• Last Updated:
  • Feb 13th, 2019 4:48 pm
[OP]
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
24043 posts
9555 upvotes

Ice Cream Recipes

I thought I had a thread with recipes, but I can't actually find it so I'm gonna make a new one at the request of @SuperNaut

A)
1L Cream
500g Milk
150g Sugar
200g Corn Syrup
4g Salt
60g Powdered Milk

B)
216g Egg Yolks (roughly 12)
100g Sugar

Mix A and B separately.
Heat A. Temper in B. Bring to 180F.
Strain.
Portion 500g units.
Chill.

Combine with 250g flavor pack (below) and churn.
Last edited by death_hawk on Feb 8th, 2019 11:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.
19 replies
[OP]
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
24043 posts
9555 upvotes
Heat, strain (as needed), chill, unless otherwise noted.
Most of these should be 250g after straining. Double check to make sure.

I'll add more when I feel like it, I have a bunch of testing recipes that are all over the place.
I made quite a few different ones that I didn't write down and just winged. I've been meaning to recreate them.

Strawberry:
2:1 Frozen Strawberry:Sugar
Mascerate overnight in fridge.

Chocolate:
13g Cocoa
89g 55% Callebaut
159g Cream

Vanilla:
50g Sugar
200g Cream
1 Vanilla bean

Thai Iced Tea:
125g Cream
40g Thai Iced Tea leaves (or more like powder...)
150g Sweetened condensed milk

Mint Chip:
250g Cream
1g Peppermint Oil

100g Small Chocolate Chips (add during churning)
Last edited by death_hawk on Feb 9th, 2019 12:09 am, edited 3 times in total.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Feb 1, 2018
117 posts
61 upvotes
death_hawk wrote:
Feb 8th, 2019 11:51 pm
I thought I had a thread with recipes, but I can't actually find it so I'm gonna make a new one at the request of @SuperNaut
It will be nice if you can make a video with the result. I tried fewer time before with Cuisine Art Ice Cream Maker and the Ginger ice cream became hard the next day, so I am sure the company adds something to keep it soft. End up cleaning all the mess and sold my ice cream maker...
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
9605 posts
1269 upvotes
Unless there is some gumming agent, the ice cream will be always hard I found. However, that does not stop me from making my own ice cream.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
24043 posts
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MockingJayTM wrote:
Feb 9th, 2019 9:31 am
It will be nice if you can make a video with the result. I tried fewer time before with Cuisine Art Ice Cream Maker and the Ginger ice cream became hard the next day, so I am sure the company adds something to keep it soft. End up cleaning all the mess and sold my ice cream maker...
It for sure hardens.
It also doesn't help that general freezers are kept extremely cold.
Optimum scooping temperature is more like -15C.

You do need other stuff to make it easily scoopable at regular freezer temps, but I don't really see this as a bad thing.
Member
Dec 31, 2007
401 posts
103 upvotes
real home made custard ice cream is supposed to be hard. the mass produced stuff has so much air fluffed into it and they don't use carrageenan to emulsify. hagen daas is custard based and is hard ice cream.

when making ice cream from scratch is quite important to allow enough air to get mixed in before putting it into the freezer. if not, you'll get solid rock ice cream once it gets frozen.

i generally let my ice cream sit at room temp for 5 minutes or so to making scooping easier. home made ice cream blows the store bought stuff away.
Member
Dec 31, 2007
401 posts
103 upvotes
here's my recipe for a ridiculously fattening ice cream, but its quite good.

2 cups 35% cream
1 cup 10% cream
9 egg yolks
85 g sugar

1. heat the cream mixture over low medium heat. be careful not to boil to cream. i think they say 140 to 160 deg f to ensure food safety.
2. in a separate mixing bowl, separate 9 egg yolks whisk to get consistent yolk mix. and add sugar and whisk to get decent mix.
3. once the cream is ready, ladle some hot cream into the yolk/sugar mix. this prevents the eggs from "cooking". continue adding cream to custard mix and whisk gently to prevent curdling. once you've added half of the cream into the custard mix, you can pour the custard mix into the remaining cream.
4. gently heat the custard to 140 to 160 deg f to kill any bacteria.
5. you can now add your flavor base.

flavor base
coffee - use 7 g coffee powder. i found nescafe gives a great coffee flavor. you should to dissolve the coffee using about .5 cup hot custard mix to get better mixing.
green tea - use 7 g matcha tea powder. matcha doesn't dissolve well, it kinda clumps, so use .5 cup hot custard to get it into a slurry
strawberries - use about a cup. mascerate with half of the sugar (45 g for the fruit and 40 g for the custard)
bluberries - use about a cup. mascerate with half of the sugar (45 g for the fruit and 40 g for the custard)
cherries - use about a cup. mascerate with half of the sugar (45 g for the fruit and 40 g for the custard)


final steps in mixing flavor with custard, and making ice cream

1. mix the flavoring with the custard and gently heat to 140 to 160 deg f.
2. allow to cool and chill over night.
3. if using cuisinart IC maker. freeze bowl over night. very important leave it for about 24 hours, otherwise it won't be able to freeze the custard mix to the point the ICM will fold air into the mix.
4. assemble IC unit
4. pour chilled custard mix into frozen ICM bowl. allow IC maker to churn and fold in air for 10 to 15 minutes
5. as the mix starts to freeze it will fold air into the ice cream and the mix will expand. continue until the ice cream starts to spill over the top of the bowl.

i found that the bowl should be filled with about 750 to 900 ml of custard mix. and if the churned frozen custard mix reaches the top of the bowl, that's about 1.3 to 1.4 l. which is the right amount to store in a ice cream container. freeze overnight and enjoy the next day.

i actually double everything, as it's easier for me to use 1 litre of 35% cream. also it give better batch to batch consistency. i just have to do it over two days. the best fruit flavor i've made are the berries and mango. the worst was pineapple. i found fresh pineapple curdles the custard and leaves a bitter aftertaste.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
9605 posts
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^ Wow I never use more than 4 eggs to 1L of cream/milk + 1 cup sugar.

Maybe I should try it with more eggs, but I find 4 egg yolks is plenty lol
Member
Dec 31, 2007
401 posts
103 upvotes
speedyforme wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 8:12 am
^ Wow I never use more than 4 eggs to 1L of cream/milk + 1 cup sugar.

Maybe I should try it with more eggs, but I find 4 egg yolks is plenty lol
i think the yolks acts as an emulsifier and allow the mix to absorb more air as it is being churned. without the air, you're going to get pretty rock hard ice cream. that's why the store bought cheap "ice desserts" uses carrageenan instead of egg yolks. if you pick up a container of the cheap stuff and compare it against a similar volume of hageen daas, you'll notice right away the weight differential. the volume is the same, but the lighter stuff means you're paying for air.

also you'll notice if you leave a container of "frozen dairy dessert" in the freezer for a long time, say 6 months or more, the water in the frozen dairy stuff will sublime and form ice crystals on the top of the container. i don't notice that too much with home made ice cream.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
9605 posts
1269 upvotes
gladiator1942 wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 2:49 pm
i think the yolks acts as an emulsifier and allow the mix to absorb more air as it is being churned. without the air, you're going to get pretty rock hard ice cream. that's why the store bought cheap "ice desserts" uses carrageenan instead of egg yolks. if you pick up a container of the cheap stuff and compare it against a similar volume of hageen daas, you'll notice right away the weight differential. the volume is the same, but the lighter stuff means you're paying for air.

also you'll notice if you leave a container of "frozen dairy dessert" in the freezer for a long time, say 6 months or more, the water in the frozen dairy stuff will sublime and form ice crystals on the top of the container. i don't notice that too much with home made ice cream.
Hm interesting. Maybe Ill add in a few more eggs and see if its a bit fluffier and less hard next time.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
24043 posts
9555 upvotes
Oh good! More people that love ice cream! Like real ice cream, none of this frozen dessert crap.
gladiator1942 wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 2:49 pm
if you pick up a container of the cheap stuff and compare it against a similar volume of hageen daas, you'll notice right away the weight differential. the volume is the same, but the lighter stuff means you're paying for air.
My running joke is that if you replace air with helium in a thing of Chapman's the damn thing will float away.

The 4L tubs are just as bad. They're about the same weight wise (damn near anyway) as 500mL containers.
They're also horribly unsatisfying to eat. All you need of a good ice cream is a single scoop. It's rich and fulfilling enough that a small portion is all that's needed.
Compared to the junk that people consider ice cream, you have to eat an entire 4L bucket.
Jr. Member
Mar 12, 2018
171 posts
160 upvotes
It should at least be easily scoopable after about 5 minutes on the counter. Switching to liquid sugars (mainly whitecorn syrup, honey, or maple syrup) made a huge difference to my recipes and their scoopability.

No recipes since they're easy to figure out, but saffron and honey, saffron and orange, lavender and honey, coffee with raspberry swirl, mint with stracciatella-like chocolate crackles, and cherry cheesecake with white chocolate have been my favourites that I've made, especially the saffron ones.
Newbie
May 30, 2015
33 posts
21 upvotes
New Westminster, BC
If the ice cream isn’t for kids. A general thing I do is add some neutral spirits such as vodka to drop the freezing point = softer ice cream.

Or a highland scotch vanilla ice cream.... nom nom
Penalty Box
Feb 22, 2016
3331 posts
2533 upvotes
gladiator1942 wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 2:49 pm
you'll notice if you leave a container of "frozen dairy dessert" in the freezer for a long time, say 6 months or more, the water in the frozen dairy stuff will sublime and form ice crystals on the top of the container.
Also if you leave "frozen dairy dessert" out at room temperature it doesn't melt into a puddle of liquid, it will continue to hold its shape like shaving cream. Real ice cream melts.
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