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Interlocking Front Entrance +Walkway BUT Downspout inbetween? (PIC Inside)

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Interlocking Front Entrance +Walkway BUT Downspout inbetween? (PIC Inside)

Hi guys.
We are in the middle of getting our interlocking project done (front walkway, landing) by a contractor but we came across this issue which I wanted to get some opinions or advice if possible

We bought our place couple of years ago and this wasn't an issue back in 07, after couple of winters the pipe from the downspout came up as you can see the photo and its literally causing the patio stone to become un-even.

Image

My Q is what are our choices and what we should do to properly address this issue?

Thanks

edit: option: (1) we were thinking of removing the pipe underneath and connect an L shaped pvc pipe to let the rain water fall on our driveway (but this may be an eyesore)

option (2) we can dig and hide the pipe but we see some houses around our area and even if they've done interlocking front, the pipe seems to come up again.
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That looks like a pretty bad DIY solution by someone who didn't know how to deal with the situation. To deal with it properly it shouldn't be solid plastic pipe like that. It should have been sock covered weeping tile buried down 3-4 feet deep (below the frost line). There then is a fitting for the weeping tile to connect the downspout into. If you have the room and want to go even further you could run the weeping tile into a french drain.
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CSK'sMom wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 10:42 am
That looks like a pretty bad DIY solution by someone who didn't know how to deal with the situation. To deal with it properly it shouldn't be solid plastic pipe like that. It should have been sock covered weeping tile buried down 3-4 feet deep (below the frost line). There then is a fitting for the weeping tile to connect the downspout into. If you have the room and want to go even further you could run the weeping tile into a french drain.
+1

I've done this several times. The fittings are sold at real landscaping places and even at HD. I've done a French drain once - and it worked out just fine.

I do not quarrel with the depth recommendation but have never gone deeper than 2' and, over a decade, have never had trouble here in Ottawa. I suspect it's because there's not much water flowing in the tiles in the winter...
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CSK'sMom wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 10:42 am
That looks like a pretty bad DIY solution by someone who didn't know how to deal with the situation. To deal with it properly it shouldn't be solid plastic pipe like that. It should have been sock covered weeping tile buried down 3-4 feet deep (below the frost line). There then is a fitting for the weeping tile to connect the downspout into. If you have the room and want to go even further you could run the weeping tile into a french drain.
@CSK: Yeah, I inquired and found out it was our seller who had this job done this way not the builder, but again at that time we didn't even notice this occuring nor did the inspector bring this up.

I'm assuming I gotta call a plumbing pro who can get this sorted out? The house across from me had the same problem and they're running the pipe straight through the grass beside their driveway...
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You can do it yourself and if your contractor is worth his weight he can do it as well. It's pretty simple, you can buy everything at HD or the like. Basically all you do is dig a trench, put some gravel in the bottom, lay the weeping tile, put some more stone over it and fill the rest of the trench with dirt.

Capt, ours under our driveway is probably not even 2 feet down. We couldn't get it any further down without bringing in machinery of some sort to dig the trench as it's a 20 year old gravel driveway. Needless to say it's well compacted. We've always been told that if possible it should be below the frost line so that is doesn't freeze up during a thaw in the winter or create a wet, swampy area during heavy rains in the warmer months. Ours in our driveway can occasionally seep to the surface in heavy rains at the end of the weeping tile but on the driveway it's not an issue for us.
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CSK'sMom wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 11:12 am
You can do it yourself and if your contractor is worth his weight he can do it as well. It's pretty simple, you can buy everything at HD or the like. Basically all you do is dig a trench, put some gravel in the bottom, lay the weeping tile, put some more stone over it and fill the rest of the trench with dirt.
+1

This really is an easy job - it's even better if you can run your weeping tile to an area where stormwater can drain away without causing problems. Also, remember to call before you dig!
CSK'sMom wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 11:12 am
Capt, ours under our driveway is probably not even 2 feet down. We couldn't get it any further down without bringing in machinery of some sort to dig the trench as it's a 20 year old gravel driveway. Needless to say it's well compacted. We've always been told that if possible it should be below the frost line so that is doesn't freeze up during a thaw in the winter or create a wet, swampy area during heavy rains in the warmer months. Ours in our driveway can occasionally seep to the surface in heavy rains at the end of the weeping tile but on the driveway it's not an issue for us.
Fair enough - if you can go deeper, you absolutely should. Especially if you're going under a driveway as that area wouldn't be "insulated" by a snow cover - in some spring conditions, you could have a mess.
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Why can't you just let the water run off your future walkway and onto the grass. Isn't that the simplest solution?
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Si98 wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 11:38 am
Why can't you just let the water run off your future walkway and onto the grass. Isn't that the simplest solution?
Yes - Okay,good question, my contractor actually suggested taking the entire pipe out from under the ground and where the downspout meets the pvc joint, attach a extension so the water falls on the interlocking landing/entrance.

Problem is and I heard that overtime, this may cause algi buildup or get stained unless I properly wash it every year and seal it (which I'm sure I will do every 2 years)

Yes, this sound liks an easy and simple idea to go with. Good Q Si98...I almost forgot about this option
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Yes - Okay,good question, my contractor actually suggested taking the entire pipe out from under the ground and where the downspout meets the pvc joint, attach a extension so the water falls on the interlocking landing/entrance.

Problem is and I heard that overtime, this may cause algi buildup or get stained unless I properly wash it every year and seal it (which I'm sure I will do every 2 years)

Yes, this sound liks an easy and simple idea to go with. Good Q Si98...I almost forgot about this option
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you may also find that the water from the spout erodes the foundation of the interlock etc. I personally would try to get the water as far away from the house as possible. I'm guessing there was a reason the previous owner went to that extent to remove the water.

from your option 1 - you could do this, but your driveway becomes a skating rink in winter.

from your option 2 - looks like you have a slope at the side that would be ideal for the pipe to easily discharge. Perhaps the neighbour's (and yours) have heaved due to being blocked/frozen?
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synaptech wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 12:22 pm
you may also find that the water from the spout erodes the foundation of the interlock etc. I personally would try to get the water as far away from the house as possible. I'm guessing there was a reason the previous owner went to that extent to remove the water.

from your option 1 - you could do this, but your driveway becomes a skating rink in winter.

from your option 2 - looks like you have a slope at the side that would be ideal for the pipe to easily discharge. Perhaps the neighbour's (and yours) have heaved due to being blocked/frozen?
Hi synaptech, yes, that is my biggest concern gradually eroding the interlocking which I wouldn't want.

Option 1 - in winter will be a sure problem unless we enter the house from the interlocked walkway and not from the driveway as we do now!

Option 2 - yes we actually do have a slope - may be digging deeper and hiding the pipe and put some compactingover would work......

Any other advice/ideas people :|
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Si98 wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 11:38 am
Why can't you just let the water run off your future walkway and onto the grass. Isn't that the simplest solution?
DealGiver wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 11:54 am
Yes - Okay,good question, my contractor actually suggested taking the entire pipe out from under the ground and where the downspout meets the pvc joint, attach a extension so the water falls on the interlocking landing/entrance.

Problem is and I heard that overtime, this may cause algi buildup or get stained unless I properly wash it every year and seal it (which I'm sure I will do every 2 years)

Yes, this sound liks an easy and simple idea to go with. Good Q Si98...I almost forgot about this option
I'll reply to both of these at the same time. If you don't divert the downspout and let it run over the sidewalk you'll end up with a skating rink in the winter. Any sun that melts snow from the roof will result in water and ice on the sidewalk and more often than not, black ice. Salt and interlock don't mix well either. And more likely than not, you'll end up with major heaving due to the saturation of the base under the interlock.

I agree with synaptech, ideally you want the water as far away from your foundation as possible. If that corner is a garage as I suspect I am wondering if that DIY fix was due to flooding the garage during heavy rain and melts as well as ice on the sidewalk. In our case we have a downspout on each corner of the garage and we essentially ended up with a flooded garage from under the door during melts and heavy rains. The water would pool in front of the garage and seep under the door.
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You've got my worried. I did an interlock patio and have a 4" PVC running clear under it for a good distance. I buried it 12 to 16 inches down (undewr base gravel).. I sure hope I am not dealing with any major heaving in the near future.

I have seen this method (solid PVC) used quite a bit in my area so I went with it without too much concern.
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mork wrote:
Jun 30th, 2009 3:16 pm
You've got my worried. I did an interlock patio and have a 4" PVC running clear under it for a good distance. I buried it 12 to 16 inches down (undewr base gravel).. I sure hope I am not dealing with any major heaving in the near future.

I have seen this method (solid PVC) used quite a bit in my area so I went with it without too much concern.
Hi mork: well I hope you don't get this mess....but my neighbor has the same pvc running under his interlocked walkway and landing (say 2 year old) and you can see the interlocked warping up in style as if the PVC/pipe is wanthing to come up just like in my situation..

that is why I'm trying to get opinions from all here and I beleive its a major issue specially in my area :(
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Ouch Mork. I can tell you what our neighbors are now dealing with. They hired so called concrete guys to add sidewalks to either side of their asphalt driveway right down to the curb. One side goes up the side of the garage to the backyard and the other to the front door. At the 2 front corners of the garage are downspouts. Their glorified handymen layed 4 inch pvc pipes about 12 inches down under the stone base and concrete and the ends open near the curb. It was the first winter last year. It froze and looks like it cracked the pipes about 2 feet from the corner of the garage which resulted in the concrete cracking and heaving in both spots. The concrete sidewalks were cut at regular intervals as well so that's not the issue. They asked us how to fix it after their handymen won't return their calls and we just shook our heads and said there really isn't much to be done other than rip it all out now.
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hmmm. So what is causing these PVC pipes to heave up? They are full of water when they freeze? Mine is very sloped and won't ever be filled with water.

or is it simply because it is a solid/rigid and the heaving earth beneath it pushes it up where in other areas compact as earth beneath it heaves?
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