Computers & Electronics

Are Linux O.S moree safer than windows?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 19th, 2017 9:48 am
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Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2013
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aqnd wrote:
May 31st, 2017 8:53 pm
Most kids today probably don't even know why the save icon is shaped the way it is, nevermind how to use a command line ;)
Oh yeah...a floppy sign!
And nowadays nobody has any floppy
Daniel

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Sep 13, 2004
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konsensei wrote:
May 30th, 2017 12:24 pm
Yes, the simple rules are don't click on links you don't know where they came from. Don't open email attachments without looking at the senders.
The most important, and hardest to follow: don't use illegal apps/programs download.

These are the rules that are almost always perfect solution to most viruses/malwares. Viruses/malwares don't just suddenly enter your computer.
Please add: apply security updates promptly.

Good rules, but not sufficient. If you listen to the news you will hear of plenty of spear-fishing attacks. Those involve carefully crafted attacks that look like they come from your friends.

The recent WannaCry vulnerability did not require any dubious act from the victim. Just leaving SMB exposed to the internet would compromise Windows boxes. But before Linux users get smug, there was also a gaping hole in Samba. Of course most folks are behind NAT so these two problems would not make them vulnerable. https://access.redhat.com/security/cve/cve-2017-7494
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Aug 2, 2004
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mr_raider wrote:
May 31st, 2017 8:47 pm
Yeah people seem to forget how painful the early days of windows was. Editing autoxec.bat and config.sys files, optimizing programs to run in high memory, having to manually fix broken .Ini files. Compared to that Linuxmint or Ubuntu is a cake walk.

Those of us who grew up in the late 80s and early 90s have far better understanding of how computers work than most kids today.
I remember those days. himem.sys to load above the 1 meg barrier. Yeah. 1 meg not 1 Gig

Late 80's? I remember the Apple ][ days and the Commodore PET

I remember getting a floppy and thinking it was the greatest thing ever. No more tape.
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I recall even NT 4 was absolutely pita when it came to peripherals support
Daniel

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Hugh wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 9:45 am
Please add: apply security updates promptly.

Good rules, but not sufficient. If you listen to the news you will hear of plenty of spear-fishing attacks. Those involve carefully crafted attacks that look like they come from your friends.

The recent WannaCry vulnerability did not require any dubious act from the victim. Just leaving SMB exposed to the internet would compromise Windows boxes. But before Linux users get smug, there was also a gaping hole in Samba. Of course most folks are behind NAT so these two problems would not make them vulnerable. https://access.redhat.com/security/cve/cve-2017-7494
You CAN'T apply security updates promptly, if you are one of the first people to get attacked. A virus/malware has to be defined in order for antivirus/antimalware to create a vaccine for those.

The golden rules apply and stay. My close friends and family don't send emails. Phone calls and texts are cheap and readily available. If something is needed urgently, no one should be emailing anyway. Most of the phishing emails are easy to spot, because they are generic. When was the last time you actually received an email from your friends?

And by any chance, if they are so "carefully crafted", then you are clearly targeted. You should really ask yourself, Why are you being targeted? Are you that valuable to a hacker that he'd spend time researching you through your friends and family on social media?

Sure, not everyone is as careful knowing what link to click and what not.
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Nov 10, 2002
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I replaced my Dad's computer from Windows 10 to Neverware CloudReady Chrome OS. Works perfectly. All he need is Chrome & Google Docs, Done. Just works great. But it just won't goto sleep.

Replaced CloudReady Chrome OS to Elementary OS 0.4.1 and installed Chrome browser stable.

All I showed him was where the min/max/close buttons are now.


Opps, off topic.
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Feb 29, 2008
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xxgg wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 8:40 pm
I replaced my Dad's computer from Windows 10 to Neverware CloudReady Chrome OS. Works perfectly. All he need is Chrome & Google Docs, Done. Just works great. But it just won't goto sleep.

Replaced CloudReady Chrome OS to Elementary OS 0.4.1 and installed Chrome browser stable.

All I showed him was where the min/max/close buttons are now.


Opps, off topic.
My mom's been using Mint for three years. No viruses to worry about. Don't need to worry about her clicking on those "your computer is slow" links. Cut down tech support by 90% compared to when she used windows XP.
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mr_raider wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 9:13 pm
My mom's been using Mint for three years. No viruses to worry about. Don't need to worry about her clicking on those "your computer is slow" links. Cut down tech support by 90% compared to when she used windows XP.
I second that. Actually older people using LinuxMint has no issue at all if only browsing (using Chrome) , checking on email (Chrome too) and video conferencing (Skype) are involved. Once it is set up (icon on desktop), there is not much difference from Windows.

All they need to do is to turn on the computer, click on the icon and shut down the computer. It is easy and virus proof
Daniel

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danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2017 8:11 am
I second that. Actually older people using LinuxMint has no issue at all if only browsing (using Chrome) , checking on email (Chrome too) and video conferencing (Skype) are involved. Once it is set up (icon on desktop), there is not much difference from Windows.

All they need to do is to turn on the computer, click on the icon and shut down the computer. It is easy and virus proof

As an added bonus, if she downloads a "program" off the internet and tries to install it, it fails because it's an .exe file! Only problem is her chrome is chock full of extensions and addons cluttering up her toolbar. If only I could lock down chrome.
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Dec 7, 2015
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Ottawa, ON
If you set up a Linux machine and want it to fail to run an .exe they download, make sure you haven't installed WINE. WINE will allow it to run with varying degrees of success.
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mr_raider wrote:
Jun 2nd, 2017 10:08 am
Only problem is her chrome is chock full of extensions and addons cluttering up her toolbar. If only I could lock down chrome.
That is Chrome's issue. Even if your mom uses Windows, it is the same
Daniel

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Aug 3, 2014
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Hugh wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 9:45 am
Please add: apply security updates promptly.

Good rules, but not sufficient. If you listen to the news you will hear of plenty of spear-fishing attacks. Those involve carefully crafted attacks that look like they come from your friends.

The recent WannaCry vulnerability did not require any dubious act from the victim. Just leaving SMB exposed to the internet would compromise Windows boxes. But before Linux users get smug, there was also a gaping hole in Samba. Of course most folks are behind NAT so these two problems would not make them vulnerable. https://access.redhat.com/security/cve/cve-2017-7494
Don't accept candy from strangers.
Penalty Box
Mar 23, 2004
21649 posts
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danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 12:26 pm
I recall even NT 4 was absolutely pita when it came to peripherals support
That's because NT was never a "consumer OS" back then--it wasn't meant to support peripherals the general public would have. It was for businesses and it also ran terribly on the hardware most people could afford. Speaking of x86, NT didn't run well on anything that wasn't P6 architecture (i.e. Pentium Pro, Pentium II), so at the time, if you didn't have one of those running NT was simply a bad idea. Even though "Super 7" processors like K6, K6-II were competitive with PII for Windows 9x mainstream use, they couldn't touch the P Pro or PII for NT use. Since "normal people" did not use NT, that meant makers of common consumer peripherals also didn't bother making drivers for NT either--why bother with the cost/development for something your customer base wouldn't care about? For business-oriented devices though, drivers were definitely there.

Sure NT eventually became the mainstream OS (since XP) but back then, it wasn't an OS you used. Even Windows 2000 (NT 5) was "crap" from a consumer point of view. I remember a had a friend that insisted on using it despite all its shortcomings for "regular use". I tried it of course but I stuck with 9x, especially given I had older hardware at the time being young and not able to afford thousands of dollars for higher-end hardware. Even if I had a faster system though, I wouldn't have used it because I still thought it sucked, lol. For those that remember XP in its early days it was really bad...like really bad. That one I stuck through though, from beta onwards, but man XP was full of crap to begin with :lol: Then it lasted wayyy too long, but that's another story.
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ES_Revenge wrote:
Jun 3rd, 2017 1:45 am
That's because NT was never a "consumer OS" back then--it wasn't meant to support peripherals the general public would have.
Looking back, that were so true.
I recall I was able to sort out practically all the drivers of the perifpherals . It was challenge and fun
I did not make too much headway in NT3.51 (compared with NT4). NT4 came out soon enough
Daniel

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konsensei wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 3:10 pm
You CAN'T apply security updates promptly, if you are one of the first people to get attacked. A virus/malware has to be defined in order for antivirus/antimalware to create a vaccine for those.
Attacks mostly involve either exploiting a software bug or social engineering (or both). I worry more about bugs, and those I expect to be fixed promptly by the OS provider (not antivirus or antimalware providers).

Zero Day bugs are ones for which attacks appear before the fixes are distributed. There seem to be a lot of them but I think that is a perception, not reality. Being hit by one as a random target is rare unless the malware is very aggressive -- not actually that common. As a long-time linux user, I've never detected a successful attack on my systems (and not all my systems are behind NAT).
The golden rules apply and stay. My close friends and family don't send emails. Phone calls and texts are cheap and readily available. If something is needed urgently, no one should be emailing anyway. Most of the phishing emails are easy to spot, because they are generic. When was the last time you actually received an email from your friends?
Email threats come in the same two flavours: bug exploiting and social engineering. I've never had a problem with bug exploitation in 40+(!) years of using email. Perhaps because I use old-school text-based MUAs.

Some social engineering attacks have looked convincing at first glance. But so too have some fraudulent phone calls. Oh, and a fraudulent text message that I got yesterday.
And by any chance, if they are so "carefully crafted", then you are clearly targeted. You should really ask yourself, Why are you being targeted? Are you that valuable to a hacker that he'd spend time researching you through your friends and family on social media?
Everyone is important to a 419er. And some of us are important for other reasons.
Sure, not everyone is as careful knowing what link to click and what not.
Quite true.

As others have mentioned, switching careless users to Linux may help (I have only one first-hand data point).

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