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ILC Grade 11 Math Mixed vs College

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 9th, 2018 7:41 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 21, 2010
26 posts
Brampton

ILC Grade 11 Math Mixed vs College

Hey guys, quick question.
So I'm on ILC doing Grade 10 math soon after just finishing grade 9 college, and wanted to prepare for the future college course I want to take.
I would like to know how much harder is Grade 11 mixed math vs college? Especially relative to grade 10 college math? I'm not personally the best in math as a heads up, but definitely need this info before I finish grade 10 and have to choose which option to take.
6 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
1848 posts
466 upvotes
Woodbridge
Mixed is more theoretical "mathy" stuff: quadratics, trig and exponential functions. College is more applicable: personal finance, data management, geometry. I'd imagine that the Grade 11 mixed course would be difficult for someone without the foundation of Grade 10 academic. Difficult, but not impossible. What are your Grade 12 and post-secondary plans?

Some info on the mixed course:

The Grade 11 university/college preparation course, Functions and Applications,providespreparation for students who plan to pursue technology-related programs in college, whilealso leaving the option open for some students to pursue postsecondary programs thatrequire the Grade 12 university preparation course Mathematics of Data Management.The Functions and Applications course explores functions by revisiting key concepts fromthe Grade 10 mathematics curriculum and by using a more applied approach with lessemphasis on abstract concepts than in the Grade 11 university preparation course, Functions. The first strand, Quadratic Functions, extends knowledge and skills related to quadratics for students who completed the Grade 10 applied mathematics course andreviews this topic for students entering from the Grade 10 academic course. The strandalso introduces some of the properties of functions. The other two strands, ExponentialFunctions and Trigonometric Functions, emphasize real-world applications and help students develop the knowledge and skills needed to solve problems related to theseapplications.

And the college course:

The Grade 11 college preparation course,Foundations for College Mathematics,includesa blend of topics needed by students who plan to pursue one of a broad range of collegeprograms. The course has been designed with four strands that address different areas ofmathematics. The Mathematical Models strand uses the concepts connected to linear andquadratic relations developed in the Grade 9 and 10 applied mathematics courses torevisit quadratic relations and introduce exponential relations. The Personal Financestrand focuses on compound interest and applications related to investing and borrowingmoney and owning and operating a vehicle. Applications requiring spatial reasoning areaddressed in the Geometry and Trigonometry strand. The fourth strand, DataManagement, explores practical applications of one-variable statistics and probability.

And the detailed curriculum: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum ... 2currb.pdf
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 21, 2010
26 posts
Brampton
Im planning on getting into Networking + Security sect of IT.

So in your description, if you were to rate the difficulty of College Vs M vs Uni if I've only been doing College level courses, what would you rate it?
The good thing on ILC is, you have time to do stuff, and practice concepts.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
1848 posts
466 upvotes
Woodbridge
Jag_Ducati wrote:
Jul 4th, 2018 8:05 pm
Im planning on getting into Networking + Security sect of IT.

So in your description, if you were to rate the difficulty of College Vs M vs Uni if I've only been doing College level courses, what would you rate it?
The good thing on ILC is, you have time to do stuff, and practice concepts.
I take a pragmatic approach to this. I would say to look at the prerequisites of the post-secondary program(s) you want to go to and take those prerequisites. The workload and content of the M course is clearly more difficult than that of the C course, particularly if you took applied courses in grades 9 and 10. If you don't need it, you'll just be causing yourself stress and negatively affect the rest of your courses. Also, the C course has some valuable material in it. Data Management and Personal Finance are two units that aren't covered in Grade 9, 10, or any Grade 11 M/U or Grade 12 M/U (except Grade 12 Data) courses.

I should say that I teach grade 8. My opinion on this is based on my limited understanding of the courses themselves and conversations with colleagues and former students speaking about their experience in high school. If you can actually find a secondary math teacher they'd be able to specifically tell you how difficult the Grade 11 M course would be for someone with Grade 9/10 applied as their foundation.
Newbie
May 29, 2017
42 posts
12 upvotes
Save yourself wasted time and never take college or mixed math. You're better off ( in every way ) to take university. WHen you go college, you're taking the EXACT same university level classes you would have taken in highschool. You're better off learning it at highschool than college. Trust me... been there done that. Everything I learned at college ( took electronics engineering) was the same content you learn at highschool uni prep.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
1848 posts
466 upvotes
Woodbridge
Cnsr0033 wrote:
Jul 30th, 2018 12:33 am
Save yourself wasted time and never take college or mixed math. You're better off ( in every way ) to take university. WHen you go college, you're taking the EXACT same university level classes you would have taken in highschool. You're better off learning it at highschool than college. Trust me... been there done that. Everything I learned at college ( took electronics engineering) was the same content you learn at highschool uni prep.
I disagree. If somebody is not pursuing a degree or diploma that requires university math all they're doing is risking failing or putting themselves through a very difficult course for no reason. If you're taking math classes in university then you're probably in a program that requires university math anyway, in which case the point is moot.
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 21, 2010
26 posts
Brampton
jvnanu wrote:
Jul 30th, 2018 7:17 pm
I disagree. If somebody is not pursuing a degree or diploma that requires university math all they're doing is risking failing or putting themselves through a very difficult course for no reason. If you're taking math classes in university then you're probably in a program that requires university math anyway, in which case the point is moot.
100% agree to this. If someone is going into a program with bare math requirements, and has no future need for more advanced math nor does the program involve math, then its a waste of time stressing over the fact.

But it is a good advice so thanks. If I was deciding to get into a math field then it makes perfect sense to embrace myself for grade 11 and 12 uni math as itll be relevent.

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