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I want to get a Dobermann...what do I need to know?

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  • Nov 26th, 2016 8:12 am
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[OP]
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Oct 16, 2008
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I want to get a Dobermann...what do I need to know?

How do I assess if a Doberman is the "right breed" for me? Any precautions I should take?

Can I raise them so that I can absolutely trust them when left with small pets or babies? Will they ever "snap" or be provoked, or have their instincts take over?
22 replies
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
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British Columbia
One person's experience is not the same as another's. Dogs are instictive, and really you cannot say what they might or might not do. In general their personality is passed down from their parents but also shaped by their first few critical months of life.

They are not for first time dog owners, in my opinion. They are very energetic and if you have a busy lifestyle you should rethink getting a working breed. They need training - you do NOT want an out of control Domberman. Do your research and if you're concerned about biting consider a Golden Retriever or a Lab, they usually have very stable temperaments and love everyone.
Last edited by Karala on Oct 7th, 2016 1:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Sep 21, 2010
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Go to dobermantalk, great info there.
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Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2011
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Kitchener
never leave any breed of dog alone with children or small animals. Also dogs don't just snap, usually people ignore dog's warning signs before they bite, read up on dog body language and understand that dogs will defend themselves if they have too
http://www.doggonesafe.com/why_dogs_bite

I also wouldn't recommend a dobe for first time dog owners and tbh it sounds like you have a lot of research to do before getting any dog. You need to have a little bit of understanding of dog behaviour. If you do decide to get one make absolutely sure that they are properly health tested, dobes are prone to many conditions but most notably heart conditions, in which an estimated 50% of the breed are effected.
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Jan 28, 2014
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I agree that a Doberman would not be the right breed for the normal first time dog owner. There are exceptions of course.

Perhaps MrsPotato will see this post and answer - she has Doberman pups.
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Apr 23, 2009
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starrlamia wrote:
Oct 7th, 2016 9:02 am
never leave any breed of dog alone with children or small animals. Also dogs don't just snap, usually people ignore dog's warning signs before they bite, read up on dog body language and understand that dogs will defend themselves if they have too
http://www.doggonesafe.com/why_dogs_bite

I also wouldn't recommend a dobe for first time dog owners and tbh it sounds like you have a lot of research to do before getting any dog. You need to have a little bit of understanding of dog behaviour. If you do decide to get one make absolutely sure that they are properly health tested, dobes are prone to many conditions but most notably heart conditions, in which an estimated 50% of the breed are effected.
100% agree with this. People see dog's but don't know what a certain eye roll, yawn, or other behaviour means, Or they just ignore it, think it's funny/cute. For a first time dog owner, be very sure you are prepared for a breed like a doberman. (I think a regular poster on here has Dobies? Mrs. Potato? SHe can give you a lot of good information about them).
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May 22, 2016
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Not a good breed for kids. We had one and she seemed to decide she didn't like some ppl which was fine but they would keep trying to pet her and we would have to keep an eye on her which is impossible to do with kids, Otherwise she was a great dog.
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webshark wrote:
Oct 8th, 2016 1:05 am
Not a good breed for kids. We had one and she seemed to decide she didn't like some ppl which was fine but they would keep trying to pet her and we would have to keep an eye on her which is impossible to do with kids, Otherwise she was a great dog.
My dobes are fantastic with young children and babies.
One of my dobe boys works with autistic kids at a local school program.

They're definitely not an easy breed.

Dobermantalk is a great resource.
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Just don't do that crappy thing with the ears. That and tail docking really tick me off.
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JC69 wrote:
Oct 12th, 2016 1:55 pm
Just don't do that crappy thing with the ears. That and tail docking really tick me off.
Yeah, cropping ears and docking tails is animal abuse. There's no justification for putting an animal in pain for an owner's cosmetic preferences.
Jr. Member
Jul 17, 2011
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Ear crop and tail dock are cosmetic procedures that do not benefit a dog. Avoid it. Also if you get a doberman make sure the parents have been screened for heart disease and blood clotting disorders at minimum. Very common in dobermans and good breeders will make sure they try to as much as possible avoid breeding affected animals.
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I won't comment on the ear cropping, however tail docking isn't for strictly for look purposes; anyone with a very long tailed dog (Dane, uncropped vizsla) will know the struggle of the broken tail and how often they need to be amputated because of them flailing around and hitting walls ect. And then rotting off.
Docking a tail later in life is far more painful and a much larger procedure!
[OP]
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Thank you all for your input. The thing about Doberman not being a good starter dog...I really really want a Doberman though...Disappointed But Relieved Face I promise I will do everything I can and be a good dog....owner. Is this still not good enough?
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Apr 25, 2011
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ilove wrote:
Oct 14th, 2016 10:39 pm
Thank you all for your input. The thing about Doberman not being a good starter dog...I really really want a Doberman though...Disappointed But Relieved Face I promise I will do everything I can and be a good dog....owner. Is this still not good enough?
We can't tell you what to do, but you need to seriously evauate your life and the commitment you have for a dog. Why do you want a Doberman? If it is based on looks that is the last reason to get a dog.

So many people are running around with Huskies these days simply because they look "cool" and the dogs couldn't be more out of control; a danger to other animals and unresponsive to owners and destructive due to boredom. The opposite end of the energy spectrum there's all the people running around with Frenchies and Bulldogs; they are so unhealthy and the owners are so clueless just getting a dog because it's "cute".

You should understand how dogs think and you should have a good working understanding of the time and energy the breed you are interested in will take up. If you have concerns about prey drive or biting then don't get a Doberman, it isn't the breed for you.

Remeber: No matter the dog you get you'll fall in love with it. However, jumping in the deep end with a dog like a Doberman isn't the best plan. Where many dog breeds may require lighter amounts of training and exercise, and are ready for whatever you want to do, working breeds NEED to do something and YOU better be ready for them.

I have an Aussie (working/herding breed) and she will start rolling around on the floor insanely with a toy out of pure boredom if she doesn't get running time off leash at least an hour or more daily (often broken up because she's ready to go again a little while later), and she gets into EVERYTHING when bored. She ripped down wallpaper once... Compared to my other dog (mix) that is low-key and happy to sleep all day -- she's also happy to do anything else but does not require it. It's like night and day their exercise requirements.
Last edited by Karala on Oct 14th, 2016 11:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
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Oct 16, 2008
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To answer your question as to why I want a doberman, my family used to have a Doberman/German Shepherd mix when I was young. She was the most beautiful dog ever. She was such a gentle soul too. I have been obsessed with Dobermans lately. Yes they look good to boot.

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