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Jobs in construction administration?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 19th, 2017 9:03 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 14, 2014
174 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON

Jobs in construction administration?

I was looking to go into the construction field upon graduation and some of the jobs available to me are (assistant?) Site Coordinator, project coordinator, etc. For those of you who work in that field, how do you guys enjoy it? How are the hours and pay? How do you deal with temporary layoffs during the winter when there's no work?
12 replies
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4718 posts
850 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Aside from the engineer or trades, most construction work doesn’t involve post secondary. People in administrative/management roles are usually senior employees with many years of experience in the industry, or especially with their particular company. Getting a management credential usually does not fast track anyone.

Most construction is seasonal, yes. But management or other higher ups like foreman, forewoman, etc. work year round. Usually year round work is passed to the most senior employees first.

For myself I do oilfield work (winter is busiest; seasonal industry) or go to self employment during my off-season.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 14, 2014
174 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
FirstGear wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 5:55 pm
Aside from the engineer or trades, most construction work doesn’t involve post secondary. People in administrative/management roles are usually senior employees with many years of experience in the industry, or especially with their particular company. Getting a management credential usually does not fast track anyone.

Most construction is seasonal, yes. But management or other higher ups like foreman, forewoman, etc. work year round. Usually year round work is passed to the most senior employees first.

For myself I do oilfield work (winter is busiest; seasonal industry) or go to self employment during my off-season.
I'll be graduating with a diploma in Civil Engineering technology soon. If construction isn't good for entry level guys then where do you suggest I look?
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
2048 posts
322 upvotes
Edmonton
FirstGear wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 5:55 pm
Aside from the engineer or trades, most construction work doesn’t involve post secondary. People in administrative/management roles are usually senior employees with many years of experience in the industry, or especially with their particular company. Getting a management credential usually does not fast track anyone.

Most construction is seasonal, yes. But management or other higher ups like foreman, forewoman, etc. work year round. Usually year round work is passed to the most senior employees first.

For myself I do oilfield work (winter is busiest; seasonal industry) or go to self employment during my off-season.

Explain to me how a foreman works all year round when yet most regular workers are seasonal. Most places have approx 10 workers per 1 foreman


I don't know how road construction works but industrial construction is year round sort of thing. For workers and foremen (and so, included gf, super, etc etc) in the tradesman line of work. You can't get a foremen, general foremen or super position without a trades background (and red seal else you will be laughed off site by your own workers)
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
2048 posts
322 upvotes
Edmonton
Michaelp1990 wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 8:39 pm
I'll be graduating with a diploma in Civil Engineering technology soon. If construction isn't good for entry level guys then where do you suggest I look?
Engineering firm? Else go into trades?
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4718 posts
850 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
tmkf_patryk wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 8:47 pm
Explain to me how a foreman works all year round when yet most regular workers are seasonal. Most places have approx 10 workers per 1 foreman


I don't know how road construction works but industrial construction is year round sort of thing. For workers and foremen (and so, included gf, super, etc etc) in the tradesman line of work. You can't get a foremen, general foremen or super position without a trades background (and red seal else you will be laughed off site by your own workers)
Usually snow removal, dirt work, demolishing bush, indoor parts of projects (e.g. large commercial/industrial buildings, plants), or maintaining equipment in the shop, etc. Many construction companies do a wide diverse set of work but the more senior employees (especially foremen/forewomen) get first dibs for work in winter.
Michaelp1990 wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 8:39 pm
I'll be graduating with a diploma in Civil Engineering technology soon. If construction isn't good for entry level guys then where do you suggest I look?
Would you be looking for engineering technologist work then? From what I've heard they can do similar work as engineers with experience but don't have the authority to stamp/sign off certain papers, and/or their job title lets the employer pay them less.
Member
Feb 16, 2013
489 posts
523 upvotes
Toronto
Many of the people that end up in the office of a company are labourers that worked hard and have a brain.
They end up getting promoted into supervisory and management roles.
Having piece of paper is no substitute for experience.

The trades are similar. Individual tradesmen move up into supervisory and management roles.
Those are usually the people that are with a company for a long time that don't get permanently laid off.

It's all totem poles. Hours in the blue book, experience and reputation.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 14, 2014
174 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
cowbunpants wrote:
Oct 19th, 2017 8:07 pm
Many of the people that end up in the office of a company are labourers that worked hard and have a brain.
They end up getting promoted into supervisory and management roles.
Having piece of paper is no substitute for experience.

The trades are similar. Individual tradesmen move up into supervisory and management roles.
Those are usually the people that are with a company for a long time that don't get permanently laid off.

It's all totem poles. Hours in the blue book, experience and reputation.
So without actual hands-on experience as a laborer or some other role this program a waste of time? I don't mind starting at the bottom I just don't want to waste my time and tens of thousands of dollars. I already have a Civil Engineering Tech diploma so I was just looking to get a degree. I know there are other programs such as Construction Engineering Technology and such that prepare you for similar jobs but are those useless without some sort of construction experience as well?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 14, 2014
174 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
FirstGear wrote:
Oct 16th, 2017 5:55 pm
Aside from the engineer or trades, most construction work doesn’t involve post secondary. People in administrative/management roles are usually senior employees with many years of experience in the industry, or especially with their particular company. Getting a management credential usually does not fast track anyone.

Most construction is seasonal, yes. But management or other higher ups like foreman, forewoman, etc. work year round. Usually year round work is passed to the most senior employees first.

For myself I do oilfield work (winter is busiest; seasonal industry) or go to self employment during my off-season.
So without actual hands-on experience as a laborer or some other role this program a waste of time? I don't mind starting at the bottom I just don't want to waste my time and tens of thousands of dollars. I already have a Civil Engineering Tech diploma so I was just looking to get a degree. I know there are other programs such as Construction Engineering Technology and such that prepare you for similar jobs but are those useless without some sort of construction experience as well?
Member
Feb 16, 2013
489 posts
523 upvotes
Toronto
Michaelp1990 wrote:
Oct 19th, 2017 8:31 pm
So without actual hands-on experience as a laborer or some other role this program a waste of time? I know there are other programs such as Construction Engineering Technology and such that prepare you for similar jobs but are those useless without some sort of construction experience as well?
Not necessarily.
It might be a good foot in the door to get into one of the larger contractors.
But it's also an office job, with office job pay scales.

Trades on the other hand:
A journeyman electrician who did the five year apprenticeship makes 97K a year minimum, for a standard week of 37.5 hours.
Plus 10% vacation pay, 1 dollar an hour RRSP, 5 something an hour pension and some of the best health benefits out there.

If you are specialized in fire alarm and log some double time, you can easily make 160K a year.

The foreman's basic rate is 48 an hour.
Foremen often log double time.
They also sometimes get allowances such as travel, car etc.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 14, 2014
174 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
cowbunpants wrote:
Oct 19th, 2017 8:52 pm
Not necessarily.
It might be a good foot in the door to get into one of the larger contractors.
But it's also an office job, with office job pay scales.

Trades on the other hand:
A journeyman electrician who did the five year apprenticeship makes 97K a year minimum, for a standard week of 37.5 hours.
Plus 10% vacation pay, 1 dollar an hour RRSP, 5 something an hour pension and some of the best health benefits out there.

If you are specialized in fire alarm and log some double time, you can easily make 160K a year.

The foreman's basic rate is 48 an hour.
Foremen often log double time.
They also sometimes get allowances such as travel, car etc.
Do you know anyone in this industry with a B.Tech in CM from George brown college?

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