Automotive

Hyundai Engine Malfunction Light

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  • Jun 13th, 2015 10:09 pm
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Jul 22, 2006
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Asker123 wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2015 12:07 pm
Not trying to highjack the thread but how was the life before this good computer and a heck lots of sensors and miles of wires are pushed into the modern cars ? Were people dealing with more car breakdowns or less?
How far back? The late 1990s and early 2000 cars I've owned are easier and cheaper to fix compared to my friends and family who bought modern cars... All those computers mean even simple jobs end up costing a fortune or a trip to the dealership.

Fuel mileage wise, the 2002 Nissan Maxima 6 speed came with a 3.5L engine but I can get 640 km (highway) or 550 - 600 km mixed and still have 1 bar left. Aggressive driving though fuel economy goes down to 300 - 400 a tank
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jacksmith5000 wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2015 11:20 am
so does the barometer checks for air leaks?
I really think you need to learn a bit about sensors on vehicles and what they do. After that, you need to learn what inputs they have to the ECU in the ca and after that, what can occur in the ECU is the sensor feels an anomaly.
I believe you are being facetious but if not, the ECU (and other computers in the car) have a great many inputs and with those inputs control the behaviour of the engine/transmission and even certain parts of the body.
Lastly, there is no barometer on the engine but there is a barometric sensor, just like indicated in the link I posted,
Best line I have heard in a very long time LOL "I don't argue....I educate." Anonymous
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Asker123 wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2015 12:07 pm
Not trying to highjack the thread but how was the life before this good computer and a heck lots of sensors and miles of wires are pushed into the modern cars ? Were people dealing with more car breakdowns or less?
Cars were simple to diagnose and repair back then but that does not mean that they are that much more difficult now.
The same principal of suck, squeeze, bang and blow still applies. It is just that to be as efficient as possible and as pollution aware, the only way to make those constant minuscule adjustments is to monitor (sensors) and adjust (computer) operating parameters.
The thing is, particular with the wealth of information on the internet, that people just read the code and think they replace a sensor and the problem is fixed. fact is, a sensor is dumb...as is a computer. The sensor triggers a light or an ECU action if it feels something outside of the built in parameters and tells the computer to do something. If the computer is able to make the adjustment within it's parameters,it does so. If it cannot, a light comes on to tell the operator something is wrong.
It is a great thing except.....when the person, tech, mechanic or wannabe does not know how to determine what actually caused that sensor to trigger, not just that the sensor made a light come on. Why did it come on? That is called diagnosis and that is what is lacking.
So, was it easier? For an old guy like me yes, because I learned the idiosyncrasies of the engines and transmissions but, I did not have near the tools and test equipment that there is available now and, with those things, getting right is not that difficult. Laziness and making money is more important than getting it right nowadays (not always but often).
Best line I have heard in a very long time LOL "I don't argue....I educate." Anonymous
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Jun 1, 2015
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Pete_Coach wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2015 2:15 pm
I really think you need to learn a bit about sensors on vehicles and what they do. After that, you need to learn what inputs they have to the ECU in the ca and after that, what can occur in the ECU is the sensor feels an anomaly.
I believe you are being facetious but if not, the ECU (and other computers in the car) have a great many inputs and with those inputs control the behaviour of the engine/transmission and even certain parts of the body.
Lastly, there is no barometer on the engine but there is a barometric sensor, just like indicated in the link I posted, which you probably did not read or comprehend.
i'm replying to posts you made earlier. i'll ask again, does the barometric sensor check for air leaks, if so, when does it do it? I had the same problem on my car, the probable causes you posted can cause a map sensor to read wrong, but I cant see how it can cause the barometric sensor to read wrong. I think your wrong on the probable cause relating to a barometric sensor.
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jacksmith5000 wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2015 5:53 pm
i'm replying to posts you made earlier. i'll ask again, does the barometric sensor check for air leaks, if so, when does it do it? I had the same problem on my car, the probable causes you posted can cause a map sensor to read wrong, but I cant see how it can cause the barometric sensor to read wrong. I think your wrong on the probable cause relating to a barometric sensor.
The "probable causes" are not mine, I did not make them up. Take your differences up with the website I linked (and others that will list the same possibler causes).
As I mentioned before and will say again...., the sensors all take readings for whatever they are set up to read. if there is an anomaly, be it barometric pressure or MAP or heat or speed, it send those to a computer. That computer takes all those readings and determines what fuel air/ratio to send into the engine. If one of the parameters it senses are out of range, then the computer reconfigures or triggers a light. The barometric sensor reads a condition and it then feeds it to the computer, there is a difference between the outside barometric pressures and inside the engine pressures. That difference has a parameter
I don't know what you want. I am sorry you don't get it. Your car had a problem. Are you trying to say it was a different sensor? So be it, that is why there is a range of sensors that can trigger the light and that can cause that code to come up. The key though, is to determine why those sensors are reading something outside of the per-programed parameters.
Best line I have heard in a very long time LOL "I don't argue....I educate." Anonymous
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jacksmith5000 wrote:
Jun 3rd, 2015 11:10 am
..
I need to intervene.
jacksmith5000 , you are not understanding the whole point it seems . Let me try , it is not that difficult.
The main point Pete_Coach is trying to explain is ( And I have read it at many other places too) that quite often sensors do their job fine, the underlying cause as to why sensor is sensing what it is sensing should be diagnosed rather than just thinking that sensor is bad and replacing it.

The MAP or Barometric sensor has just become part of this discussion because the site he linked is talking about those.

I request you to stop name calling. We all know Pete_Coach. He has helped on quite many threads.
Hope you understand and no hard feeling. Have a good day.
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Jun 12, 2007
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Op, if your friend doesn't have a scan tool with real-time capability, ask him to measure the MAP sensor output with key on and engine off. This should be the same as baro/atmos.

Start the engine, the MAP sensor pressure should drop to to engine vacuum.

If there is no change in MAP sensor output, the new MAP sensor is dead


If his scan tool does have real-time, you can read the MAP output directly. See if you can find a friend with a better scantool. The odb output is in kPa absolute. It should be around 101.3 kpa (reg atmosphere baro) without the engine running (i.e. KOEO) and drop below that once the engine is running
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Dec 27, 2007
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The poster above is wrong. Why?
If the map sensor wiring is cut. The map sensot data from the live scan tool will give the same reading. Previous poster said map would be bad but it would be the wires.

Only real way to check map sensor is to use a vacuum And a multimeter
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
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Jun 1, 2015
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tmkf_patryk wrote:
Jun 3rd, 2015 12:16 pm
The poster above is wrong. Why?
If the map sensor wiring is cut. The map sensot data from the live scan tool will give the same reading. Previous poster said map would be bad but it would be the wires.

Only real way to check map sensor is to use a vacuum And a multimeter
i,m not questioning the map, I'm questioning the baro and its probable causes. plus its not a circuit code, its a performance code. cut wires will set a different code.
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Feb 6, 2011
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Barometric pressure sensors act like a barometer, measures atmospheric pressure. Standalone sensors will measure atmospheric pressure all the time and are not directly connected to the engine. Combination Map/Baro sensors will measure barometric pressure at KOEO, key on engine off, this is when atmospheric pressure is the same as manifold pressure, they can also measure at WOT (non boosted engines) , wide open throttle, when atmospheric pressure is the same as manifold pressure, air filter restriction will slightly decrease pressure at WOT

In the link provided earlier in this thread, the probable causes, intake leak, low idle, egr valve do not apply to Baro sensors weather they are stand alone or combination units but they will apply to Map sensors.
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Feb 9, 2006
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Wow tmkf_patryk is back I had to check the date to see if it was necro thread.

You can't throw parts at it. Get the sensor and circuit checked out by a mechanic and check for air leaks in the intake system.

A bit of money in the diagnosis will save you in labour and parts in the run
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I don't know who you are or what you are but as I mention many times, if you look up cod P0106 you will find the same diagnostic and information on all the sites. I do not understand why you have trouble coming to grips with this. You are the only one that does not understand....does that tell you something or do you need to find a internet website for that.
I am much more than an internet mechanic and have many years in the auto and aviation business but, it seems if you are having difficulty grasping the simple principals of sensors and diagnosis of them, you must be the "internet mechanic" and, not a very good one at that.
I thank whose that came to my aid, I thought I provided a clear and concise response, backed up by a credible source.
Best line I have heard in a very long time LOL "I don't argue....I educate." Anonymous
[OP]
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Dec 15, 2008
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Thanks RFD mechanics with all the awesome suggestions! As an RFD'er I'm trying my best to stay away from stealership but it seems the further diagnosis needed is complicated and best left with Hyundai Services. I may have to take it in the stealership this one time and get gouged.
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Jul 22, 2014
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Intake manifold gasket is a common problem on those engines and will set that code. Not sure why everyone is attacking pete_coach when he's right.
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Jun 1, 2015
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billford wrote:
Jun 3rd, 2015 3:42 pm
Barometric pressure sensors act like a barometer, measures atmospheric pressure. Standalone sensors will measure atmospheric pressure all the time and are not directly connected to the engine. Combination Map/Baro sensors will measure barometric pressure at KOEO, key on engine off, this is when atmospheric pressure is the same as manifold pressure, they can also measure at WOT (non boosted engines) , wide open throttle, when atmospheric pressure is the same as manifold pressure, air filter restriction will slightly decrease pressure at WOT

In the link provided earlier in this thread, the probable causes, intake leak, low idle, egr valve do not apply to Baro sensors weather they are stand alone or combination units but they will apply to Map sensors.
finally, a no nonsense answer, straight to the point. THANK YOU

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