I am currently employed and it is a busy time of year for us, I would need a few days notice.

Thanks again for the opportunity,

____"

Don't apologize.
Thanks, that helps a lot.

He didn't even call me once, I provided two phone numbers, so I assume he mainly uses email as the primary means of communication. Which I have no problem with, I check my email everyday, usually, it's just he didn't give me enough notice. "I have tours and interviews today at 2pm, if you could come in that would be great." I don't know how anyone could come in with such short notice. Unless they were unemployed, checking their email every hour or so.
Deal Addict
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Mar 31, 2005
3280 posts
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Calgary
SquirreI wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 9:28 pm
Thanks, that helps a lot.

He didn't even call me once, I provided two phone numbers, so I assume he mainly uses email as the primary means of communication. Which I have no problem with, I check my email everyday, usually, it's just he didn't give me enough notice. "I have tours and interviews today at 2pm, if you could come in that would be great." I don't know how anyone could come in with such short notice. Unless they were unemployed, checking their email every hour or so.
While that may sound reasonable, you also have to remember that you missed the interview and have now waited 3 days without contacting them.

I can see this being interpreted in a few ways:

- You are too disorganized, which is why you missed the email. (it should be considered normal job hunting skills to have tags or folders/rules in your email so you know who you've applied to, who has responded, etc. "too many emails" is a horrible excuse.)
- You don't care enough about the job to keep tabs on it throughout your day. Or even over the course of 2 days. If you are applying to jobs you should be checking your email every hour or so. Or at least at the start of your day and a couple of times after that.
- You don't really need the job. (the more you state the "I'm at my full-time job" phrase the more it sounds like you are putting the new potential employer on the back burner.)

No matter how good or bad the hiring manager is, it's still their game that you have to play.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
1944 posts
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Toronto
TotallyKiller wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 2:54 pm
While that may sound reasonable, you also have to remember that you missed the interview and have now waited 3 days without contacting them.

I can see this being interpreted in a few ways:

- You are too disorganized, which is why you missed the email. (it should be considered normal job hunting skills to have tags or folders/rules in your email so you know who you've applied to, who has responded, etc. "too many emails" is a horrible excuse.)
- You don't care enough about the job to keep tabs on it throughout your day. Or even over the course of 2 days. If you are applying to jobs you should be checking your email every hour or so. Or at least at the start of your day and a couple of times after that.
- You don't really need the job. (the more you state the "I'm at my full-time job" phrase the more it sounds like you are putting the new potential employer on the back burner.)

No matter how good or bad the hiring manager is, it's still their game that you have to play.
For some reason, when I don't care about the job too much, the employers would email me more than once regarding my availability. The fact that I put these job postings "on the back burner" tells them that I should be on their candidate list. The ones constantly looking at their email waiting for replies tells the employers that they have the upper-hand during compensation negotiation as you want to get out of your current company ASAP.
Newbie
Jul 1, 2017
79 posts
42 upvotes
TotallyKiller wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 2:54 pm
While that may sound reasonable, you also have to remember that you missed the interview and have now waited 3 days without contacting them.

I can see this being interpreted in a few ways:

- You are too disorganized, which is why you missed the email. (it should be considered normal job hunting skills to have tags or folders/rules in your email so you know who you've applied to, who has responded, etc. "too many emails" is a horrible excuse.)
- You don't care enough about the job to keep tabs on it throughout your day. Or even over the course of 2 days. If you are applying to jobs you should be checking your email every hour or so. Or at least at the start of your day and a couple of times after that.
- You don't really need the job. (the more you state the "I'm at my full-time job" phrase the more it sounds like you are putting the new potential employer on the back burner.)

No matter how good or bad the hiring manager is, it's still their game that you have to play.
You're right - so what happens if you get an email that says "we are doing interviews tomorrow; what time can you come in?" and read this two or three days later? If the recruiter couldn't be bothered to call you - you don't apologize because you didn't agree to anything. A reply along the lines of "I am interested in the opportunity and I have availability over ______; does this work for you?" is more than fine.

Personal preference - I'm not a fan of people apologizing for no reason; they come across as weak.
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Mar 31, 2005
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blitzforce wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 2:58 pm
For some reason, when I don't care about the job too much, the employers would email me more than once regarding my availability. The fact that I put these job postings "on the back burner" tells them that I should be on their candidate list. The ones constantly looking at their email waiting for replies tells the employers that they have the upper-hand during compensation negotiation as you want to get out of your current company ASAP.
I think you have a twisted sense of how this works and how they interpret you and your actions. I don't understand your thinking. You think that they would want you more if you pay less attention to them? But then state that the people who do will have less bargaining power? And think that's somehow seen as a bad thing to them? These seem contradictory and dangerously ignorant. Playing "hard to get" doesn't work unless you are the only candidate in a super specialized field and have multiple offers. What you described is more likely to be taken as either "I'm too disorganized to keep track" or "I don't care enough to keep track". Neither of them is something you want from a candidate. In my experience, someone who misses an interview and doesn't call that day to fix the issue and arrange for an alternate time is likely off the list. After 2-3 days you're likely dead to them.

Whatever you do, do it today or don't bother.
Member
May 12, 2011
263 posts
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TORONTO
TotallyKiller wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 3:25 pm
I think you have a twisted sense of how this works and how they interpret you and your actions. I don't understand your thinking. You think that they would want you more if you pay less attention to them? But then state that the people who do will have less bargaining power? And think that's somehow seen as a bad thing to them? These seem contradictory and dangerously ignorant. Playing "hard to get" doesn't work unless you are the only candidate in a super specialized field and have multiple offers. What you described is more likely to be taken as either "I'm too disorganized to keep track" or "I don't care enough to keep track". Neither of them is something you want from a candidate. In my experience, someone who misses an interview and doesn't call that day to fix the issue and arrange for an alternate time is likely off the list. After 2-3 days you're likely dead to them.
This would be my thinking too, but there may be something to the other opinion. I once pulled out of a job competition because there were a boatload of red flags. HR practically begged me to reconsider, but I stuck to my guns (I diplomatically never said it was because of their red flags). About six weeks later, they contacted me again, wanting to know if I'd reconsider. Crazy, right? You'd think that flatly turning them down once would have been the end of it. Maybe it's the "treat 'em mean & keep 'em keen" thing, or the "I wouldn't want to join a club that would have me as a member" thing. Problem is, you can never tell which type you're dealing with.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
1944 posts
310 upvotes
Toronto
TotallyKiller wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 3:25 pm
I think you have a twisted sense of how this works and how they interpret you and your actions. I don't understand your thinking. You think that they would want you more if you pay less attention to them? But then state that the people who do will have less bargaining power? And think that's somehow seen as a bad thing to them? These seem contradictory and dangerously ignorant. Playing "hard to get" doesn't work unless you are the only candidate in a super specialized field and have multiple offers. What you described is more likely to be taken as either "I'm too disorganized to keep track" or "I don't care enough to keep track". Neither of them is something you want from a candidate. In my experience, someone who misses an interview and doesn't call that day to fix the issue and arrange for an alternate time is likely off the list. After 2-3 days you're likely dead to them.
Whatever you do, do it today or don't bother.
"In my experience, someone who misses an interview and doesn't call that day to fix the issue and arrange for an alternate time is likely off the list. After 2-3 days you're likely dead to them."

He didn't miss the interview because he hasn't accepted it yet....if he accepted the interview, but missed it and didn't call after 2-3 days, THAT I have a problem with. I also do not have a "twisted sense of how this works" because if I missed an email from the employer and replied back 2-3 days later, it doesn't mean I'm "playing hard to get", it's that I've just simply missed it. I also don't think I need to be checking my email constantly awaiting for a reply to job application if I currently have a job.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 29, 2012
972 posts
140 upvotes
Vancouver
TotallyKiller wrote:
Nov 8th, 2017 2:54 pm
While that may sound reasonable, you also have to remember that you missed the interview and have now waited 3 days without contacting them.

I can see this being interpreted in a few ways:

- You are too disorganized, which is why you missed the email. (it should be considered normal job hunting skills to have tags or folders/rules in your email so you know who you've applied to, who has responded, etc. "too many emails" is a horrible excuse.)
- You don't care enough about the job to keep tabs on it throughout your day. Or even over the course of 2 days. If you are applying to jobs you should be checking your email every hour or so. Or at least at the start of your day and a couple of times after that.
- You don't really need the job. (the more you state the "I'm at my full-time job" phrase the more it sounds like you are putting the new potential employer on the back burner.)

No matter how good or bad the hiring manager is, it's still their game that you have to play.
I actually read it, the day the email was sent. Not sure what story I was writing in my original post... really busy at work the past 2 weeks, with a lot of paperwork and sleep deprivation, so I am definitely not thinking straight. But I did read it after work, but by that time I think I couldn't think of a response or didn't have time. It is my because of my irresponsibility or carelessness that I didn't reply right away though. And that definitely does give a very bad impression, and I understand that. I hope we can leave this debate at that. I'm not sure why this is lecturing is necessary, other than to purposely berate me, for something that I fully understand.
Penalty Box
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Mar 23, 2016
753 posts
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SquirreI wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 8:05 am
I've been working 12 hour days and not getting enough sleep because of my 3 hr (in total) commutes to work, so I might not be thinking clearly.

I applied to a job that I want. HR contacted me through email, so I contacted him back stating my availability. The next day he emailed me back "I'm doing tours and interviews today, can you come in?" At that time I was at work so I missed the email, I missed it the second day as well because I get a lot of emails from different websites. It's been 3 days since.

I want to email him back something like, "Sorry, I'm still working full-time at my current job so I missed the interview, if possible could I come in sometime next week?"

Is that alright? Not too demanding? I also want to give at least 3 days-a week's notice at my current job since i'm sort of a core guy in the workplace. But that's not too much of an issue because I want the job.

I think I would get the job because I have 5 years experience in the field already, it's just I feel I don't want to ruin it because of miscommunication. I've had that happen before through email twice, I think some older people just take what happens through text a little too "rough."
HI

So I presume you said you were initially available the day he wanted to meet?

The HR guy sounds a bit preposterous for expecting someone to come in the same day to be honest - what type of company does that?

Regardless: (and what work do you do that works you so hard and what job requires 3 hour travel in Vancouver)

"Hi John,

Apologies for having missed your email the other day. (DID YOU SAY YOU WERE AVAILABLE THAT DAY?) There were some urgent matters at my work the last few days which entailed some late hours so I inadvertently missed your email. I would love to meet with you to discuss this opportunity - do you have availability next week?

Bob"
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