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I'm a software engineer. How do I bring my gf to Silicon Valley?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 13th, 2017 12:23 pm
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Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
3680 posts
321 upvotes
Ottawa
imingwan wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 11:21 am
... the same thing can happen to Americans who are crossing into Canada.
Getting a bit off topic but I can confirm that it happens to Americans coming into Canada too.

A good friend of mine (40-something year old Canadian) was engaged to a 40-something year old American (not that it really matters but just wanted to mention that this happened to older professionals not just some high school / college kids backpacking or something ...). Before they were married, they decided to come live together in Canada since that's what they were going to do once married so she resigned from her job, packed up her things and they drove through CND Border together. She was denied entry and was banned indefinitely from Canada. They got married a few months later but I think it still took about 18 months (might have been more - I have ask him exactly how long) until they were able to get the ban lifted she was able to come to Canada. During that time, she wasn't even able to come for a short visit even if her husband lived in Canada. The worst part is that they were not able to get any idea of the timeline ... they didn't know if it was going to take 3 months or 3 years so she didn't know if she should look for work, etc (I think she end up doing work that she could do from home in the US or from Canada)

And this is for someone who lives in Ottawa and was able to deal in person with all the red tape and hoops to get this resolved.
Member
User avatar
Dec 2, 2010
414 posts
102 upvotes
Prairies
Walch1102 wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 12:12 pm
This is from experience? I live close to the border, cross probably 20 times a year and have many many friends who go every single week.
They've never had issues with crossing the border with girlfriends, friends, etc. One easy way is for her to drive herself, or book a plane / bus ticket back in advance. It's not that complicated, provide proof that they intend to return before their 6 months is up.
Depends what you mean by experience. I've never been denied entry myself, but having worked as an immigration officer for many years, I've seen just about everything.

I'm not saying you can't overcome objections. Having a return ticket is the simplest way to address any concern that you won't leave within the six months. Frequent travel to from the US (such as you and your friends) is also a strong point in your favour, i.e. showing that you have a history of entering and leaving within the six-month timeframe.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
4732 posts
2309 upvotes
Edmonton
Walch1102 wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 12:12 pm
This is from experience? I live close to the border, cross probably 20 times a year and have many many friends who go every single week.
They've never had issues with crossing the border with girlfriends, friends, etc. One easy way is for her to drive herself, or book a plane / bus ticket back in advance. It's not that complicated, provide proof that they intend to return before their 6 months is up.
The issue is that CBP agents can put 2 and 2 together. If one person is loaded up and moving down to the States for a new job, and the other person (that he's all lovey-dovey with at the station) says they're "just helping them unload and coming right back", they're smart enough to figure this is a higher risk situation compared to someone driving an empty car and saying they're going shopping in Seattle for the day. But once you get flagged, you're screwed.

Now if both people went down empty handed and said they were going to Disneyland for a week, and had their stuff shipped down after... Odds of the CBP agent turning them back are very slim.

The OP's question was "How can I bring her to work legally in the USA?", btw... Quick answer is, he can't.

C
Jr. Member
Feb 19, 2017
128 posts
63 upvotes
michelb wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 1:13 pm
Getting a bit off topic but I can confirm that it happens to Americans coming into Canada too.

A good friend of mine (40-something year old Canadian) was engaged to a 40-something year old American (not that it really matters but just wanted to mention that this happened to older professionals not just some high school / college kids backpacking or something ...). Before they were married, they decided to come live together in Canada since that's what they were going to do once married so she resigned from her job, packed up her things and they drove through CND Border together. She was denied entry and was banned indefinitely from Canada. They got married a few months later but I think it still took about 18 months (might have been more - I have ask him exactly how long) until they were able to get the ban lifted she was able to come to Canada. During that time, she wasn't even able to come for a short visit even if her husband lived in Canada. The worst part is that they were not able to get any idea of the timeline ... they didn't know if it was going to take 3 months or 3 years so she didn't know if she should look for work, etc (I think she end up doing work that she could do from home in the US or from Canada)

And this is for someone who lives in Ottawa and was able to deal in person with all the red tape and hoops to get this resolved.
I think people can avoid situations like this if they practiced a little common sense. It's not red tape. It's pure stupidity on their part.
Get married, apply for change in status, THEN move.

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