Computers & Electronics

Are Linux O.S moree safer than windows?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 19th, 2017 9:48 am
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Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
Hugh wrote:
Jun 3rd, 2017 11:58 am
Perhaps because I use old-school text-based MUAs.
I thought I was the last person on earth still using Pine

30 years of email eh? You using ELM? Mutt?
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Sep 13, 2004
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Toronto
Gee wrote:
Jun 4th, 2017 12:48 am
I thought I was the last person on earth still using Pine

30 years of email eh? You using ELM? Mutt?
40+ years, not 30.

I use Alpine. So do my (adult) children.

Alpine seems pretty safe. I did report some dangerous bugs to the (late) Pine maintainer perhaps 20 years ago.

Mutt may well be better in some ways but I like emacs' system of keystrokes (my fingers have never learned vi keystrokes).

Getting back to security. Old programs are usually simpler programs, and simpler makes it easier to be secure. On the other hand, old programs were written without the security mindset that we all should have now. Typically old programs assume input is reasonable because why would anyone give them unreasonable input? But attackers do just that. It is often possible to drive old programs into integer overflow or buffer overflow.

Two Pine bugs that I remember reporting are typical.
  • When displaying the message index, pine would show the Subject of each message, without filtering out "dangerous" characters (think: control characters). This was fixed.
  • In C, only a very limited number of actions are allowed in a signal handler. This is inconvenient and the Pine maintainer decided to ignore the rules. Even when this was pointed out. I discovered this bug because pine misbehaved on Solaris.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
Pine has been abandoned for years now. As you know, it has evolved and Alpine has replaced it.

Unfortunately, I'm still using Pine. Never found a need to replace it
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Mar 28, 2006
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If you are very concerned about privacy, install Tails Linux for slow Internet. And never use Google, Google knows us more than ourselves. Oh, don't forget to use a piece of duct tape to cover the camera above the screen ;-)
https://tails.boum.org/

Yes, Win10 can be used offline.

For Linux, I like Linux Mint. Speaking of MINT, the official website got hacked 1-2 years ago the download file was pre-installed with malware. Make sure you have the latest download.




tester85 wrote:
May 29th, 2017 8:46 am
- Are Linux O.S more safer when it comes to privacy. I heard Intel and AMD chipset's has backdoor tool installed that may invade your privacy and now with windows 10.. no idea what is going in and out.
question:
- Can I installed windows 10 as a standalone O.S which will have no connectivity to Internet. Basically offline O.S. and I would like to run Linux O.S as main Operating system which will have access to Internet.
- Can this be possible?
- What Linux O.S can I install that has more support, more features and updated.

No, your method doesn't isolate the Windows Partition nor the Linux partition. They both are still very well aware of each other. Windows by default doesn't show EXT4 doesn't mean technically it cannot. To isolate Windows, install Windows on a VM or encrypt your primary OS partition. With Windows, you can use bitlocker to encrypt the file system to isolate any other dual boot OS.
danieltoronto wrote:
May 29th, 2017 4:52 pm
I beg to disagree.
The method that I detailed above, basically isolates the Window partition 100% with zero data theere. Any attack on it will not create any problem to the users (me included). I still use some software under Windows. And I use Linux for all major tasks as far as I can manage.
The only part that I agree: education helps and getting into a degree course definitely helps - in the long long run
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Sep 23, 2013
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NORTH YORK
82 wrote:
Jun 4th, 2017 4:16 pm
Windows by default doesn't show EXT4 doesn't mean technically it cannot. To isolate Windows, install Windows on a VM or encrypt your primary OS partition. With Windows, you can use bitlocker to encrypt the file system to isolate any other dual boot OS
No clue what you are saying. Windows cannot even see the EXT4 files at all. It may just see there is a partition though.
Using VM is another method. But it is a very resource demanding solution for average users/system
Daniel

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If you are no clue what I am saying, then I don't recommend anyone to follow your recommendations in post #5.
danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 7th, 2017 9:35 pm
No clue what you are saying. Windows cannot even see the EXT4 files at all. It may just see there is a partition though.
Using VM is another method. But it is a very resource demanding solution for average users/system
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Sep 23, 2013
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82 wrote:
Jun 4th, 2017 4:16 pm
Windows by default doesn't show EXT4 doesn't mean technically it cannot.
What is the chance of a malware or virus having installed a piece of Windows software (isolated) to (i) read/write surrounding partitions of EXT4 and (ii) to create hassle to a user ? The Russians government maybe capable I think
Daniel

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A malware itself is a piece of software. I just want to say that your suggestion is based on incorrect assumption. Dual boot is not a good security practice as you are combining the vulnerabilities of two operation systems. To isolate the two OSes, either encrypt the OS partition that you want to protect or use a hypervisor. I think I have explain enough and won't comment further. Other readers can make their own judgement.

I think OP's concern is privacy, so this is kind of off-topic. I think the bigger threat of privacy is Google, not any operation system.


danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 10th, 2017 1:30 pm
What is the chance of a malware or virus having installed a piece of Windows software (isolated) to (i) read/write surrounding partitions of EXT4 and (ii) to create hassle to a user ? The Russians government maybe capable I think
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Apr 16, 2001
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Oshawa
danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 7th, 2017 9:35 pm
No clue what you are saying. Windows cannot even see the EXT4 files at all. It may just see there is a partition though.
Using VM is another method. But it is a very resource demanding solution for average users/system
https://www.howtogeek.com/112888/3-ways ... m-windows/
Whenever someone asks a question that starts with "Why do they..." or "Why don't they...", the answer is always a) money, b) stupidity, or c) both.
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Sep 23, 2013
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Window cannot assess EXT4 file by default. But if one use Windows (with zero data there) surrounded by Linux partition and Linux data partition, there is zero chance that a malware or virus can install a piece of Windows software to (i) read/write surrounding partitions of EXT4 and (ii) to create hassle to a original user . Only the Russians government, if motivated, maybe able to I think.
Is a Linux partition foolproof? No. But the consensus in here is that it is a lot safer than a Windows partition.
Daniel

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Feb 29, 2008
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danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 13th, 2017 8:09 am
Window cannot assess EXT4 file by default. But if one use Windows (with zero data there) surrounded by Linux partition and Linux data partition, there is zero chance that a malware or virus can install a piece of Windows software to (i) read/write surrounding partitions of EXT4 and (ii) to create hassle to a original user . Only the Russians government, if motivated, maybe able to I think.
Is a Linux partition foolproof? No. But the consensus in here is that it is a lot safer than a Windows partition.
Yeah but a windows virus can still hose your windows data. If you have a windows install, you are using it for something, right?
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danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 13th, 2017 8:09 am
Window cannot assess EXT4 file by default. But if one use Windows (with zero data there) surrounded by Linux partition .
mr_raider wrote:
Jun 14th, 2017 9:44 pm
Yeah but a windows virus can still hose your windows data. If you have a windows install, you are using it for something, right?
The idea is that no data is stored in the Windows partition. After use , one can move the downloaded files (say .doc, avi...whatever) back to the safe Linux partition .
There is minor hassle involved
Daniel

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The point is your idea is not correct to begin with. If you want to isolate the two OS, two possible ways are encrypt the partition or use a VM. In theory, malware in Windows can affect both OSes, the same is true for Linux malware. You can't assume your Linux partition is safe unless you know what you are doing. Like I said before, there was a time hacker managed to hacked Mint's official download server and replaced the Mint ISO with one pre-installed with malware. Modern OSes are all pretty equal now in terms of security architecture, they are all very good but nevertheless still vulnerable to hackers.
danieltoronto wrote:
Jun 15th, 2017 7:45 am
The idea is that no data is stored in the Windows partition. After use , one can move the downloaded files (say .doc, avi...whatever) back to the safe Linux partition .
There is minor hassle involved

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