Parenting & Family

keeping toddlers in the house

  • Last Updated:
  • May 19th, 2017 10:36 am
[OP]
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Apr 22, 2014
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Oshawa, ON

keeping toddlers in the house

Almost 2 year old likes to go on ninja scouting adventures in the middle of the night. Sometimes to our bedroom or bathroom and sometimes downstairs looking for whatever. I'm a little worried he's going to get outside at 3am. He knows how to pull a chair to the door and unlock the deadbolt to get out. It's quite feasible he could get outside without us waking up. Any ideas short of locking him in his bedroom? I don't think that would be safe because who knows what he'd try attempting to get out.
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Jun 3, 2005
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Dildo, NL
My God.

Are you even qualified to be parents??

You're already 2 years in and you're out of ideas. God help you when the real challenges kick in.

Honestly, your predicament, and the fact that your signature was censored for 'inappropriate content' is too much ;).

--------------
okok., I got that out of my system.

Seriously? Sounds like all you just need to do is install a better lock on your main door & Install a full height (non-climbable non-reachable-mechanism/latch) gated door to his bedroom? Do you really have no clue what to do?

What do you do when the child has a full diaper?

#sorrynotsorry
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Oh, and most importantly. In this day and age of viral videos...I suggest you invest in installing a whole home video surveillance system. God knows what 30s high-speed video you will soon be able to release, sensationalizing these "Ninja adventures". All you'd need is some excellent video production and you'll be raking in the referral clicks in no time. Heck, Ellen may even fly you guys out to have the kid do a mock ninja adventure right on her show.

It's all about capitalism!!!
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Install a safety bar type thing right at the top of the door. Or put a deadbolt up higher on the door. You can also install alarms that will go off if the door is opened or a motion activated alarm. Honestly it's not just getting outside, at 2 he could get into lots of trouble in the house. If it's that bad I would get an alarm that goes off if he opens his bedroom door.
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And start telling him he's not allowed to explore the house at night and that there will be consequences if he does. Stop letting your child do whatever he wants and make sure you follow through when you tell him not to do something.
[OP]
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Apr 22, 2014
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Oshawa, ON
bubble.tea wrote:
May 9th, 2017 3:41 pm


Seriously? Sounds like all you just need to do is install a better lock on your main door & Install a full height (non-climbable non-reachable-mechanism/latch) gated door to his bedroom? Do you really have no clue what to do?

#sorrynotsorry
I'm pretty sure locking him in his room is a bad idea. Best case scenario he loses his shit when he can't get out then we wake up and go get him to chill out. Worst case he quietly starts moving furniture around and climbing to try to unlock or tries to head out the window. I would expect that from him.
I want to put better locks on the front/back door, was wondering if anyone had put keypad locks on the interior to keep kids in? He'd eventually figure getting out of the house is hopeless, though I also would expect him to start watching us enter codes more closely, once he runs out of random code attempts. He already tries locks with any keys he can get his hands on. He's not quite at the point of fully understanding a good talking too and being punished for trying novel ideas wouldn't be fair I don't think either. My dad says just sit at his bedroom door all night for several nights until he just doesn't bother trying anymore. He makes a run about 2 or 3 times a night right now.
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[OP]
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Apr 22, 2014
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Momof3cuties wrote:
May 9th, 2017 3:54 pm
If it's that bad I would get an alarm that goes off if he opens his bedroom door.
This sounds like a simple option!
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eldeejay wrote:
May 9th, 2017 3:57 pm
I'm pretty sure locking him in his room is a bad idea. Best case scenario he loses his shit when he can't get out then we wake up and go get him to chill out. Worst case he quietly starts moving furniture around and climbing to try to unlock or tries to head out the window. I would expect that from him.
I want to put better locks on the front/back door, was wondering if anyone had put keypad locks on the interior to keep kids in? He'd eventually figure getting out of the house is hopeless, though I also would expect him to start watching us enter codes more closely, once he runs out of random code attempts. He already tries locks with any keys he can get his hands on. He's not quite at the point of fully understanding a good talking too and being punished for trying novel ideas wouldn't be fair I don't think either. My dad says just sit at his bedroom door all night for several nights until he just doesn't bother trying anymore. He makes a run about 2 or 3 times a night right now.

A two year old can be disciplined. And yes it's better to teach him not to leave his room.

Him losing his crap because he can't get out? Well then yeah then you go in and tell him he can't leave his room and to go back to bed. End of story. Attach his furniture so he can't move it. You are creating your own problems by letting him do what he wants. Be the parent instead of looking for an easy way out.
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Nov 13, 2013
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Threatening a two year old will absolutely not work. They have no impulse control during the day let alone in the middle of the night.
I agree with the idea of an alarm on his door because he can do a lot of damage to himself or property even within the house. Overflow a sink for example. Those hard to open chains or some other kind of deadbolt would also be useful.
[OP]
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Momof3cuties wrote:
May 9th, 2017 3:56 pm
And start telling him he's not allowed to explore the house at night and that there will be consequences if he does. Stop letting your child do whatever he wants and make sure you follow through when you tell him not to do something.
I don't "let" him do anything he shouldn't be doing. He's sleeping on his own now, if he wakes me up, then I can stop him. If he's sneaky enough, I'm sleeping, so there's not a lot I can do. He gets disciplined when he gets caught but I also don't think sleep time is the best time to trigger a tantrum.
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[OP]
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Momof3cuties wrote:
May 9th, 2017 4:02 pm
A two year old can be disciplined. And yes it's better to teach him not to leave his room.

Him losing his crap because he can't get out? Well then yeah then you go in and tell him he can't leave his room and to go back to bed.

And then?
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fogetmylogin wrote:
May 9th, 2017 4:03 pm
Threatening a two year old will absolutely not work. They have no impulse control during the day let alone in the middle of the night.
I agree with the idea of an alarm on his door because he can do a lot of damage to himself or property even within the house. Overflow a sink for example. Those hard to open chains or some other kind of deadbolt would also be useful.
Two year olds can be taught how to behave. When you don't let them get away with something they stop it. It just takes patience and work. And if a kid can figure out how to unlock locks, they can understand consequences. For example my kid was 2 if he threw a toy he lost it first time no excuses. Guess what he didn't throw toys very often.

The people with bratty toddlers who won't listen are the ones who have parents that won't even try. You know the ones with the toddlers running around screaming in the store touching stuff while the parent just keeps saying "don't touch that". Seriously if the kid is doing something they shouldn't pick them up and make them stop.

Same thing here. If your child is getting out of bed and getting into stuff lock his door or set an alarm, and when he freaks out or sets it off tell him NO and put him back to bed.

Can we stop raising spoiled brats and start being parents
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eldeejay wrote:
May 9th, 2017 4:09 pm
And then?
Put him back to bed. Every time he gets out you pick him up and put him right back. It's not rocket science. He will get it eventually.
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You definitely need to enforce our authority somehow. But since it looks like that's not going to happen, get that safety bolt at the top of the door.
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It seems you need to decide who's the parent, and who's the child...

But, the alarm solution seems to be the best. It will (hopefully) mean that if he's out of his room, you're awake as well. You're still going to have to put him back in his bed, which will probably lead to temper tantrums at 3 in the morning...

You may want to consider some form of motion detector instead of just a door alarm. As you said, you can envision him heading out the window. If that's true, and he figures out that the door is a no-go spot now, he may try it anyway. A motion alarm properly aimed away from his crib may help with that.

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