Computers & Electronics

LG G Pad III Owners Thread

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  • Aug 31st, 2018 3:57 pm
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Tichi wrote:
May 17th, 2017 8:26 am
Wow. What a bummer. Okay, no root for this tabby, then! ;)

My netflix apps seem to work still on both rooted and non-rooted as of today... version 4.x I think... So, it is not recommended to update netflix on the rotted devices anymore, or therr is a workaround?
It is a cat and mouse game. The netflix cat hasn't caught up to you yet, count on being caught. Right now, netflix has just started playing the game. All they have done so far is to ask google to block access to the app on play store for devices with unlocked bootloaders. You can do offline install as a workaround because netflix has not implemented any blocks in their app. Some apps are more sophisticated, they look for bootloader unlock status. Expect netflix to step up their game in that direction. I am sure the xda folks are working on ways to mask bootloader unlock status from certain apps. This masking has been done quite successfully for supersu status. Read up on magisk and dm-verity in your spare time.
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Tichi wrote:
May 17th, 2017 8:26 am
workaround?
Sideload! Google is your frenemy (in this case.)

But the message is clear: Google (Android) doesn't want people to routinely root their devices.

One more reason to make rooting as hard as possible is that rooted devices are easier for bad people to hack into. The current WannaCry ransomware hack is another warning call that we need to make devices inherently more secure.
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will888 wrote:
May 17th, 2017 8:41 am

It is a cat and mouse game. The netflix cat hasn't caught up to you yet, count on being caught. Right now, netflix has just started playing the game. All they have done so far is to ask google to block access to the app on play store for devices with unlocked bootloaders. You can do offline install as a workaround because netflix has not implemented any blocks in their app. Some apps are more sophisticated, they look for bootloader unlock status. Expect netflix to step up their game in that direction. I am sure the xda folks are working on ways to mask bootloader unlock status from certain apps. This masking has been done quite successfully for supersu status. Read up on magisk and dm-verity in your spare time.
bylo wrote:
May 17th, 2017 8:46 am
Sideload! Google is your frenemy (in this case.)

But the message is clear: Google (Android) doesn't want people to routinely root their devices.

One more reason to make rooting as hard as possible is that rooted devices are easier for bad people to hack into. The current WannaCry ransomware hack is another warning call that we need to make devices inherently more secure.


Thank you folks!
What a devious netflix! Just checked, netflix app indeed disappeared on Google Play for all my rooted devices,
while it is still there as version 5 for the non-rooted ones!

So, let us say l if one gets apk of the version 5 somewhere, one can still install it and use it successfully?
Where to get it? fdroid or something like that?

P.S. Or I can download it on non-rooted LG tablet, save apk, and install on the rooted devices. Here is a good use of this LG tabby :)
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Tichi wrote:
May 17th, 2017 9:30 am
Thank you folks!
What a devious netflix! Just checked, netflix app indeed disappeared on Google Play for all my rooted devices,
while it is still there as version 5 for the non-rooted ones!

So, let us say l if one gets apk of the version 5 somewhere, one can still install it and use it successfully?
Where to get it? fdroid or something like that?

P.S. Or I can download it on non-rooted LG tablet, save apk, and install on the rooted devices. Here is a good use of this LG tabby :)
As I said, Google is both your friend (to find e.g https://www.apkmirror.com/?post_type=ap ... &s=netflix) and your enemy (Play Store.)

Of course even so it's not hard for an app to determine if it's running on a rooted device and if so, refuse to run. Hence the cat-and-mouse/whach-a-mole analogies.
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bylo wrote:
May 17th, 2017 9:38 am
As I said, Google is both your friend (to find e.g https://www.apkmirror.com/?post_type=ap ... &s=netflix) and your enemy (Play Store.)

Of course even so it's not hard for an app to determine if it's running on a rooted device and if so, refuse to run. Hence the cat-and-mouse/whach-a-mole analogies.
thank you, apkmirror is useful .. did not know about it..

Yeah, more and more apps are trying to "whack" my rooted phone/tablet.. banking apps are still functioning, but with annoying warnings..
I'm sensing they will refuse to function too, after another update. And with banking apps you cannot run older versions - they simply refuse to run!

Is rooting doomed?
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Tichi wrote:
May 17th, 2017 9:50 am
thank you, apkmirror is useful .. did not know about it..

Yeah, more and more apps are trying to "whack" my rooted phone/tablet.. banking apps are still functioning, but with annoying warnings..
I'm sensing they will refuse to function too, after another update. And with banking apps you cannot run older versions - they simply refuse to run!

Is rooting doomed?
Enjoy while it lasts. Companies like netflix haven't really even started to play hard ball. It takes very little for them to prevent stale apps from being used and working with dm-verity checks to block the app from running. Maybe it is best that you keep one or two unsullied devices kicking around for watching netflix and doing banking. Personally, I will likely never bank with my phone or watch thumbnail movies, so no real lost. Keeping my flashlight app under lock and key is far more critical.
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Ultimately, I think people want to root their phones because it enables functionality that they don't have access to.

For me, I root because I can make use of Titanium Backup, ad-blockers and the Xposed modules.

I also like to have an unlocked bootloader so that I can install custom ROMs, such as Cyanogenmod/Lineage OS that has allowed my older devices to get recent updates long after their manufacturers stopping OS updates for them.

People used to jailbreak Apple iOS devices too. But over time, Apple has added the functionality into iOS, and today, there is less emphasis on jailbreaking that before.

If rooting is to disappear, then Android needs to allow users to get the functionality they want without needing to root. Not all rooting is done to enable illegal downloads or hacking; otherwise there will always be people who want it.
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kitty wrote:
May 17th, 2017 3:21 pm
Ultimately, I think people want to root their phones because it enables functionality that they don't have access to.

For me, I root because I can make use of Titanium Backup, ad-blockers and the Xposed modules.

I also like to have an unlocked bootloader so that I can install custom ROMs, such as Cyanogenmod/Lineage OS that has allowed my older devices to get recent updates long after their manufacturers stopping OS updates for them.

People used to jailbreak Apple iOS devices too. But over time, Apple has added the functionality into iOS, and today, there is less emphasis on jailbreaking that before.

If rooting is to disappear, then Android needs to allow users to get the functionality they want without needing to root. Not all rooting is done to enable illegal downloads or hacking; otherwise there will always be people who want it.
Herein lies the problem. In order to avoid bootloader unlocking, all the third party roms would have to go to google or whoever the gatekeeper is for digital signing.
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will888 wrote:
May 17th, 2017 3:01 pm
Enjoy while it lasts. Companies like netflix haven't really even started to play hard ball. It takes very little for them to prevent stale apps from being used and working with dm-verity checks to block the app from running. Maybe it is best that you keep one or two unsullied devices kicking around for watching netflix and doing banking. Personally, I will likely never bank with my phone or watch thumbnail movies, so no real lost. Keeping my flashlight app under lock and key is far more critical.
kitty wrote:
May 17th, 2017 3:21 pm
Ultimately, I think people want to root their phones because it enables functionality that they don't have access to.

For me, I root because I can make use of Titanium Backup, ad-blockers and the Xposed modules.

I also like to have an unlocked bootloader so that I can install custom ROMs, such as Cyanogenmod/Lineage OS that has allowed my older devices to get recent updates long after their manufacturers stopping OS updates for them.

People used to jailbreak Apple iOS devices too. But over time, Apple has added the functionality into iOS, and today, there is less emphasis on jailbreaking that before.

If rooting is to disappear, then Android needs to allow users to get the functionality they want without needing to root. Not all rooting is done to enable illegal downloads or hacking; otherwise there will always be people who want it.
This is all extremely sad, because from the unix/linux standpoint rooting is just enabling you to have superuser password/rights, is not it?

I mean who would want a unix/linux without a superuser access? Just ridiculous..

Maybe android can elaborate a a civil way to obtain a superuser access to the operating system for those users who desire it, without "jailbreaking" and such other criminal activities? :)
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Tichi wrote:
May 17th, 2017 5:10 pm
This is all extremely sad, because from the unix/linux standpoint rooting is just enabling you to have superuser password/rights, is not it?

I mean who would want a unix/linux without a superuser access? Just ridiculous..

Maybe android can elaborate a a civil way to obtain a superuser access to the operating system for those users who desire it, without "jailbreaking" and such other criminal activities? :)
Yes it is. I don't mind if they allowed terminal sessions with sudo as a partial substitute to bootloader unlock and root.
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Tichi wrote:
May 17th, 2017 5:10 pm
I mean who would want a unix/linux without a superuser access? Just ridiculous..
But this is not unix/linux :) it's Android running on your 8 yrs old child tablet :) Root (su) is a support nightmare for any company trying to go from niche to mainstream.
With that said, companies should be more flexible when it comes rooting, exchanging bootloader unlock for warranty rights (Motorola /Huawei model) should be the way to go.
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aasoror wrote:
May 17th, 2017 8:29 pm
But this is not unix/linux :) it's Android running on your 8 yrs old child tablet :) Root (su) is a support nightmare for any company trying to go from niche to mainstream.
With that said, companies should be more flexible when it comes rooting, exchanging bootloader unlock for warranty rights (Motorola /Huawei model) should be the way to go.
I agree. Companies should allow me to install custom rom, etc. knowing all the risk associated with going that route. This is why I like buying phones with easy to unlock bootloader. Sadly, I think those who rely on oem software updates are more vulnerable for two reasons, 1. sparse updates, 2. those who tinker with the os are a little more savvy with handling software issues.

While we are still hovering around the security discussion, try installing this vulnerability test suite to see how secure the 2 year old rom is.

https://www.nowsecure.com/blog/2015/11/ ... -now-what/
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May 15, 2017
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Still looking to see if anyone who has bought this tablet second hand has had any issues dealing with lg for warranty?

I'm aware this isn't a top end device so I do expect a chance of something going wrong in warranty. Hopefully not but like the peace of mind knowing I atleast have it

A guy selling a brand new one in box with a brand new case for it for $185. A good deal, except not so much if lg is just going to turn their back on the warranty for not being the original owner
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Hemi558 wrote:
May 18th, 2017 9:31 am
Still looking to see if anyone who has bought this tablet second hand has had any issues dealing with lg for warranty?
Perhaps that's an indication of the relative number of these tablets that need warranty service in the first place ;)
A guy selling a brand new one in box with a brand new case for it for $185. A good deal, except not so much if lg is just going to turn their back on the warranty for not being the original owner
That seems to be a bit high. Perhaps they'd take $150 if you explained your concern about getting warranty service as a subsequent owner. I see a couple of LG G Pads listed locally on kijiji for $150 so maybe you could even go lower. BNIB for $150 tax free seems quite reasonable compared to new for ~$275 with HST.
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Hemi558 wrote:
May 18th, 2017 9:31 am
A guy selling a brand new one in box with a brand new case for it for $185. A good deal, except not so much if lg is just going to turn their back on the warranty for not being the original owner
Is he providing you with a receipt ? if not then LG is less likely to honor warranty.

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