Expired Hot Deals

[Newegg] kill-a-watt $16.99

  • Last Updated:
  • May 5th, 2010 3:12 pm
Member
User avatar
Feb 7, 2006
333 posts
52 upvotes
Montreal

[Newegg] kill-a-watt $16.99

Kill-a-watt measures how much electricity a plug in appliance has consumed. Been waiting for newegg.ca ($23+$10s/h) to come down in price, then saw it in Meritline, $16.99 free ship, that hits the sweet spot :D
Coupon Code :MLC203005050320NL1
http://www.meritline.com/p3-internation ... 22980.aspx
Image
**Sorry, when checkout, said us ONLY!
27 replies
Jr. Member
User avatar
Nov 26, 2003
103 posts
Vancouver
Does not ship outside US.
Newbie
Sep 25, 2008
44 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto
Try some of these websites. Some of them are willing to ship to Canada.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jul 8, 2009
7159 posts
785 upvotes
i wanted to buy one of these a while back i think CT had them for 20 but was OOS when i got there
Member
Apr 15, 2007
382 posts
43 upvotes
Acton, Ontario
I bought mine from Lee Valley for around $20. It's hard to find on their website, but if you have a store nearby just go in and ask for a Kill A Watt.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Jul 31, 2002
124 posts
24 upvotes
Richmond
Where were you yesterday.. I bought one yesterday for $20.89! Ouch
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 12, 2006
3713 posts
43 upvotes
Aske001 wrote:
May 3rd, 2010 2:27 pm
This unit at Canadian Tire is equally good: http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/3 ... ?locale=en

It normally sells for $25, but CT has it on sale a couple of times a year for < $20 if you can wait.
correct. I bought one from CT about a year ago for $20.
Ban Steve Downie from NHL
Self Proclaimed PYwner Late Miss. Masco:My Gramma is gooder than your typos Says GrammerNazi.
smitty9999 on saving power: nooB Powers on the PC just to post stfu.
board123:when challenged runs away as fast as it can, hide behind mommy.
Newbie
Sep 11, 2007
33 posts
2 upvotes
don't order desert when u eat out and u saved the 4$
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
2476 posts
343 upvotes
Ottawa
pmeth wrote:
May 3rd, 2010 2:56 pm
I bought mine from Lee Valley for around $20. It's hard to find on their website, but if you have a store nearby just go in and ask for a Kill A Watt.
Type lee valley kill a watt into Google and hit "Feeling Lucky". It doesn't get much easier than that :razz:

Anyway, they're OOS now.

I have both the K-A-W and the CT clone. The readings from the K-A-W are far more stable but the averaged results are close.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 22, 2004
1706 posts
376 upvotes
Ottawa
I've got the UPM version from Canadian Tire but have noticed that to properly calculate your actual consumption rates it is extremely important to manually write down the time/date that you install the unit in-line. That's because things like fridges, freezers, water coolers, etc cycle on and off and frequently don't draw any measureable power.

The UPM device will calculate the consumption rate and cost (presuming you input the rate to the device - $.15 kwh with Ontario One) but that's based upon actual running time. In a 24 hour period my freezer runs only 6 hours so to accurately project the monthly cost, one must carefully record the real metered time. If you're not using a straight forward 24 hour measured cycle, the math gets complicated.

Does anyone know if the "Kill-a-Watt" unit does this calculation automatically within the unit based upon the time it has been placed in-line? Does this unit have an on-off switch to save the batteries since the UPM doesn't and when not in use just sits there draining down the pair of "watch batteries".
Jr. Member
Mar 13, 2003
133 posts
Koslov wrote:
May 3rd, 2010 5:31 pm
A true RFDer never eats at a restaurant unless the food is either free or he has coupons.
I usually eat from the dumpster - saves a lot of $$$ and sometimes I find pets in there - which I resell.
DEAL MAKER, HEART BREAKER
Deal Addict
May 2, 2004
2434 posts
69 upvotes
No batteries in kilowatt, so no memeory when unplugged.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 21, 2006
5148 posts
97 upvotes
pauldryan wrote:
May 4th, 2010 7:23 am
I've got the UPM version from Canadian Tire but have noticed that to properly calculate your actual consumption rates it is extremely important to manually write down the time/date that you install the unit in-line. That's because things like fridges, freezers, water coolers, etc cycle on and off and frequently don't draw any measureable power.

The UPM device will calculate the consumption rate and cost (presuming you input the rate to the device - $.15 kwh with Ontario One) but that's based upon actual running time. In a 24 hour period my freezer runs only 6 hours so to accurately project the monthly cost, one must carefully record the real metered time. If you're not using a straight forward 24 hour measured cycle, the math gets complicated.

Does anyone know if the "Kill-a-Watt" unit does this calculation automatically within the unit based upon the time it has been placed in-line? Does this unit have an on-off switch to save the batteries since the UPM doesn't and when not in use just sits there draining down the pair of "watch batteries".
The UPM unit does record both the amount of time it has been on and the amount of power consumed. It will convert that to $ if you enter a rate. Just leave it on long enough to average out for appliances that cycle on/off. What more do you need?

The UPM unit does not have an on/off switch, but it hardly uses any battery power when it's not in use. I'm still using the original button batteries, but I take them out when not in use (and yes, it's annoyingly difficult to open the poorly designed battery compartment!). Replacement batteries cost about 20 cents at the $ store, so not a big deal.

If you are really interested in monitoring overall power consumption and $ cost accurately for your home, what you may want is the Black & Decker wireless power monitor (http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/3 ... ?locale=en). It's on sale at Superstore at the moment for $60. You need access to your electric meter to install it, and the resolution is poor for individual appliances at low power consumption, but it's very accurate at showing overall power consumption. You can enter more complex tiered rates, and it will estimate your monthly cost.
× < >

Top