Food & Drink

Jamaican food by non-Jamaicans is offensive?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 17th, 2017 4:00 pm
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Toukolou wrote:
Oct 8th, 2017 4:07 pm
Interesting, I never knew broccoli and shrimp were traditional Jamaican delicacies. I guess an asterisk beside a name is only required when it suits the complainers.

Reinterpreting ingredients and preparing them in the "style" of a certain culture or ethnicity is what food is all about. And thank God for that, or we would be facing a flavour stagnation of epic proportions!
'Broccoli and shrimp'... Are you referring to the Curry Shrimp in the photo? You can refer to their website (or visit the restaurant yourself) and determine for yourself if it's authentic. www.voyjamaican.com
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EastGTARedFlagger wrote:
Oct 5th, 2017 5:13 pm
Over there, it's pitched as an American product like hamburgers and hot dogs, not as Japanese. Watch the documentary "Jiro Dreams of Sushi" and tell me where in the movie Jiro Ono, the world's best sushi chef, or any of his sous-chefs, makes a California roll. (hint: you won't find it)
I always thought the California roll was started by the Japanese chef Hidekazu Tojo here in Vancouver.
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Any chef can cook any cuisine. The keyword is "Jamaican food"
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sandikosh wrote:
Oct 8th, 2017 4:58 pm
Nothing wrong with it as long as they don't call it "Authentic". Even some Chinese dishes contain ingredients not found in China.
Agreed, point is, nowhere in the name does it say "authentic".
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Raggie wrote:
Oct 8th, 2017 5:32 pm
'Broccoli and shrimp'... Are you referring to the Curry Shrimp in the photo? You can refer to their website (or visit the restaurant yourself) and determine for yourself if it's authentic. www.voyjamaican.com
It looks great. My point was, shrimp and broccoli are not traditional Jamaican recipe ingredients, yet it says "authentic" all over their menu and website. Why is that okay? Is it because they prepare nontraditional ingredients in traditional ways?

I happen to know the chef who's featured in the pictures on Chubby's Facebook page, and he's Jamaican. I don't think much of him as a chef, but he's still Jamaican.
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Toukolou wrote:
Oct 8th, 2017 3:51 pm
The first part says it all.

As for the second, taste is subjective. Maybe she thinks that all the Jamaican restaurants in Toronto are s**t, that's her opinion. Maybe she thinks she can do better, again her opinion. Everyone is entitled to their opinion.

People need to stop turning over stones, looking for a reason to get angry.
This.

Someone decided to write a story about this. Of course the person is going to say the common "entrepreneurial story" behind their restaurant and use the press for marketing.

Not saying an establishment or company should never praise another, but that wasn't the platform to do it.

What should the restaurant chef say? "I'm making a Jamaican food restaurant, just like all those other good ones in this city!". No. They want to sell their dining experience.
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Toukolou wrote:
Oct 9th, 2017 1:13 pm
It looks great. My point was, shrimp and broccoli are not traditional Jamaican recipe ingredients, yet it says "authentic" all over their menu and website. Why is that okay? Is it because they prepare nontraditional ingredients in traditional ways?

I happen to know the chef who's featured in the pictures on Chubby's Facebook page, and he's Jamaican. I don't think much of him as a chef, but he's still Jamaican.
The curry shrimp is actually on the Specials board. Now that I think of it, I actually think Voy should relabel themselves 'Jamaican-fusion', as they offer various other items with a spin on it, such as poutine, fish cakes, nachos, etc., Now I'm craving Voy to try out their poutine (been meaning to do that for a while now).
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Starbucks is “opening soon” in Jamaica (Montego Bay).

There is a poutine place in Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Hawaiian Pizza was invented in Southern Ontario. Do they serve it in Hawaii?
Toronto is a very small part of Canada
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Who invented those Chinese dishes like Kung Pow Chicken? I doubt a Chinese person did.
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Supercooled wrote:
Oct 10th, 2017 6:00 am
Who invented those Chinese dishes like Kung Pow Chicken? I doubt a Chinese person did.
Kung Pao chicken is a dish served in China? So probably a Chinese person did invent it?

Unless you're referring to stuff like General Tao/Tso/Whatever. But those we're also created by Chinese people to cater to western palates.
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In this day of effortless trade and easy travel around the world and widespread knowledge and learning opportunities, I would argue the there is simply no such thing as "authentic" cuisine. This is particularly true of foods that have become widespread internationally like French, Italian, Chinese, Indian, etc.

Look up "chow mein" and wikipedia lists about 10 international versions from American Chow Mien to Peruvian Chow Mien. There is also no "China Chow Mien". Does that mean it's not authentic? Ridiculous. The dish is served in any "legitimate" chinese restaurant in GTA and eaten by "real" chinese.

Jiro Ono is the worlds best sushi chef and runs a 3 Michelein star restaurant but does even he cook authentic? Does he do things differently, made any interpretations, modern preparation conveniences that differns from a chef from 200 years ago?

I bet Jacques Pepin uses different ingredients, methods, and tools than the top French chef 100 years ago. What makes him authentic? Yet I'm willing to bet his French dishes are much tastier and suits my palette better than the top French chef 100 years ago.

Dishes, ingredients, techniques evolve. Doesn't make the food any less good or less "authentic" IMO.
Last edited by DiceMan on Oct 10th, 2017 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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you are deemed racist by buying east indian ingredients from Costco rather than the authentic east indian store down the street...gimme a break
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Zewo wrote:
Oct 10th, 2017 11:39 am
Kung Pao chicken is a dish served in China? So probably a Chinese person did invent it?

Unless you're referring to stuff like General Tao/Tso/Whatever. But those we're also created by Chinese people to cater to western palates.
Why is the General Tao so red? I'm afraid to eat it.
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Raggie wrote:
Oct 10th, 2017 8:12 pm
Why is the General Tao so red? I'm afraid to eat it.s that another name for sweet and sour chicken?
that another name for sweet and sour chicken?
I love it with bell peppers and pineapple drenched in rice. Its like an Asian gumbo or jumbalaya.

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