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I used to work for CIBC...Ask me anything

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Deal Addict
May 24, 2010
1035 posts
152 upvotes
I also believe CIBC is the crappiest bank in terms of treating their employees. When I did coop they asked me how much I wanted, I said 42k (my reasoning being that the avg for our coop placements was 42k), and they low balled me with 33k. It was hard to believe that one of the biggest Canadian companies was that far south of average :confused:

The HR girl was super hot I'll give them that, but that was not incentive enough to take the job.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 8, 2011
113 posts
8 upvotes
TORONTO
boredsilly wrote:
Aug 13th, 2011 8:09 pm
I also believe CIBC is the crappiest bank in terms of treating their employees. When I did coop they asked me how much I wanted, I said 42k (my reasoning being that the avg for our coop placements was 42k), and they low balled me with 33k. It was hard to believe that one of the biggest Canadian companies was that far south of average :confused:

The HR girl was super hot I'll give them that, but that was not incentive enough to take the job.

Dude, lol. You asked for 42k for a co-op placement? The salary for a SENIOR FSR full-time in downtown toronto maxes out at 38k. lol

They do pay the lowest out of all the banks, have the worst service, and most backwards computer system. Seriously, it's freaking MS-DOS and it breaks down constantly. Once the computers were down for 3 hours during the day. I had to explain this to people and they wanted to like spit on me, they couldn't believe it.
Newbie
Aug 13, 2011
1 posts
Toronto
Hey all,
Just been reading this thread with much amusement and wanted to put in my 2 cents. I too once worked as a teller at CIBC but want to let y'all know that the job isnt all doom and gloom. If you're looking to break in the banking industry even this job is a good start. I work at RBC now but i don't regret the time I put in to be a teller. I only had to do the job for 6 months before I moved onto an FSA role where becoming an FA (financial advisor) was just a step away. While the sales requirements are there as a teller, it isnt as bad or as hard as its been made out to be. I had a great time with my branch colleagues and they were all very supportive and helpful. It's imporant that you get along with your colleagues and of course try to be friendly to the clients because showing the right attitude really does go a long way.
As a teller I never made a huge number of referrals but i was still given FSR or FSA opportunities at any of my choice locations. One important point I want to get across for aspiring tellers regardless of which bank is that you have to show your ambition or desire to want to move up. They understand that you have ahard-earned university degree or whatever and that you're very unlikely to want to make a career of being a teller but just consider the job as 'paying your dues'.
I'm in a good spot now but it likely would'nt have happened if CIBC hadn't given me that first shot.
Member
Apr 8, 2007
466 posts
34 upvotes
Just moved everything to other bank... Cibc has worst service, bad products, and higher mer...

They charged me a closing fee for move money over to ing.... Wtf

Never going back to cibc again

Bit off the topic, I used to work for Canadian western... Ask away anything
Living in this big world, I have a little dream.
Newbie
Feb 27, 2009
15 posts
Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 10:37 pm
I quit because 2 people quit at the same time and we were left with 3 tellers that had to deal thousands of clients in a day. Then of the 3, 1 ended up flying away randomly to Cuba and I was doing the job of like 3 people, doing overtime and not getting paid for it (hence so many class actions), and having an ABM that had less education than myself. Instead of getting in a temp teller we were left with 2 tellers for 3 months so that means no lunch breaks (not allowed). I left everyday with a splitting headache. How is it possible to sell if you have like 250+ transactions in a day and lineups with 30 people. Nightmare.

I believe they all pay roughly the same for the CSR role however RBC treats its tellers the best. They certainly have the easiest job since they aren't expected to sell at all. Make the client happy for what they originally came to the bank for. The way it should be.

I tihnk i will swich my bankin with RBC or Td or somewhere... i hate those type of manager... who only wares corp hat to make it look good from out side ... without putting there feet in employee's shoe... i totally doing that next week
Newbie
Nov 18, 2009
4 posts
VANCOUVER
For the most part, being a bank teller is a dead-end job. For those that managed to move up quickly or eventually, it's because they are buddies with one of the management teams or in a fortuitous event, one of the managers happen to like your work. Most of them that moved up are not very intelligent and organized. This is most often the case no matter where you work.

All bank tellers are required to make sales pitch, no matter where they work. Otherwise, the bank might as well replace them with machines.
Deal Addict
Dec 24, 2005
4787 posts
509 upvotes
Planeticket wrote:
Aug 14th, 2011 11:59 am
I'm in a good spot now but it likely would'nt have happened if CIBC hadn't given me that first shot.
Agree too

I was a CSR for CIBC for about a year (10 years ago now!) I only stayed with CIBC for another year after that (Into a Branch Manager for PC Banking at the time) --- but it's that first job which opened many doors for me
Newbie
May 20, 2007
84 posts
1 upvote
Etobicoke
I have a few friends working in banking and I'm curious what the differences are between working for the big banks.

Much of this, I know can depend on role and department and what your manager is like. Is it the career prospect, better work environment, salary? Or is it the overall corporate direction?

I know some are happy where they work, others not so much. But they have different roles. I can't really tell from the outside what the difference between working for BMO, CIBC, etc. is.

When you look at their HR site, all they tell to prospective employees is like any other company (aside from banks): We treasure, develop and encourage our employees to grow. We pay competitively. And working for us is great.

Now, how are you supposed to know the diff?

Any thoughts on certifications? I'm fairly new to working in banking. Someone encouraged me to do the CA. It looks good to have those credentials I suppose but I want either sales or corporate communications. I looked at one of the CA texts and was instantly bored to death!!! I've done the CSC and that's much more tolerable.

Side note: I know someone who is a bank executive and they explained they started as a teller. It is possible to make it to senior management. You have to have the education and experience to back it up.
Deal Addict
May 24, 2010
1035 posts
152 upvotes
KonaHeiHei wrote:
Aug 22nd, 2011 6:45 pm

Side note: I know someone who is a bank executive and they explained they started as a teller. It is possible to make it to senior management. You have to have the education and experience to back it up.


Also be born in 1950 when that was possible. Nowadays teller is a negative if anything.
Deal Addict
Aug 13, 2007
1100 posts
25 upvotes
Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 10:09 pm
You are spot on. The bank teller role is a very stressful retail job where you earn 3 bucks more per hour. You have so much work to do and if you're ever "out" (not balance) you're screwed. Luckily I'm great with math and don't need a calculator even for really complicated deposits and such.

At my branch we were not allowed to sit at all and we were grossly under staffed. I would stand for 7 hours, come home with an aching back and then get screamed at the next day by my ABM about why I only had 1 sale instead of 2. Some banks are better about this. TD is also very sales oriented. RBC does not require tellers to make sales. They simply process transactions, which takes the stress out of the job, it's fantastic.

I am with BMO & my dad is with Scotia ..I do my dad's banking most of the times at Scotia with his PIN/Debit card as he is out of town on vactions etc .

I find that the when I go to BMO or Scotia ..the tellers never try to sell me anything ..no upsell nothing ..maybe I am just lucky @ both banks ..so I am assuming that BMO & Scotia are probably like RBC where they don't force tellers to sell . They only do what I ask them to to do ( basically deposits/withdrawals etc ) ..& then just ask me " Anything else " ?? ..which is cool :)
Newbie
Oct 21, 2005
30 posts
8 upvotes
I have to throw my 2 cents in on this about selling things at the bank since I work at CIBC as a CSR and I've met many people who have worked as CSRs at other banks. Everyone I've talked to from TD, RBC, BMO, HSBC and Coast Capital all must try to make "sale." People who don't get upsold something at bank probably already have a chequing account, savings account, and a credit card with that particular bank so theres no need to ask them to get any other products till of course you need a mortgage and thats the biggest thing we can try for clients to get. But I am very sure that every bank requires there CSR to look for an opportunity. At my branch we see the same clients day in and day out so referals for other products are pretty low and our manager doesnt emphasize sales so much as we are trying to focus on customer service. I haven't heard of anyone getting fired for no referals either, you might get a talk to to see if you are even trying to look for opportunities, but never heard of anyone gettng fired.
And I do agree that CIBC has the most ghetto system probably, but you get use to it after while. I use to work at McDonalds as a manager and they're a big ass corporation with an almost as ghetto system as CIBC where you enter MS DOS style commands. Even TD has a separate MS DOS system to from what I hear, so I mean its not just CIBC, but still you would think they would upgrade it.
Sr. Member
Nov 22, 2010
641 posts
107 upvotes
Toronto
tjthemanto wrote:
Aug 23rd, 2011 1:29 am
I find that the when I go to BMO or Scotia ..the tellers never try to sell me anything ..no upsell nothing ..maybe I am just lucky @ both banks ..so I am assuming that BMO & Scotia are probably like RBC where they don't force tellers to sell . They only do what I ask them to to do ( basically deposits/withdrawals etc ) ..& then just ask me " Anything else " ?? ..which is cool :)

I'm with BMO also and I have never been sold anything. I only have a chequing account along with investorline, so I could have been sold a savings account, US account, MC, mortgage, LOC, HELOC, but nope. Contrast that with TD where they try to sell me something on every opportunity.
Deal Addict
Mar 24, 2005
1320 posts
95 upvotes
I've read through this entire thread and I just cannot bite my tongue and have to set the op straight because I think the op is extremely ignorant and lacks a lot of maturity and is providing a lot of misleading information. While I sympathize with you, op, I do agree that CIBC is far behind from its competitors but is far from the devil that you make it out to be. Having worked in the finance industry for well over 10 years, and am now a consultant to all the banks, I am aware of CIBC's issues around treatment of staff, the high turnover rates, the legal issues, etc... but to have said the things you have said so far, I must say you gave a lot of incorrect information, a lot of your views are very pre-mature and your statement of 'facts' lack any concrete evidence.

My advice to you? Learn from this whole experience and figure out where YOU went wrong and what YOU could have done to avoid being in this situation again, and also about what YOU could have done better. To completely just 'blame' the employer is just too easy. You have just as much fault in this too.

Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
I can tell you first hand how dysfunctional this institution is. Ask me anything.
First of all, you cannot just make an inference that CIBC as an institution, is dysfunctional. Your personal exposure is limited to your direct exposure working as a CSR at one branch, albeit it is the bank's main branch. You should know that CIBC's retail banking services make up only a fraction of the organization and is certainly not the largest revenue generator for the institution.

Let's not forget about its wholesalebanking, wealth management, business banking, risk management, finance, technology and operations, etc.

Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
I never heard of anyone being internally promoted other than going from CSR to FSR but that was after 2 years of working as a CSR (teller). Higher positions were always hired from outside......Oh, CIBC does indeed have an internal job site but in a branch setting they don't hire from within unless you've been there for years. They have a "global hiring policy" where you need to be a CSR for minimum 1 year before you can even apply for other positions.
All the banks have similar internal policies which require individuals to perform in their role for a period of 2 years before you can move onto another role - it may be less in entry level positions. Higher positions are given to the best candidate with serious consideration for an internal applicant. The best person usually gets the position. If it is a common theme, then there is something to be said about the quality of employees at CIBC.

Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Having a university degree, the CSC and only being allowed to work 15 hours per week as a CSR before being able to apply for other positions just made me go out of my mind.
It was your choice to join CIBC starting at the bottom. You should have done your research and also, you should have gained much more relevant experience and instead, apply for a higher level position not in the branch. Instead, you decided to join the worst performer of the big 4 banks, and chose a dead-end job. Whoever told you it was a good step in the door doesn't know how the real world works. If you work in a branch or in a call centre, it's extremely difficult to progress from there. You only have yourselve to blame.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
CSR's only go to FSR if there weekly referrals were the best in the district. You have to make at least 10 big sales a week to get any notice. Anything less than that and you get reprimanded.
Again, you should've done your research and realize that the position has evolved into more of a sales position rather than a simple routine-based bank teller job. Making 2 sales each day is not an unrealistic target. Difficult perhaps at best.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
The CSR position can certainly lead you to an FSR role which pays (30-40k per year) if you are a top salesperson. Like any job, your success and promotion is determined by how well you do IN THAT ROLE. Getting industry qualifications and degrees are not of interest to a bank. They want you to sell and push the banks products. If you succeed at doing that you can advance to a higher sales position.
You should be careful when you make such strong statements about how industry qualifications and degrees are not of interest to a bank. In fact, it's the exact opposite - what is true however, is that a degree and industry qualifications is of no interest to a CSR position. The fact that you thought it should be is simply ignorance on your part.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Going from teller to capital markets portfolio manager is unheard of unless you're fortunate enough to sleep with someone high up or achieve a full CFA license and MBA. There were 2 other tellers that had been there for 9 years in that exact position, earning 13.70/hour without any hope of moving up.
You make it sound like to get anywhere in the bank, you have to sleep with someone, similar to how you repeatedly made comments about how you slept with someone that pratically got you into a CSR position. Sorry to say, but this is so far from reality. There are many talented individuals who go into an investment banking analyst role with an accounting background and no CFA or MBA. Those who stay in teller positions for 9 years are there for a reason. It's because they simply do not have the aspirations or the skills/abilities to go further.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Networking is the most important thing. It's better than degrees, it's better than licenses. You know the sexist saying "I made my career on my back?" There's nothing wrong with it and in today's economy, it's probably not such a bad idea. You don't need to prostitute yourself but networking is to a certain extent about sucking up, making friends.
Degrees help you get a foot in the door - it's what position (how high or how low) that matters. From there on, it's experience and networking. Degrees are equally as important because it could hold you back from making the cut when applying for higher level positions. Again, your belief that sleeping your way to the top really shows your ignorance and lack of maturity.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
The branch manager told me that the HR rep interviewed 200 candidates over the phone and 18 were interviewed in the branch. I didn't realize that the competition for a "teller" role was so fierce.
What you faild to realize is that you, with your university degree, was fighting for bread crumbs when what you should've been doing is fighting for the mid-entry level positions. Why fight for a position that is already given to university students, after you have finished university? Sure, everyone wants to work at a bank and of course there will be tonnes of applicants. There will be college grads fighting for it, even people with no degrees and just have sales experience. I guess you must've thought you were no better than them either, huh?


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
In regards to sales targets, it's very tough. Our district required each teller to make a minimum of 2 sales per day. If someone comes up to you to inquire about a product, that doesn't count. You need to initiate the conversation AND you need to get them into an office.......So if you are working 5 days a week, you need minimum 10 sales. Anything less than that and your district rank, assistant branch manager rank, and personal rank goes down. Every CIBC in the district can see each persons ranking, it's quite humiliating.
Everyone pays their dues when they're working from the bottom. As I mentioned earlier, 2 sales per day is not unrealistic - sure it may be more difficult when you're short staffed but that's where you failed in your decision making. While you believe it is the right choice to not bother selling and simply 'move' the line faster, the fact is your ABM and BM has mandated that you sell - it is part of your job accountabilities - if customers are complaining about the wait time, then it's the BM's issue to staff the branch appropiately - not yours. People who lack the maturity does not realize that they are the problem for some of the experience that they have faced, and are quick to blame the employer. If you can't handle the heat in the kitchen, then get out - further educate yourself and choose your positions more wisely. Furthermore, I do not see how internally publishing your sales ranking makes CIBC anymore dysfunctional than any other sales position in the market. It promotes competition and transparency. It's only humiliating if you are an under performer. If you're not selling, you share the blame. If your ABM is not giving you the tools and knowledge to do better, it's because you failed to ask for it then. Growing your career, no one is going to give it to you on a silver platter. Learn to fight for yourself and taking the initiative to get to where you want to be.
Deal Addict
Mar 24, 2005
1320 posts
95 upvotes
Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
You have 4 weeks from your date of hire to complete all of the regulatory courses. They are 40 internet based classes that take about 1.5 hours to complete each. After each course there is a test. If you fail the test it gets recorded and your manager sees it. It's quite nerve wracking. The ABM will try and get you to finish the courses well within 3 weeks and then have you watch another teller for about 1-2 weeks and then you're on your own.
Again, you failed to do your research. Anti-money laundering rules, privacy, security, etc.. being at the forefront of handling and interacting with customers, you're going to be required to pass a number of regulatory courses. Also, the last I heard, not all 40 courses are mandatory and while it is suggested it takes 1.5 hours to complete, you can complete them usually in half hour for each course. For these reasons, I cannot see how CIBC is dysfunctional when it comes to their retail branch operations.

Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
The learning curve is insane because COINS (CIBC's system) is like MS DOS and incredibly slow, and difficult to operate.
Actually, CIBC made significant investment spend on rebuilding their retail banking platform in early 2000, introducing an n-tiered services based architecture framework. Previously, they were using mainframe telnet terminals to perform transactions, which would interact directly with a mainframe server. The 'ms-dos' like experience and slowness you are referring to is known as "greenscreens", which involes many steps just to do 1 thing. However, as I recall, perhaps their biggest decision flaw in overhauling their retail banking platform was their choice to keep green-screen experience so that it would have minimal impact on the end users. The intention, given the new architecture and infrastructure in place, is to easily replace the presentation layer with a new GUI when CIBC was prepared to fund it. However, it's been over a decade since. If there are any performance issues then it could be attributed to the outdated technology and the scalability of the infrastructure has reached its maximum due to growth.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
If you consistently do not meet your sales targets you most often get terminated. If you have a nice ABM he will help you with your sales technique but often low sales are beyond a CSR's control. If the branch is busy and only 2 people are working the last thing on your mind is trying to make a sale, it's about moving the line along so a complaint isn't filed. The maximum wait time per customer is 3 minutes, anything more than that and the the branches rating will go down. The branch is audited and "mystery shopped" 4 times per year. If you fail the "shop" you are most often terminated.
Again, it was your decision to not sell. Your job is to sell, not move the line. If a complaint is filed, it's not your problem because the BM failed to resource the branch appropiately. If the BM gives you pressure, you need to learn to grow a backbone and push back and advise the BM that you either sell and keep customers waiting or you move the line, or lower the sales targets - until he/she can properly staff the branch. BTW, Mystery shopped is not uncommon in ALL sales functions - it has nothing to do with CIBC being dysfunctional.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
At my branch we were not allowed to sit at all and we were grossly under staffed. I would stand for 7 hours, come home with an aching back and then get screamed at the next day by my ABM about why I only had 1 sale instead of 2. Some banks are better about this. TD is also very sales oriented. RBC does not require tellers to make sales. They simply process transactions, which takes the stress out of the job, it's fantastic.
Most sales positions do not allow people to sit - they're standing and talking to customers and it promotes professionalism. Many people stand for 7 hours working various jobs and don't complain about it. Grow up. Also, get it in your head that every CSR is required to sell - while different banks will set a mandate, others will just encourage it and it really comes down to each individual branch.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Well, CIBC is ranked last out of the big 5 banks. Why? They're grossly behind in technology and are too cheap to fix it.
Seriously, how much do you know about CIBC to make a blanket statement with no supporting facts? CIBC has been a laggard mainly because of the lack of strategic direction and the high profile in-fighting and continuous restructuring at the executive ranks. Aside from that, a significant reason is because of the under performance from its foreign operations, including its US based operations, as well as their huge credit run-offs. The fact that they had some legal issues also did not bode well for them but those were the least of their worries.

Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Secondly, there is such a high turnover rate of employees. People hate working for CIBC because they pay the lowest out of all the banks and if you don't meet your targets you often don't get any bonus.
Again, your statement should be directed to the CSR position only. While CIBC may pay its CSR's the lowest, we're talking about a matter of cents, or a dollar at most (per hour rate). You even admitted this yourself that the pay for the CSR role is about the same. When you look at the difference, that is insignificant espcially when you factor in taxes. So there's no sense in complaining about it. Also, it was your choice to work there in the first place. If you don't like the pay, then you should've worked elsewhere.

Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
... I was doing the job of like 3 people, doing overtime and not getting paid for it (hence so many class actions), and having an ABM that had less education than myself.
You may be ignorant or you failed to mention that the class action lawsuits were dismissed 2 years a go. There was no evidence to support the claim that all employees at the branch level were affected. Also, the reference to not getting paid overtime, although it may be true in some cases, was not the case for all. Also, it was only ONE class action lawsuit. The other legal issues had nothing to do with unpaid overtime.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Instead of getting in a temp teller we were left with 2 tellers for 3 months so that means no lunch breaks (not allowed). I left everyday with a splitting headache. How is it possible to sell if you have like 250+ transactions in a day and lineups with 30 people. Nightmare.
While I find it difficult to believe that any branch would run its operations with only 2 CSR's for 3 months, I find it even harder to believe that you were not allowed lunch. The employment standards act require employers to allow time for lunch - even if you were a part time employee - working an entire day with no lunch break are grounds for an independent lawsuit. Either way, you should've had a backbone and discuss this with your management and escalate if necessary.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
That's the problem, obviously some branches are a lot better than others. I was at the main branch for CIBC in CANADA and everyone I spoke with admitted having the same problems. This is why CIBC is ranked lowest out of all the other banks.
You honestly believe CIBC is ranked 4th out of the big banks because of internal issues at some of its branches? As I clarified in my previous comments, CIBC is not 4th because of its nazi-like working environment at some of its branches. To say that is the reason or even a contributing reason is just plain ignorant.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
150-200 EJ's is fine if you have decent people working with you, the ability to sit and get paid overtime if needed. We didn't even get lunch breaks and were threatened to be fired if we didn't get x amount of sales.
I find it hard to believe that CIBC will just simply fire people because they did not meet their sales targets. The fact is, you have to consistently keep missing your targets before they can let you go. I also find it hard to believe that the BM's and ABM's would give a direct threat to their staff. What I am more inclined to believe is that the sales teams are advised that it was critical to meet the sales target. The notion of dismissal was likely perceived on your own accord given the demands.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
That's just morally wrong, but it happens all the time. If you're a CFP (which most people aren't, you have the fiduciary responsibility to only "make a sale" in the interest of your client and not push products...
The same could be argued that CSR's have a fiduciary responsibility to make recommendations/make aware to customers of products that could meet their needs.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
Sure, CIBC is drastically trying to keep up with Scotia and BMO. They have the hopes of being no. 2 within 1 year...Not possible. They're ranked lowest on client satisfaction, and lowest in assets.
As far as I know, CIBC has never set its target goal to become the number 2 bank, nor would they even plan to do this in 1 year. CIBC's leadership teams follow the SMART objectives principle so I find it hard to believe that CIBC would have such goal or vision - and even more into question, where you are getting information from.
Deal Addict
Mar 24, 2005
1320 posts
95 upvotes
Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
They don't make a lot. 99 percent of them cannot trade in any kind of derivative product and they are grossly limited to the products that cibc offers.
Do you even understand derivatives trading? Do you honestly think customers on the street would want to trade in derivatives or even understand it? They're primarily used to hedge risk. Branches will push the bank's products - customers have a choice to go with the branch's choices or go with their own investment decisions and product choices and do their own self-directed trading with CIBC, or through the full serviced channels.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
We're supposed to get people in an office for the FSR to do a checking account upgrade, savings accounts, GIC's, Credit cards (that's the big one for us), if you see an opportunity probe for a mortgage. You're not allowed to discuss anything to do with mutual funds or stocks/bonds, even though I am licensed as a registered representative with IIROC but am obviously only working as a teller.
As a CSR, your role does not allow you to make any recommendations or have any conversations on investments. Does not matter if you're licensed. That is someone else's job. Most CSR's do not have their registration and as such, you cannot have a conflict of interest between roles. Customers should only be talking to the appropiate person in that role. As a CSR, you are not in that position.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
How did I get the job? I slept with someone that worked in Capital Markets. She was kind enough to put in a great word for me (lol) and I used her as a referral.
Again, you have got to get out of your immature mind that sleeping your way around is a good way of making it. You'll learn quickly that this only gets you a job that everyone else can get without sleeping with someone.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
CIBC is well known as the worst bank, especially in how they treat their employees. There are several class action lawsuits right now. We were not paid for overtime, often didn't get lunch breaks and were forced to stand all day, not allowed any stool or anything
None of the class action lawsuits have to do with unpaid overtime right now. Being force to stand all day is the same at almost every bank and does not qualify as an arguement for CIBC being the worst bank.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
I quit because 2 people randomly quit one day and we were grossly short-staffed. They would make me come in with no notice and do the job of 3 people. I'd leave everyday with a splitting headache and my manager was a pain in the butt that didn't even have a college diploma or university degree.
You don't need to have a university degree to be a manager. Skills and experience will trump university education. I know a person who doesn't have a university degree and makes WELL into the 6 figure range, base salary alone.


Derivative wrote:
Aug 9th, 2011 3:58 pm
They do pay the lowest out of all the banks, have the worst service, and most backwards computer system. Seriously, it's freaking MS-DOS and it breaks down constantly. Once the computers were down for 3 hours during the day. I had to explain this to people and they wanted to like spit on me, they couldn't believe it.
Again, you don't know the difference between MS-DOS and mainframe terminal windows. Also, like you said yourself, the pay is roughly the same for the CSR role. It doesn't matter when we're talking about such a small difference.
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