Students

Locked: If you have a choice: Do not go to UofT

  • Last Updated:
  • May 15th, 2017 12:11 am
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 19, 2003
4548 posts
99 upvotes
London
commie wrote:Why would you say that someone going to York and getting an A+ is not challenging themselfs? Its not just UofT that challenges the students.
I am sure there are other universities that will 'challenge', explore your limits, learn about yourself, besides UofT.
Even Lakehead, Trent, and other smaller uni's pose the challenge....

Problem I see with UofT is that they are so self-centered....Its almost like just because they are the biggest uni in Canada, they are the best or the most challenging or hardest.
If they see other students doing well at other uni's they immediately defend themselves by saying its much harder at UOFT...

Every university has its share of hard and easy programs...good and bad students...
I've done some comparison between course materials and evaluations, and it is my opinion that UT has harder tests and more stringent academic standards.

Does that mean it's better? No. I staunchly believe that one should apply to an educational institute based on how that institute's approach will complement your intellectual abilities, and how it will allow one to grow and mature. If that evaluation takes you to York, or Lakehead, or wherever, then go right ahead. In fact, I have utmost respect towards Lakehead as an institute -- their smaller class sizes will probably work very well with some who thrive under those conditions. One of my friends chose to go into McMaster Geology for that exact reason -- because it was a lot more personal.

I didn't intend my rant to come off as saying that UT is more challenging than other schools -- the intent was to defend criticism towards UT by saying it is a challenging school. My comment about York was intended to be taken in context with the other discussions going on in this thread -- i.e. "Go to York and get an A+"

So it would seem appropriate for me to further elaborate my position at this point -- what does irk me, however, is how many here seem to base their opinion on the quality of the school by marks. Aside from the fact that they mean nothing in most of the workforce, it also reflects nothing about how much you've learned or have grown. I just feel that it's silly and superficial to base one's enrollment decision -- which is very much a life-changing one -- on a superficial number that may as well be randomly determined.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 18, 2004
1741 posts
99 upvotes
Toronto
I find it funny that people are saying "oh if you go to York, you can get A's", as to assume that students who DO get A's at York are not putting any effort into their work, challenging themselves, pulling all-nighters studying, etc. Pretty much an assumption that a dumb@ss could get good marks.

It'd be nice for those people who think that to actually take a class at York (and NOT a "bird class") and see if that proves to be true.

Anyhow, I'm sure there are always going to be the idiots who can't spell or write proper, grammatically correct sentences at York and yet still seem to be getting by, with A's even. But that isn't to say that those who go to U of T are by default smarter and more intelligent because, trust me, I've seen MANY, many U of T students on the internet (on RFD even) who have horrid basic English skills.

BTW, I did get into U of T St George campus but chose York for its interdisciplinary program and its distance from my home. So don't think this is a "OMGZZZ DISGRUNTLED REJECTED U of T STUDENT" message.
Newbie
Feb 17, 2005
75 posts
rockthecasbah wrote:really?
http://www.macleans.ca/universities/

Unless you mean their ranking of MEDICAL DOCTORAL schools... because I don't see U of T listed on the primarily undergraduate or comprehensive rankings.

p.s. Macleans isn't really THE source for universities info. If memory serves me correct, it was this (or the Globe and Mail) article that ranked York's medical school -- where there isn't actually a medical school.
i think you misread the ranking.Macleans wanna make everybody happy. So they divide all the universities into 3 different group sby their main advantages.
So you dont see any dupilcates in any of the 3 groups ;)
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 13, 2004
9964 posts
445 upvotes
Mississauga
I've just finished my degree from UofT, and I loved it.

I was also a TA, so I know the politics. Within any large class (> 40-50 students in size), there should not be more then 20% of students who earn 80% or higher. Also, there should not be more then 10-15% of students who fail. Finally, the class average should be between 60-75%. All of these conditions are enforced at the department level, so it can vary department to department.

Finally, there are always exceptions. In these cases, the professor must substantiate the reason for the class marks to get approved.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 13, 2004
9964 posts
445 upvotes
Mississauga
Daboss wrote:Here's one for you guys. I am a graduate of UofT. I finished with an Hon. BSc with high distinction (MAJ Human Biology & MAJ Human Physiology). I am currently doing a joint MD/MBA at McGill University, and can say without a doubt that attending UofT was the single worst experience of my life. I got the marks, but the stress, politics, and sacrifice just wasn't worth it in the end.

I saw many of my diligent and hard working friends loose sight of their hopes and dreams because of the negative and ultimately self-destructive learning environment that UofT fosters and embraces. Nervous breakdowns, anxiety disorders, and panic attacks seem to be a little too prevalent at this school. I
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 13, 2004
9964 posts
445 upvotes
Mississauga
rockthecasbah wrote: Anyhow, I'm sure there are always going to be the idiots who can't spell or write proper, grammatically correct sentences at York and yet still seem to be getting by, with A's even. But that isn't to say that those who go to U of T are by default smarter and more intelligent because, trust me, I've seen MANY, many U of T students on the internet (on RFD even) who have horrid basic English skills.

Hate to break it to you, but there are more degrees then just an Arts degrees. You don't need excellent English skills to take a degree in the Sciences.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 18, 2004
1741 posts
99 upvotes
Toronto
cuiyinghost wrote:i think you misread the ranking.Macleans wanna make everybody happy. So they divide all the universities into 3 different group sby their main advantages.
So you dont see any dupilcates in any of the 3 groups ;)
Oh I see, I see :)

Also, where can one find the older rankings for Macleans anyways?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 18, 2004
1741 posts
99 upvotes
Toronto
dmdsoftware2 wrote:Hate to break it to you, but there are more degrees then just an Arts degrees. You don't need excellent English skills to take a degree in the Sciences.
I never said excellent English skills, notice I said "I've seen MANY, many U of T students on the internet (on RFD even) who have horrid basic English skills.".

Basic meaning the difference between you're/your, than/then (i.e. there are more degrees than just an Arts degree), their/there/they're, it's/its, etc. These are grammar skills we were taught in elementary.

I'm not talking about "excellent English skills" as in perfect sentence structure, perfect spelling and whatnot. Just SIMPLE grammar.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Dec 6, 2003
812 posts
Toronto
dmdsoftware2 wrote:I've just finished my degree from UofT, and I loved it.

I was also a TA, so I know the politics. Within any large class (> 40-50 students in size), there should not be more then 20% of students who earn 80% or higher. Also, there should not be more then 10-15% of students who fail. Finally, the class average should be between 60-75%. All of these conditions are enforced at the department level, so it can vary department to department.

Finally, there are always exceptions. In these cases, the professor must substantiate the reason for the class marks to get approved.
Woohoo! Inside news! How much pay per hour? ;) Btw, what do you do with the twenties I staple with my test? j/k!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 13, 2004
9964 posts
445 upvotes
Mississauga
rockthecasbah wrote: These are grammar skills we were taught in elementary.
Not for the many many many students who came over to Canada just for University. Many of these students just started learning English.

My English skills have actually decreased since attending High School due to the fact that I was surrounded by too many foreign students speaking in broken english in my University Science classes.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 9, 2003
797 posts
15 upvotes
I acepted U of T. And Ive Had many People tell me they loved it. They are all family. And Had a blast at U of T.

if you go to U of T post Your College And Your Major.

St George.
New College
Computer Science
First Year.
Member
User avatar
Oct 7, 2003
362 posts
St George
New College (res)
Elect Engineering

YR1
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 19, 2003
4548 posts
99 upvotes
London
rockthecasbah wrote:I never said excellent English skills, notice I said "I've seen MANY, many U of T students on the internet (on RFD even) who have horrid basic English skills.".

Basic meaning the difference between you're/your, than/then (i.e. there are more degrees than just an Arts degree), their/there/they're, it's/its, etc. These are grammar skills we were taught in elementary.

I'm not talking about "excellent English skills" as in perfect sentence structure, perfect spelling and whatnot. Just SIMPLE grammar.
Yeah I'm surprised too...it's as if people don't have respect for the language. Oh well...we're not the grammar police :razz: .
dmdsoftware2 wrote:I've just finished my degree from UofT, and I loved it.

I was also a TA, so I know the politics. Within any large class (> 40-50 students in size), there should not be more then 20% of students who earn 80% or higher. Also, there should not be more then 10-15% of students who fail. Finally, the class average should be between 60-75%. All of these conditions are enforced at the department level, so it can vary department to department.

Finally, there are always exceptions. In these cases, the professor must substantiate the reason for the class marks to get approved.
That's basically how it works. For courses less than ~30 (don't remember the exact number) the professor isn't subjected to the scrutiny that larger class sizes are towards having a marks distribution that fall into the cookie cutter mold. This is partly the reason why VIC120 was canned -- too many high marks.

I never liked the bell curve system -- it's a dodgy way to do things IMHO. I'm getting good enough marks to be able to "ride the curve" so to speak, but nonetheless I find it somewhat hypocritical that science profs, of all the people, apply it so liberally and carelessly. It's them who condemn the fudging of data as the ultimate of evil. Yet instead of reflecting that maybe their teaching methods are inept, or that their evaluation method is ineffective, they fudge the "data" (aka marks) year after year so that they agree with the canonical distribution. It's dodgy, and the students aren't getting their money's worth on a good education.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2002
2953 posts
9 upvotes
0
How does UofT compare to UBC and SFU? How about the Ivy Leagues and MIT? (Not that I would be able to get in. :D )

Top