Food & Drink

I have a cultural curiosity about food portions

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  • Feb 20th, 2019 6:38 pm
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I have a cultural curiosity about food portions

I'm Asian and growing up it was typical to have a large portion of rice proportionate to the side dishes or as we called it, the salty dishes. The concept of courses when you done in a western restaurant is fairly foreign to me even to this day but is the basic tenet behind that is to try and avoid flavour fatigue and generally promote a diverse serving of foods? I see that even take outs like sushi dishes they use very little rice but usually I see this as an adaquite portion for most western adults. I believe this is more about portion control more than anything else.

I guess this is why people who can be disciplined in how much they consume per meal tend to have their weight in check compared to the ones that order 2 combos at McDonald's and a large diet soda, lol.
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Rice is cheap. "Flavor" isn't.
Most of China was/is poor.
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Have to agree, Asian portions are based on saving money, more rice, less meat, more cheap vegetables/eggs. This is more evident in korean food. Rice and egg or rice and side dishes is a cheap way to eat.

It’s impact on the body’s physique seems to consist of a thinner almost malnourished figure from what I see. Most Asians are underdeveloped, shorter, bones are thinner, body structure is thin
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toronto19850 wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 6:10 am
Have to agree, Asian portions are based on saving money, more rice, less meat, more cheap vegetables/eggs. This is more evident in korean food. Rice and egg or rice and side dishes is a cheap way to eat.

It’s impact on the body’s physique seems to consist of a thinner almost malnourished figure from what I see. Most Asians are underdeveloped, shorter, bones are thinner, body structure is thin
Being Korean (and partially Japanese), I would disagree that there is "more rice"... especially compared to other Asian cultures. It's typically just a small bowl of rice. Also egg is not as prevalent in Korean cooking, but it's never mixed with just rice. Eggs are often used are side dish like tamago (Korean style is messier and has green onions in it), streamed eggs, or fish cakes. Or as an accent on a dish like a thin layer of a scrambled egg that covers Korean fried rice, fried egg on bibimbap, or a hard boiled egg in the cold noodles. Just mixing an egg with rice is actually a Japanese thing.

Traditional Korean meals show the little cost from the stews that typically use leftover ingredients like bones, cheap meat cuts, old kimchi, cheap fish, etc. Vegetables are often pickled, so they last longer. There's very little waste. But keep in mind Koreans do eat plenty of beef, chicken, ox, pork, etc. Sure traditionally, these items were more scarce, but nowadays, it's very common. Though not like AYCE Korean BBQ places.

Also the skinny, malnourished look of many Koreans today are not a byproduct of Korean cuisine, but rather what the in thing is there. For both men and women, they want to be super skinny and ghost-like pale.

@Supercooled -Just out of curiosity, are you Filipino?
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Lithe frames and shorter stature was aiso common in Europe in the earlier part of the past century. The impetus for food stamps in the U.S. came about as a result of the depression. The U.S. military was finding that potential recruits who grew up in that era were smaller and weaker. Needed bigger, stronger, cannon fodder.
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toronto19850 wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 6:10 am
Have to agree, Asian portions are based on saving money, more rice, less meat, more cheap vegetables/eggs. This is more evident in korean food. Rice and egg or rice and side dishes is a cheap way to eat.

It’s impact on the body’s physique seems to consist of a thinner almost malnourished figure from what I see. Most Asians are underdeveloped, shorter, bones are thinner, body structure is thin
Is meat really cheaper than veggie, especially in Canada? consider importation costs and FX fluctuation, shorter shelf/freezer life along the supply chain and disruptions in the supply chain i.e. climate variables.

Given inflation effects, I noticed the veggies are the first to go, speaking on behalf of Korean BBQ place in GTA. And it would make sense for higher substitution of cheap staple foods such as rice.
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joeyjoejoe wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 11:30 am
Being Korean (and partially Japanese), I would disagree that there is "more rice"... especially compared to other Asian cultures. It's typically just a small bowl of rice. Also egg is not as prevalent in Korean cooking, but it's never mixed with just rice. Eggs are often used are side dish like tamago (Korean style is messier and has green onions in it), streamed eggs, or fish cakes. Or as an accent on a dish like a thin layer of a scrambled egg that covers Korean fried rice, fried egg on bibimbap, or a hard boiled egg in the cold noodles. Just mixing an egg with rice is actually a Japanese thing.

Traditional Korean meals show the little cost from the stews that typically use leftover ingredients like bones, cheap meat cuts, old kimchi, cheap fish, etc. Vegetables are often pickled, so they last longer. There's very little waste. But keep in mind Koreans do eat plenty of beef, chicken, ox, pork, etc. Sure traditionally, these items were more scarce, but nowadays, it's very common. Though not like AYCE Korean BBQ places.

Also the skinny, malnourished look of many Koreans today are not a byproduct of Korean cuisine, but rather what the in thing is there. For both men and women, they want to be super skinny and ghost-like pale.

@Supercooled -Just out of curiosity, are you Filipino?
It’s not that Koreans eat more rice, but a larger portion of their meal is rice.


From my experience with korean food and my korean friends have told me korean whenever we went to eat, korean food is very slim on meat. Portion wise a handful per meal at most and a small one most of the time.

Interesting, all the Korean friends I know try to get a more muscular toned physique, rather than a skinny one. Which is why they mentioned how the small amount of meat in their dishes was making it difficult for them to gain weight.
They were always eating soups with white rice, or small portions of meat with white rice or noodles in soup with no meat as their typical home cooked meal.
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LongLiveRFD wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 12:07 pm
Is meat really cheaper than veggie, especially in Canada? consider importation costs and FX fluctuation, shorter shelf/freezer life along the supply chain and disruptions in the supply chain i.e. climate variables.

Given inflation effects, I noticed the veggies are the first to go, speaking on behalf of Korean BBQ place in GTA. And it would make sense for higher substitution of cheap staple foods such as rice.
Vegetables are by far cheaper than meat, I don’t even know how that’s a question?
Unless you’re buying all the fancy vegetables from whole foods and the meat is coming from nofrill’s frozen aisle.
[OP]
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joeyjoejoe wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 11:30 am

@Supercooled -Just out of curiosity, are you Filipino?
Chinese, but neither Canton nor Mandarin but with a very eclectic sounding dialect. Every time I hear someone speak it outside of my family I always get a chuckle.
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LongLiveRFD wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 12:07 pm
Is meat really cheaper than veggie
If you're comparing cheapest things in either categories, then no.
But there's quite a few meat cuts that are cheaper than even "regular" vegetables.

If all you're eating is potatoes, no.
But once you start tossing salad into the mix (especially in winter) some meats are cheaper per pound.

toronto19850 wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 12:50 pm
Vegetables are by far cheaper than meat, I don’t even know how that’s a question?
Unless you’re buying all the fancy vegetables from whole foods and the meat is coming from nofrill’s frozen aisle.
Continuing from above, cheapest of both categories means that veggies win.
But back on chicken legs are like $1/lb. Bone in butts are $2/lb.
There's quite a few normal things in normal grocery stores that are much more than this.
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Supercooled wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 3:51 pm
Chinese, but neither Canton nor Mandarin but with a very eclectic sounding dialect. Every time I hear someone speak it outside of my family I always get a chuckle.
Fujian/fukien/hokkien?
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Youre over analZying it bud.
Its kind of universal to carb up to save cost.

CertAin european regions like soup and bread/potatoes.!Vitamins and taste from soup... filler from bread/potatoes.

South asia like rice and naan bread. Meats are very on sauce and flavouring to help carry the carbs.

Shoot even Canadian’s have poutines thats mostly fries and gravy with cheese curds to help. Lol
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Supercooled wrote:
Feb 14th, 2019 12:22 am
...is the basic tenet behind that is to try and avoid flavour fatigue and generally promote a diverse serving of foods?
Similar to what's already said, it's a financial reason for the consumer.
Also, I think from the restaurant's perspective, how much can they charge for sushi (fish + very little rice) vs poki (fish + rice bowl)?
The mark-up/ optic is very different (i.e. Restaurant is charging a premium so they better add more value because I can cook a bowl of rice in the microwave)
If they sell big rice bowl at low prices, their gross margin won't be enough to cover the overhead.
If they sell at high prices, they need to be able to justify it (think Disney)
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Supercooled wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 1:55 am
Chew jow
a.k.a. Teochew, Chiu Chow. Apparently it's relatively similar to Hokkien.

That's rare here. No restaurants offering that cuisine in and around Vancouver AFAIK.
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