Computers & Electronics

Are Linux O.S moree safer than windows?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 19th, 2017 9:48 am
Tags:
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 17, 2006
4141 posts
2483 upvotes
North York
danieltoronto wrote:
May 29th, 2017 8:14 pm
If there is no data stored in a malware prone OS, the presence of malware is not even relevant. If they are on the rampage, just erase the whole thing and restore the OS from a cloned image
The key is to find out what malwares and why do you keep getting them? It doesn't help if you just reformat, reinstall, restore the OS everyday, just to get infected a couple hours later. Unless you got nothing else to do.

As OP is asking these questions, it's best if OP look for answers to what malwares are and how they infect your computers. Rather that, than trying every OS and still get infected. No OS is 100% safe. If there was such an OS, no one would ever be hacked (ask the governments)
How do I downvote this voting system?
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2013
3962 posts
437 upvotes
NORTH YORK
konsensei wrote:
May 30th, 2017 9:26 am
The key is to find out what malwares and why do you keep getting them? It doesn't help if you just reformat, reinstall, restore the OS everyday, just to get infected a couple hours later. Unless you got nothing else to do.As OP is asking these questions, it's best if OP look for answers to what malwares are
1. Just to id them, not to mention to remove them, needs a lot of effort, time and resource too. The worse malware comes from those running a business. How can average people fight except for sticking to some simple rule?
2. Before getting the answer, the OP needs something to act now
BTW I have not trashed my Window partitition for years already. Am I lucky or am I careful? The main reason is probably due to the rarity that I need to boot it up at all for some work that I cannot carry out under Linux.
As far as I know the best way to fight it is to isolate the Windows partition with no personal data therein. It is like compartmentalisation of personal data.That is the simpliest way as far as I know
Daniel

Fido $15 3Gb plan
free TextmeUp SMS & incoming call
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2013
3962 posts
437 upvotes
NORTH YORK
The heading: Are Linux O.S safer than Windows?
I can say it is affirmative. Those people writing malware would try to hit easy and more numerous targets.
Daniel

Fido $15 3Gb plan
free TextmeUp SMS & incoming call
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 17, 2006
4141 posts
2483 upvotes
North York
danieltoronto wrote:
May 30th, 2017 11:12 am
1. Just to id them, not to mention to remove them, needs a lot of effort, time and resource too. The worse malware comes from those running a business. How can average people fight except for sticking to some simple rule?
2. Before getting the answer, the OP needs something to act now
BTW I have not trashed my Window partitition for years already. Am I lucky or am I careful? The main reason is probably due to the rarity that I need to boot it up at all for some work that I cannot carry out under Linux.
As far as I know the best way to fight it is to isolate the Windows partition with no personal data therein. It is like compartmentalisation of personal data.That is the simpliest way as far as I know
Yes, the simple rules are don't click on links you don't know where they came from. Don't open email attachments without looking at the senders.
The most important, and hardest to follow: don't use illegal apps/programs download.

These are the rules that are almost always perfect solution to most viruses/malwares. Viruses/malwares don't just suddenly enter your computer.
How do I downvote this voting system?
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
15828 posts
1717 upvotes
Montreal
danieltoronto wrote:
May 30th, 2017 11:21 am
The heading: Are Linux O.S safer than Windows?
I can say it is affirmative. Those people writing malware would try to hit easy and more numerous targets.
Plus Linux users tend to be, well smarter. If you can install an OS from scratch, you are already head and shoulders over the general computing public.

A solution for the OP would be to use a Linux OS for general use, and keep a Windows guest in a Virtual machine for specific tasks. I keep a windows 7 VM, just to do stuff like update my Haarmony remote. Note that a Windows VM will not be able to have exclusive access to video cards or the like, so gaming is not an option.
Member
Dec 7, 2015
395 posts
75 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
mr_raider wrote:
May 30th, 2017 8:15 pm
Plus Linux users tend to be, well smarter.
Plus Linux users are forced to be, well smarter.

FTFY
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
15828 posts
1717 upvotes
Montreal
Gee wrote:
May 31st, 2017 2:44 am
What about us? The FreeBSD users?
You guys are just plain insane Face With Tears Of Joy
Member
Dec 7, 2015
395 posts
75 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
I set up one FreeBSD machine here and ... yeah, that's a special kind of pain. I couldn't get any audio or video format to play.
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2013
3962 posts
437 upvotes
NORTH YORK
willilumplump wrote:
May 31st, 2017 3:58 am
I set up one FreeBSD machine here and ... yeah, that's a special kind of pain. I couldn't get any audio or video format to play.
That reminds me of NT3.51 LOL
For newbies, as I have said above, try Linux mint or Ubuntu. The only hardware that I had trouble was a bluetooth dongle. But again that bt dongle could be a pos.
Daniel

Fido $15 3Gb plan
free TextmeUp SMS & incoming call
Member
Jan 10, 2017
276 posts
85 upvotes
GTA
danieltoronto wrote:
May 31st, 2017 5:05 am
That reminds me of NT3.51 LOL
For newbies, as I have said above, try Linux mint or Ubuntu. The only hardware that I had trouble was a bluetooth dongle. But again that bt dongle could be a pos.
Cheap Bluetooth and wifi dongle will usually never have native driver support in Linux. And the manufacturer won't bother of building one that's easy to install or to utilize an existing one.
Information Security Analyst
Member
Jun 10, 2006
304 posts
27 upvotes
If security and avoidance of malware is the goal, I guess Chromebooks should also be mentioned here as something to consider. I happen to run Linux as an additional option on mine, but the standard ChromeOS-based Chromebook (and Chromebox and Chromebit) devices take extreme measures to prevent malware infection e.g. read-only operating system partition, and controlled updates into the paired alternative partition -- which is then swapped during a reboot after an upgrade.
Member
Jun 10, 2006
304 posts
27 upvotes
MadCanadian wrote:
May 31st, 2017 7:33 am
Cheap Bluetooth and wifi dongle will usually never have native driver support in Linux. And the manufacturer won't bother of building one that's easy to install or to utilize an existing one.

In my own experience, the most commonly-available wifi/bt dongles that I have purchased (Amazon, eBay, etc.) have been Linux compatible -- but it is still always a good idea to verify ahead of time. I think it might be more common to experience Linux compatibility problems *internally* for wifi devices -- but even there in my own experience there have usually been work-arounds :)
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
15828 posts
1717 upvotes
Montreal
danieltoronto wrote:
May 31st, 2017 5:05 am
That reminds me of NT3.51 LOL
For newbies, as I have said above, try Linux mint or Ubuntu. The only hardware that I had trouble was a bluetooth dongle. But again that bt dongle could be a pos.
Yeah people seem to forget how painful the early days of windows was. Editing autoxec.bat and config.sys files, optimizing programs to run in high memory, having to manually fix broken .Ini files. Compared to that Linuxmint or Ubuntu is a cake walk.

Those of us who grew up in the late 80s and early 90s have far better understanding of how computers work than most kids today.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 20, 2011
7143 posts
2226 upvotes
ON
Most kids today probably don't even know why the save icon is shaped the way it is, nevermind how to use a command line ;)

Top