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Load bearing wall removal

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 11th, 2018 12:22 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2018
8 posts
3 upvotes

Load bearing wall removal

Hi all,

Just bought a townhouse and planning my renovations. Closing date is in a few weeks. I am planning on taking down a load bearing wall separating the kitchen from dining room. I hear this open concept thing is all the rage nowadays ;) Because my home is in a condo board, I will be securing all the necessary permits and doing all work to code, for the city of Markham.

I was hoping someone could help me out with the procedure here, I'm a bit confused as to how it's all going to work. I know I will need engineered drawings, just not sure in what order it all gets done. And exactly how detailed these drawings need to be.

It is a 12' wall on the main floor and will probably be supported by an LVL beam once it's removed. Have a contractor friend who will be helping me do the work

Thank you!
8 replies
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
12687 posts
3110 upvotes
Here 'n There
Don't do it because it's the 'all the rage nowadays' (which it has been for the last 30 years actually). Do it because you really want it. You need to get the the structural engineering drawings first and the engineer will know how detailed they have to be. Then apply for the permit.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2018
8 posts
3 upvotes
Thank you, no I definitely want it. Was just being sarcastic, because open concept seems so cliche nowadays. But I will definitely be removing that wall to open up the place.

Just worried about what we will find inside, as our budget is already tight
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2631 posts
778 upvotes
Open concept was all the rage starting thirty years back, and reaching a peak between about 20 and 10 years ago, approximately. It certainly is not all the rage, except with those who for some reason think it is all the rage. There are enough well written articles on the topic that give weight to the drawbacks of open concept.

It may look great to some, but real life functional issues have many people not in favour, especially after living is such a space.

I would never bother.
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
1293 posts
577 upvotes
Toronto
If you're going the full width, then you're probably not going to want a bulkhead across the ceiling where the wall used to be - you're going to want that new beam up in the ceiling, meaning cutting and hanging all the joists above on that beam. You also need adequate point loads on either end of the beam.

Your 'contractor friend' should know the steps in hiring an engineer, getting the drawings, submitting for the permit and moving forward. If he doesn't, find an actual contractor.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2018
8 posts
3 upvotes
torontotim wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 10:17 pm
If you're going the full width, then you're probably not going to want a bulkhead across the ceiling where the wall used to be - you're going to want that new beam up in the ceiling, meaning cutting and hanging all the joists above on that beam. You also need adequate point loads on either end of the beam.

Your 'contractor friend' should know the steps in hiring an engineer, getting the drawings, submitting for the permit and moving forward. If he doesn't, find an actual contractor.
I am ok with the bulkhead showing in the name of cost savings. I'm sure recessing the beam will cost a lot more in labor. If the engineer determines that new point loads need to go through to the basement for support, then I will be scrapping the project entirely.

My friend is a highly experienced red-seal carpenter and custom home builder. He has kindly offered his help, but I haven't wanted to bombard him with too many questions before I take occupancy.....so here I am.

I guess my question should have been more specific. Will I need detailed engineered drawings of the whole entire house, or a simple drawing of the wall area in question?
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2631 posts
778 upvotes
Are you even certain it is a load bearing wall to begin with?

Is it single door between the kitchen to dining room?

What about simply going to a double french door instead?
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
3875 posts
636 upvotes
Aurora
fieldhousehandyman wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 10:11 am
Open concept was all the rage starting thirty years back, and reaching a peak between about 20 and 10 years ago, approximately. It certainly is not all the rage, except with those who for some reason think it is all the rage. There are enough well written articles on the topic that give weight to the drawbacks of open concept.

It may look great to some, but real life functional issues have many people not in favour, especially after living is such a space.

I would never bother.
I would argue, with few exceptions, open floor plans are far more functional than "traditional" ones. This is particularly true in smaller spaces, like a typical townhouse.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Deal Addict
Jan 15, 2017
1746 posts
1188 upvotes
You may also want to check with your condo board to see if you can remove the wall. Need to find out who owns what when renovating condos.

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