Parenting & Family

keeping toddlers in the house

  • Last Updated:
  • May 19th, 2017 10:36 am
[OP]
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Apr 22, 2014
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Momof3cuties wrote:
May 9th, 2017 4:12 pm
Put him back to bed. Every time he gets out you pick him up and put him right back. It's not rocket science. He will get it eventually.
This is current practice. To a T. Except if don't know he's out of bed because he's a sneaky ninja there's not a lot I can do
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Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
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Toronto
LOL, if you can't control your kid at 2, you're in for a whole world of hurt when he's older or a teen.

If he's sleep walking or doing things unconsciously, then ya, get the safety gear out.

Also ask yourself why is your kid waking up in the middle of the night? Young kids usually needs a tons of sleep hours.

If your really paranoid, you can put bells and wind chimes on his bedroom door.
Sr. Member
Mar 24, 2015
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Ottawa, ON
We have something like this on the doors http://www.toysrus.com/buy/door-window- ... 65-3502254
Also because we have an alarm system, everytime the doors open, there's a chime.
Close his bedroom door. If you hear him open the door at 3am, put him back to bed. My 2 yr old used to wake up between 3am and 4am almost everyday, We told him it's not wake up time yet and I would be sitting on his bed making sure he's back to sleep. Now he wakes up at 5am.
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Sometimes I'm thankful for an old house with squeaky doors, usually heard them get up in the night! First off, I'd never lock him in his room - if there's a fire, and you can't get to him, he'd never be able to get out on his own. I like the chime idea. You can probably find other ideas here: http://www.safetysuperstore.ca

The other thing is the schedule - are you putting him to bed too early or too late? What's the process of getting him to sleep? Can he fall asleep on his own? If he doesn't fall asleep on his own (ie. rocking him or nursing him to sleep) then he doesn't know how to go to sleep on his own yet, so if he wakes up, he can't self-soothe.
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Jan 2, 2015
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Why is the toddler ting up in the middle of the night? I am sorry I don't understand a sneaky two year old ninja. Sneaky and ninja implies intent and that he knows he is not supposed to be doing something but yet tries to be sneaky and do it. 2 years are not that quiet trying to move furniture unless he is trying to do something he know is wrong. Toddlers who are curious who truly don't what they are doing is wrong, isn't being sneaky. If he he is trying to be sneaky, then he can be disciplined. If it's because they are sleepwalking or something, that totally different way to handle it.

First, you need to get a proper lock on the window, or one of those screw in latches that prevents a window from opening more than a small amount. Thanks is a safety issue, kids fallening out of windows actually quite common and there have been deaths.
Second, you need to teach you child what is safe or not. If you don't think you can, the child child proof.

You can try those door knob cover things, but I found my children figured them out before two. I agree an alarm/motion sensor is a good idea, except it is a little alarming, literally in the middle of the night, I would think it could impact everyone including the toddler getting back to sleep.

When my toddler decided to explore in the middle of the night, we locked her door from the outside. I don't know why you think that is wrong. She was safe on her room, and it set the limits. We also had a monitor we could check on her.

I would try to figure why you toddler is coming out though.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
[OP]
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Apr 22, 2014
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Thanks for everyone that offered real solutions to the problem I laid out and the rest of you are welcome for being provided a place to vent your projections and insecurities about child discipline and for not being reported as off topic. I'm getting an alarm for his door. That will likely solve the problem.
To anyone that thinks locking the door is a good idea, give your head a shake, or call the fire department and see what they say.
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^ Sadly, you don't even realize parents like you are the problem with kids today.

People in this thread have echoed my comments, pleased to hear. I was wondering if I'd get reported for being *mean*.

Who's parenting who, honestly op.

"My 2 year old is dictating our lifestyle, what do I do?" lol
eldeejay wrote:
May 10th, 2017 7:47 am
Thanksreported as off topic...
You should be reported to the Certified Parenting Association...oh wait - there is none...

Moving on...
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I'm probably going to get a lot of lecturing on this, but I'm not sure I understand what the issue is with locking the door. Isn't the risk equivalent to leaving your child in a crib?
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Mikaelali wrote:
May 10th, 2017 8:53 am
... what the issue is with locking the door. Isn't the risk equivalent to leaving your child in a crib?
No it's different.

Crib is an open but restricted space.

Closing or locking the door is a very scary concept for me, because of the horror stories of fires starting (electrical devices/misc), health emergencies occuring with the child - while the parents can't hear or smell anything till it is wayyyyyyyyyy too late.

That's why I said, install a proper unopenable gate. It secures the entire room, but allows smells & sounds to travel just like an open door.

No I don't trust monitors the same way. Can a monitor transmit smells?
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GPS tracker chip...you can get one at the Vet, or you can buy a kit at the car dealership...but not sure how you can install it yourself.
[OP]
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bubble.tea wrote:
May 10th, 2017 8:16 am
^ Sadly, you don't even realize parents like you are the problem with kids today.

People in this thread have echoed my comments, pleased to hear. I was wondering if I'd get reported for being *mean*.

Who's parenting who, honestly op.

"My 2 year old is dictating our lifestyle, what do I do?" lol


You should be reported to the Certified Parenting Association...oh wait - there is none...

Moving on...
A toddler being curious and trying to avoid trouble is a sign of bad parenting?
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Nov 13, 2013
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Momof3cuties wrote:
May 9th, 2017 4:10 pm
Two year olds can be taught how to behave. When you don't let them get away with something they stop it. It just takes patience and work. And if a kid can figure out how to unlock locks, they can understand consequences. For example my kid was 2 if he threw a toy he lost it first time no excuses. Guess what he didn't throw toys very often.

The people with bratty toddlers who won't listen are the ones who have parents that won't even try. You know the ones with the toddlers running around screaming in the store touching stuff while the parent just keeps saying "don't touch that". Seriously if the kid is doing something they shouldn't pick them up and make them stop.

Same thing here. If your child is getting out of bed and getting into stuff lock his door or set an alarm, and when he freaks out or sets it off tell him NO and put him back to bed.

Can we stop raising spoiled brats and start being parents
You certainly need set boundaries but the idea of this is so when they are 4 they will behave. What you can't do is bet their life on it at age 2 and they will have lapses at two no matter what. We have the same rule for throwing or not putting away toys. Three year old still does it sometimes. Do I give in when she cries no but I would't give her something dangerous to herself or others and say well she should know the rules. My three year old knows not to run away from me because of strict enforcement of this rule and hasn't done it for a long time. Doesn't mean I trust her next to a busy road though. Exiting the house is potentially life threatening so something further is needed.
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Jan 16, 2007
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Maybe this is off topic, but I don't not do the locked door for my kids/dog because it forces my will on my kid/pet. Forcing my will on them does not teach self control / discipline to kid/dog. It's just an act of cruelty.
My dog does not go up the stairs to the second floor in my house even though there is no gate blocking his way, he just knows the rules of the house. My kid is a different matter now that she's a teen and have started pushing boundaries.
I'd be dead by now if my kid started pushing boundaries at 2.
That's basically it.
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NubNub wrote:
May 10th, 2017 4:22 pm
...I'd be dead by now if my kid started pushing boundaries at 2.
That's basically it.
This made me get a good solid chuckle. I needed it. About to call it a day. Cheers.NubNub!
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bubble.tea wrote:
May 10th, 2017 9:01 am
No it's different.

Crib is an open but restricted space.

Closing or locking the door is a very scary concept for me, because of the horror stories of fires starting (electrical devices/misc), health emergencies occuring with the child - while the parents can't hear or smell anything till it is wayyyyyyyyyy too late.

That's why I said, install a proper unopenable gate. It secures the entire room, but allows smells & sounds to travel just like an open door.

No I don't trust monitors the same way. Can a monitor transmit smells?
I just picked this post to reply, but this is for those who are concerned from a fire safety stand point of locking doors. Assuming a baby/toddler cannot climb out of their crib, the a locked room and crib are in fact the same in case of a fire both being spaces that they cannot get out of in the event of a fire, with the room being a larger restricted space. Though it is true on the toddler could get themselves out of the room in an event of a fire, there are probably hirer risks associated with a young toddler that explores the house in the middle of night. if a fire where to break out during the night and th child is wandering, there is a higher chance that you would not find them in time, vs grabbing them from their bedroom.

In fact, it's is a safest for one to sleep with the doors of your bedroom closed, as it's usually the smoke that kills people in their sleep, which is quite silent. Hence why smoke alarms are so important. The unopenable gate is actually less safe than a closed door because if the fire starts outside of the child's room, they will be impacted more quickly than if their door was closed. Also, the risk of a fire starting in a toddlers room is less likely than other parts of the house such as the kitchen or garage. Baby rooms tend to be less cluttered and more child proofed than most others. There is less likely a chance that a toddler room that has heat sources, chemicals, frayed cords, smokers, each which are a lot of the risk triggers. The exception of a space heater, which is a seperate converstion.

BTW I have spoken to fire officials about this as a general inquiry. So no need to give my head a shake.

The purpose of my post was just present the facts or risk assessments to educate.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.

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