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  • Mar 24th, 2010 10:39 pm
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Deal Guru
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Dec 26, 2005
13978 posts
933 upvotes
Thornhill
Briefly checked the website but didn't see any prices... what are their prices like?

Can't you just get a normal potlight installer to install, then use the LED lights? I'm guessing LED potlights might be cheaper to install since you probably don't need to deal with all that heat.

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Member
Mar 17, 2008
477 posts
2 upvotes
I'm looking for a warm or 'standard' colour temperature in recessed LED lights + cans. Can lights like these be purchased at a local RONA or HD?
Newbie
Jan 26, 2009
27 posts
Halifax
HD has Phillips brand LED's in various temperatures and bases. You can use them in traditional cans.

Cost is around $30 per bulb. I have one outside and its awesome. Doesnt attract insects so no more ugly yellow bulbs.

Cold doesnt effect it.

Going on a year now of dusk to dawn use, no issues. Cost is too great to do the whole house right now, and this was bought as a trial to test out the technology, but id have no issues recommending them. Especially for lights that stay on for long periods, like exterior lighting.
Deal Expert
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Apr 21, 2004
32621 posts
5531 upvotes
scooby074 wrote:
Feb 6th, 2010 12:39 am
HD has Phillips brand LED's in various temperatures and bases. You can use them in traditional cans.

Cost is around $30 per bulb. I have one outside and its awesome. Doesnt attract insects so no more ugly yellow bulbs.

Cold doesnt effect it.

Going on a year now of dusk to dawn use, no issues. Cost is too great to do the whole house right now, and this was bought as a trial to test out the technology, but id have no issues recommending them. Especially for lights that stay on for long periods, like exterior lighting.
Do these LED bulbs fit into regular potlight recesses? I guess because they draw less power, any existing electrical plans will be more than enough to handle these. Haven't reached that stage where we have to decide on the number of potlights but these LED lights do seem to make sense.

Thanks
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Sr. Member
Jan 17, 2008
994 posts
77 upvotes
Costco has some LED lights on sale this week.
I didn't catch the size or price but might be worthwhile checking outl.
Member
Apr 29, 2007
206 posts
1 upvote
The bulbs come in different bases.
For my house, the potlights have MR16 bases.
I bought a 1W single-LED bulb online a couple of years ago for $20
to evaluate the technology. It was way too dim
compared to the standard 50W halogen.

I bought a 5W 4-LED bulb online last month for $10 to evaluate
the technology. I would say it is close to what a 25W Halogen
would be like. The price and supposed long life makes this interesting
enough for me to consider for one of my hallways (3 potlights).
I am still tentative for room lighting because these LED bulbs are
still an infant market. I find that the colour temperature spec, the
beam spread (spot or wide angle etc) spec are all unreliable.

You are pretty well stuck buying one to check.

I can't afford $30 light bulbs. High power LEDs have a long life (>15 yrs)
if they are kept cool. With heat (such as in a recessed can), that can drop dramatically. The LED in MR16 base runs uncomfortably hot to the touch
so I am guessing it is at least 90+ Celsius. That's pretty hot to run
a semiconductor.
Deal Addict
Aug 31, 2006
2295 posts
185 upvotes
Haven't called to ask how much it costs but this is a local/Cdn alternative for MR16 bulbs:

http://www.redflagdeals.com/forums/led- ... st10387095
sunjwd wrote:
Feb 26th, 2010 4:09 pm
The bulbs come in different bases.
For my house, the potlights have MR16 bases.
I bought a 1W single-LED bulb online a couple of years ago for $20
to evaluate the technology. It was way too dim
compared to the standard 50W halogen.

I bought a 5W 4-LED bulb online last month for $10 to evaluate
the technology. I would say it is close to what a 25W Halogen
would be like. The price and supposed long life makes this interesting
enough for me to consider for one of my hallways (3 potlights).
I am still tentative for room lighting because these LED bulbs are
still an infant market. I find that the colour temperature spec, the
beam spread (spot or wide angle etc) spec are all unreliable.

You are pretty well stuck buying one to check.

I can't afford $30 light bulbs. High power LEDs have a long life (>15 yrs)
if they are kept cool. With heat (such as in a recessed can), that can drop dramatically. The LED in MR16 base runs uncomfortably hot to the touch
so I am guessing it is at least 90+ Celsius. That's pretty hot to run
a semiconductor.
Member
Apr 29, 2007
206 posts
1 upvote
mangoman wrote:
Feb 26th, 2010 4:18 pm
Haven't called to ask how much it costs but this is a local/Cdn alternative for MR16 bulbs:
I took a quick look. The Buy and Try program gives you "$10 off" regular
prices, though they don't say what are regular prices.
Member
Oct 25, 2008
304 posts
26 upvotes
Montreal
scooby074 wrote:
Feb 6th, 2010 12:39 am
HD has Phillips brand LED's in various temperatures and bases. You can use them in traditional cans.

Cost is around $30 per bulb. I have one outside and its awesome. Doesnt attract insects so no more ugly yellow bulbs.

Cold doesnt effect it.

Going on a year now of dusk to dawn use, no issues. Cost is too great to do the whole house right now, and this was bought as a trial to test out the technology, but id have no issues recommending them. Especially for lights that stay on for long periods, like exterior lighting.
Can you put it on a dimmer - or is it just on or off?
Member
Apr 29, 2007
206 posts
1 upvote
Fr0sty wrote:
Feb 28th, 2010 7:55 pm
Can you put it on a dimmer - or is it just on or off?
The new super bright LEDs (look for names like Cree, Luxeon, etc)
used in the good bulbs need a constant current to run. You cannot
dim them with normal dimmers. The spec on what little paperwork
they come with says the input voltage can be anything within a range
(eg: 85-260V) for the same output brightness.
(The LEDs I am talking about are 1-4 LEDs in a light bulb. Some
bulbs have dozens of old-school LEDs in one bulb. To me the second
type isn't really practical nor cost effective.)
Newbie
Jan 26, 2009
27 posts
Halifax
Fr0sty wrote:
Feb 28th, 2010 7:55 pm
Can you put it on a dimmer - or is it just on or off?
This light is just off and on so i dont know, but i doubt it can be dimmed.

Its still working well. im pretty happy with it
Sr. Member
Dec 5, 2007
543 posts
1 upvote
NB
sunjwd wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2010 2:52 pm
The new super bright LEDs (look for names like Cree, Luxeon, etc)
used in the good bulbs need a constant current to run. You cannot
dim them with normal dimmers. The spec on what little paperwork
they come with says the input voltage can be anything within a range
(eg: 85-260V) for the same output brightness.
(The LEDs I am talking about are 1-4 LEDs in a light bulb. Some
bulbs have dozens of old-school LEDs in one bulb. To me the second
type isn't really practical nor cost effective.)
X2

Not all LEDs are created equal.


There are 2 main categories of LEDs

Generic LEDs which are used in basic items like flashlights, cheaper LED bulbs, electronics, toys, etc
Image

High output LEDs used in high end lighting (flashlights, bulbs, etc)

Luxeon
Image

Cree
Image

Luxeon, Cree's and other high output LEDs are usually distinguishable by the large yellow center (light emitting diode, which is the actual source of the LED's light) as well as heavier duty heatsinks (more light produced = more heat produced). You can expect them to cost more but you should be far more pleased with the light output from this type of LED versus the generic types.
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