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Member
Oct 2, 2006
206 posts
29 upvotes
Abbotsford
krs wrote:
Dec 13th, 2015 10:26 am
One is dimmable the other one not.
Dimmable LED bulbs need more electronic circuitry to drive the LED so they are more expensive and less efficient than non-dimmable LED bulbs.
How did I miss that. Interesting though that the dimmable are the cheaper ones by a fairly significant margin.
Deal Addict
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Mar 28, 2005
3105 posts
184 upvotes
Ontario / Quebec
ryanthekiwi wrote:
Dec 14th, 2015 12:05 am
Interesting though that the dimmable are the cheaper ones by a fairly significant margin.
Price of LED bulbs are all over the map.
I bought a batch of Cree A19 types for $1.97 each a few months ago simply because Cree was introducing the "next generation bulbs" and the retailer wanted to clear his shelves.
Dimmebale LED bulbs don't work that well, at least the ones I tried. They only dim to about half intensity and for some you need to buy a special "LED" dimmer.
Buying lightbulbs has suddenly become more complex than just picking the wattage and the right base.
Newbie
Dec 17, 2015
1 posts
Toronto, ON
A led bulb is available from 9 w to 60w. The 9 w led will offer 800 lm and incandescent 60 w will offer 500 lm lumes respectively. The amount of light in a room will help you create suitable ambiance. If you want to dim light you better choose 9 w bulb and for the brighter ones , 60 w would be the perfect choice.
Deal Addict
May 26, 2011
1792 posts
462 upvotes
Vancouver
ryanthekiwi wrote:
Dec 14th, 2015 12:05 am
How did I miss that. Interesting though that the dimmable are the cheaper ones by a fairly significant margin.
Perhaps cheaper in terms of initial purchase price, but they are not really cheaper, when you look at total cost of ownership. Considering that the 10.5W is rated for 25,000 hours and the 8.5W is rated for 10,950 hours, the 10.5W will cost $16.75 over 10,000 hours, and the 8.5W will cost $16.78 over 10,000 hours.

This is based on purchase prices at my Home Depot, $6.97 for the 10.5W and $5.99 for the 8.5W, and electric rates of $0.133/kWh.
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
1037 posts
267 upvotes
For anyone that cares, found these at Dollarama in Calgary and bought a bunch to replace all my lights in the basement (only place with these types), $3 a pop, got 14 bulbs for $42. Cut my power usage from 600W to 72W!

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[OP]
Deal Expert
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Jan 27, 2004
36814 posts
2606 upvotes
Toronto
eblend wrote:
Dec 31st, 2015 1:01 pm
For anyone that cares, found these at Dollarama in Calgary and bought a bunch to replace all my lights in the basement (only place with these types), $3 a pop, got 14 bulbs for $42. Cut my power usage from 600W to 72W!

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LED lighting as come a long way since I started this thread back in 2007.
They now sell LED lighting everywhere. ITs main stream. They even have it at discount dollar stores.
My first LED light bulb was this awkward thing that turned to a blueish hue after a while. It was more like a night light in power... It cost $13 from deal extreme. It seemed like a niche enthusiast type thing back then.

Now they got these things full powered and cheap! Amazing.
Deal Addict
Feb 18, 2016
1268 posts
344 upvotes
UrbanPoet wrote:
Feb 24th, 2016 7:13 pm
LED lighting as come a long way since I started this thread back in 2007.
They now sell LED lighting everywhere. ITs main stream. They even have it at discount dollar stores.
My first LED light bulb was this awkward thing that turned to a blueish hue after a while. It was more like a night light in power... It cost $13 from deal extreme. It seemed like a niche enthusiast type thing back then.

Now they got these things full powered and cheap! Amazing.
I've been on the fence about this for a while. I have a few areas with GU10 halogen that I would switch out but I find that I barely use those areas, and also those areas already have dimmers, so there is extra cost in getting LED-compatible dimmers, plus the waste of what to do with the old ones. The last room that got a dimmer, happened after LEDs started to become mainstream so when I got that dimmer I got the LED compatible one to sort of "future proof" that room. I relocated it to the room that gets the most use and changed the halogens to dimmable LEDs from IKEA. 2700K, I like it. It's true that it doesn't dim as low as halogen but I've already gotten used to it. Also changed the bulbs in the bedside tables with the regular E26 non-dimmable LED bulb from IKEA (2-pack).

Update: Aside from LEDARE selection of LED bulbs at IKEA, there is also RYET which are non-dimmable, sold in 2-packs, good deal on these
Sr. Member
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Jul 11, 2011
864 posts
500 upvotes
Ontario
I'm looking at a bathroom vanity light that calls for : 4 x G9 type light bulb-25W (not included)

What kind of 'brightness' could I expect from that?? My original fixture was a standard 3 x 60w and I found it to be too 'dim' for the size of the bathroom -- room is not large but there is no natural light.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2006
7919 posts
1974 upvotes
Brampton
UrbanPoet wrote:
Feb 24th, 2016 7:13 pm
LED lighting as come a long way since I started this thread back in 2007.
They now sell LED lighting everywhere. ITs main stream. They even have it at discount dollar stores.
My first LED light bulb was this awkward thing that turned to a blueish hue after a while. It was more like a night light in power... It cost $13 from deal extreme. It seemed like a niche enthusiast type thing back then.

Now they got these things full powered and cheap! Amazing.
Really is amazing how far they've come in 10 years. Couldn't imagine using anything but LEDs these days.
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User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
1691 posts
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Windsor
hebsie wrote:
Aug 10th, 2017 10:52 am
I'm looking at a bathroom vanity light that calls for : 4 x G9 type light bulb-25W (not included)

What kind of 'brightness' could I expect from that?? My original fixture was a standard 3 x 60w and I found it to be too 'dim' for the size of the bathroom -- room is not large but there is no natural light.
3 x 60 = 180w of light. 4 x 25 = 100w of light. Your old vanity will be brighter, assuming you're using max-rated incandescent bulbs in both.

However, if you put 60w equivalent G9 LEDs (generally spendy) in place of those 25w "normal" bulbs (they would only be drawing somewhere around 6w, so well within the fixture's design spec), it would be brighter than your old setup. This assumes the LEDs won't be enclosed though; not sure if there are G9 LEDs that can do enclosed fixtures @ that brightness.

OTOH, you could put 3x 100w LEDs (spendy, but not as bad as the G9s) into your current fixture (they'll only be drawing around 16w, so well within the design spec of your old fixture), and it'd be much brighter than your new fixture, regardless of which bulbs are in it.
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.

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