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[Hyundai] [ONT] Hyundai Ioniq SE Electric - $28,352 all-in after ONT rebate

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  • Sep 22nd, 2017 7:01 pm
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radeonboy wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 2:27 pm
I don't think that's fully correct. The Bolt comes with a 7.2kw charger while the Ioniq has like a 6.6kw like you stated.
Most public and home L2 chargers are rated 6.6 kwh. Even if the Bolt can charge at 7.7kwh it'll only do 6.6kwh based on the charger itself. So both cars will charge at the same rate and the Ioniq will finish faster due to it's smaller battery.

Newer L2 chargers coming out now have been updated to charge at 7.7kwh.
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some1not wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:13 am
Most public and home L2 chargers are rated 6.6 kwh. Even if the Bolt can charge at 7.7kwh it'll only do 6.6kwh based on the charger itself. So both cars will charge at the same rate and the Ioniq will finish faster due to it's smaller battery.

Newer L2 chargers coming out now have been updated to charge at 7.7kwh.
I live in a condo, so it's impossible to buy a full electric car right? Don't think we have any charging station here.
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radeonboy wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 9:43 am
I just want to know where you tested the Ioniq, which dealership? I'm guessing Collingwood? Thanks
FYI. Last week I test drove the Ioniq Electric SE with cold climate package at Mississauga Hyundai at the Erin Mills auto park.
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for the price, wouldn't you buy a model 3 ??
"When operating the viewfinder diopter control with your eye to the viewfinder, care should be taken not to put your finger in your eye accidentally."
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akito925 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:44 am
for the price, wouldn't you buy a model 3 ??
I would question the wait time on that though. Considering there you are way behind in line, it may be a very long wait.
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akito925 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:44 am
for the price, wouldn't you buy a model 3 ??
Tesla website says ETA if you reserve is between 12-18 months...thats not a guarantee as well. By that time the ON gov incentive program may already be dead
Last edited by radeonboy on Sep 13th, 2017 11:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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akito925 wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:44 am
for the price, wouldn't you buy a model 3 ??
You'd have to wait 1 extra year to get one and pay at least 5k more for the base model 3 (probably even more as there is no pricing information for Canada yet, but 35k USD is roughly 42.5k CAD + add at least 1.5% for transportation etc = 43k + 13% HST = 48.5k - 14k rebate if it's still there by the time you get your model 3 = 34.5k, and that's a bare minimum) But honestly, yes the difference is not that much and I still keep my reservation that I put on April 1st 2016 and will be making decision when my time comes. Meanwhile, I'm happily driving 2017 FFE that I got for 20.5k OTR.
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seafish wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 11:09 am
You'd have to wait 1 extra year to get one and pay at least 5k more for the base model 3 (probably even more as there is no pricing information for Canada yet, but 35k USD is roughly 42.5k CAD + add at least 1.5% for transportation etc = 43k + 13% HST = 48.5k - 14k rebate if it's still there by the time you get your model 3 = 34.5k, and that's a bare minimum) But honestly, yes the difference is not that much and I still keep my reservation that I put on April 1st 2016 and will be making decision when my time comes. Meanwhile, I'm happily driving 2017 FFE that I got for 20.5k OTR.
I like the FFE but that trunk is too small for my needs. Its a good BEV definitely at THAT price you got
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762mm wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 2:27 am
My question is whether or not this will be worth it for people who keep their cars 8-10+ years... and my guess is NEGATIVE. We have had a few hybrid cars/trucks at work over the years (management thought it would be good for PR) and they all had to be sent to the scrap yard quite early because the electric systems eventually crapped out and it wasn't worth keeping the vehicles. It's typically the batteries that will go on them after 5 years or so, but there were other electric issues too that were quite expensive to fix, since all the systems on these things are electric (power steering, brakes, transmission shifter, etc... even the gas cap door!). A power steering module that needed to be swapped out twice on some of our hybrids was $1200 a shot for the part, just to give you an idea. Resale value on them is total crap too and no car dealer wants these in their lots as trade-ins, since used electric and hybrid cars simply never sell and linger around the lot forever (and so dealers tend to avoid them like the plague).

All in all, our hybrids at work were great on gas, but ended up costing more in maintenance and relatively short lifespans than their full-gas cousins of the same generation (that we still have around and running, by the way). All that electric car hype is drummed up by big businesses and phonies like Al Gore who make billions on supposedly "saving the planet", but the reality of the actual math is not as awesome as it looks on paper. Essentially, you have to be well off to drive an electric car, much more so than if you plan on driving the equivalent gas-only model... unless you only lease these things and get rid of them before the bills start piling up (and it's been proven that leasing new cars continuously is not for folks on a budget).

Here's a thought: instead of looking solely at "cost of gas mileage vs. electric mileage", it would be much more REALISTIC to compare TOTAL long-term ownership costs between gas and electric cars of the same make and model for a change, like after 10 years of ownership (which any modern vehicle should easily last). From the much higher price tag at the dealer to what it costs to fix/maintain these things and to what the resale value will be years down the line... and don't forget: you can't get these fixed/maintained at the corner garage, as they require mechanics to be specialized in electric/hybrid cars or else it's illegal for them to work on these things (for safety reasons). Translation: the maintenance/repairs will have to be done exclusively at the dealership, plus parts prices are ridiculously high for anything hybrid or electric when compared to gas-only vehicles (because this niche market commands a huge premium). Cha-ching!

;)
From everything I've read, it is the exact opposite of what you say. TCO for EVs is less than comparable ICE cars. Maintenance is practically nothing. And my anecdotal evidence as a Volt owner for three years, is that the maintenance is a lot less for EVs, much less than I thought going in. You drive just a bit efficiently, aggressively use regen braking, and brake pad wear is next to nil. The battery warranty is eight years or 160,000km (from memory, something like that) . For well designed battery systems like in the Volt/Bolt, battery degradation has been insignificant. http://insideevs.com/chevy-volt-400000- ... gradation/
Last edited by drgrittani on Sep 13th, 2017 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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I did not say anything against PHEVs, BEVs or hybrids, lol. I was asking the other fellow whether his fleet had Toyota hybrids because they are known to be very reliable, the same reason I got my wife a RAV4H, well she's paying for it too.

@drgrittani
From everything I've read, it is the exact opposite of what you say. TCO for EVs is less that comparable ICE cars. Maintenance is practically nothing. And my anecdotal evidence as a Volt owner for three years, is that the maintenance is a lot less for EVs, much less than I thought going in. You drive just a bit efficiently, aggressively use regen braking, and brake pad wear is next to nil. The battery warranty is eight years or 160,000km (from memory, something like that) . For well designed battery systems like in the Volt/Bolt, battery degradation has been insignificant. http://insideevs.com/chevy-volt-400000- ... gradation/


Edit: Okay, figured you misquoted me. For Tesla's, what you stated may not be true though hopefully the drive unit will be bullet proof in the M3.
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yes, i replied to the wrong post, apologies, I hope I fixed it now, meant to reply to 762mm.
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Avignon wrote:
Sep 9th, 2017 7:05 pm
127 km on Eco mode; 117 without; yes for us it's exactly that - an urban runabout, at which it excels.

The reviewers have all been citing 160 km, but that's the European metric, which is always higher than the North American metric.
Uh, wut? A km is a km no matter what part of the world you measure it in. Or am I missing something? Maybe the European estimates are higher, if they aren't taking winter climates into consideration?
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The methodologies they use to obtain the estimate vary.
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JasonCao wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 10:28 am
I live in a condo, so it's impossible to buy a full electric car right? Don't think we have any charging station here.
It's not impossible, you'll just need to do a little extra to keep your car charged.

I have a friend who lives in North York near Ikea and lives in a condo who bought a Leaf after taking a ride in mine. He couldn't install a charger in his spot in the garage, but being that he lives close to a charging station (Ikea) he would charge there before he came home at night. So you really don't need a charger at home, but it's convenient if you do.

For about a month last summer, I didn't use my home charger and only went with the charging stations that was on route to and from work, to see if I can live without a charger at home. I was able to get by fine. Now I'm not too worried when I forget to plug my car in at night, cause I know I can get a quick charge on my way to work. Once you know what your EV can do and where the public charging stations you can use are, range anxiety is a non issue.
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some1not wrote:
Sep 13th, 2017 12:17 pm
It's not impossible, you'll just need to do a little extra to keep your car charged.

I have a friend who lives in North York near Ikea and lives in a condo who bought a Leaf after taking a ride in mine. He couldn't install a charger in his spot in the garage, but being that he lives close to a charging station (Ikea) he would charge there before he came home at night. So you really don't need a charger at home, but it's convenient if you do.

For about a month last summer, I didn't use my home charger and only went with the charging stations that was on route to and from work, to see if I can live without a charger at home. I was able to get by fine. Now I'm not too worried when I forget to plug my car in at night, cause I know I can get a quick charge on my way to work. Once you know what your EV can do and where the public charging stations you can use are, range anxiety is a non issue.
Good to heard that it's not as bad. Unfortunately I have a family so waiting an extra hour to just charge is not an option. I guess I will get the hybrid instead and maybe EV later down in life when I get my own house.

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