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Locksmith in the GTA for Digital Door Lock installation

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 24th, 2017 4:16 pm
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Feb 2, 2011
6321 posts
1408 upvotes
Oakville/Toronto

Locksmith in the GTA for Digital Door Lock installation

I'm looking for a locksmith in the Scarborough area or anywhere nearby that can do a digital door lock installation.

I've researched it quite a bit and I've decided on going with Samsung Door locks, model #SHS-P717 or #SHS-3321, or one of each for front and side entrances. However, the authorized retailer (http://samsungdoorlock.ca/) charges $200 PER LOCK for installation, I haven't ever used a locksmith before and given how these locks are a bit tricky (from reading reviews), I'm looking to find a locksmith who is able to do it. Bena Co. says their locksmiths are the only ones capable of installing them correctly, I think it's BS and a lie to get me to pay for them, but I don't know any reputable locksmiths since every one that I've called said they can do any lock but a quote requires them to come in person and charge a fee to see the door before even installation.

Does anyone have any experience and can recommend anyone? Or just general knowledge about locksmiths?

Thanks!
19 replies
Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2006
4314 posts
342 upvotes
Burlington, Ontario
I just watched the installation video for that door lock.
$200 is a deal.
We install the Yale ones deadbolt replacement for slightly less, but it's also considerably less work compared.
Audio - Video - Data - Security - This is what I do
Sr. Member
Nov 7, 2012
657 posts
231 upvotes
TORONTO
What made you decide to get a Samsung door lock?

I never knew they made door locks.... And I don't see why you would need a locksmith to install it, unless it has something about it that most locks don't do.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Feb 2, 2011
6321 posts
1408 upvotes
Oakville/Toronto
akswun wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 3:20 pm
What made you decide to get a Samsung door lock?

I never knew they made door locks.... And I don't see why you would need a locksmith to install it, unless it has something about it that most locks don't do.
I was looking into Weizer/Kwikset locks originally, and my cousin recommended Samsung as a great one to go with. They're all pricey anyways and I might as well go with the recommendation as he hasn't been wrong on other things.

As for needing a locksmith, as @BuildingHomes said, it's a difficult lock, not just his opinion but from reviews and tutorials I've read/seen, everyone recommends a locksmith if you haven't done one before. I think it's that it's a very tight design that doesn't leave much wiggle room for error, so cutting size slots and assembly require experience to a certain degree that I don't have.
Sr. Member
Nov 7, 2012
657 posts
231 upvotes
TORONTO
Have you looked into the Schlage smart locks? Like the Sense?

I can see how the push/pull bar can be appealing. But other than that it seems like more of a headache and cost to install.

edit: Also, these locks are not really smart locks. No Z-Wave, bluetooth or wifi.
Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2006
4314 posts
342 upvotes
Burlington, Ontario
akswun wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 4:10 pm
edit: Also, these locks are not really smart locks. No Z-Wave, bluetooth or wifi.
'Smart' anything is really up for interpretation.
If the lock allows multiple keycodes, is that smart?
If the lock lights up green when you enter the right code and red when you don't, is that smart?
Audio - Video - Data - Security - This is what I do
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
842 posts
327 upvotes
Barrie ON
This is certainly a futuristic looking lock with the ability to open with a code, card or fingerprint, but it lacks a major feature that is currently being offered by the other major lock companies.

As we move into the future, home automation is becoming more common every day. I would be concerned about buying such an expensive lock, from a company that isn't known to be in the lock business. I think you would be better prepared for the future with a true "Smart Lock" which as akswun said, includes the ability to communicate with a home automation controller such as Wink, SmartThings, and my favorite Vera.

For example Yale, Weiser, and Schlage all make code locks that can interface with a Home Automation hub. This ability opens up a whole new world of features. You can lock/unlock you door from your phone while anywhere in the world. You can keep logs of who enters your home and at what time. You can setup codes that only work for certain period of time, so for example the maid can get in every Friday between 2-4. You can have your door automatically lock each night at dusk. You could have your hallway lights turn on whenever your door is unlocked. You can even have the door unlock automatically as you get close to home using geofencing (not something I would do personally).

To address some of the concerns other have raised regarding Smart Locks......

Having Multiple key codes is smart because you can keep track of who comes into your house, and it also helps ensure that all the buttons on the lock show equal signs of wear so there are no indications of what numbers are used in the combination.

If the lock lights up green when the correct combination is entered, that is not really a big security concern because hearing the motor turning the bolt is probably a bigger tip off that the correct combination was entered. If a wrong combination is entered an intruder will know that as well when the door won't open. The exception to this rule are some models of Schlage locks do not have motorized bolts, the knob still has to be turned manually after entering the correct combination. I would not purchase these locks because they eliminate the ability to automatically lock the door remotely or on a schedule.

Some code locks only allow a 4 digit combination, for a total of 10,000 different combinations while other allow up to 8 digit combinations for a total of 100,000,000 combinations. In most locks if the wrong combination is entered 3-4 times a warning alert sounds and the keypad become inactive for 30 seconds. Kind of like how breaking into an Iphone with a brute force attack is treated. Stay away from locks that only have 5 buttons (2 digits on each button), because these only provide 625 4-digit codes.

Of the three brands that I mentioned only Schlage is a class 1 lock, the others are class 2. I'm not sure what your Samsung lock would be. If you have any glass near your door, then even a class 2 lock is overkill.

Even if your not ready for home automation immediately , you will still have a nice electronic lock that you can pair up with your home automation system at anytime in the future.
Banned
Dec 5, 2015
1344 posts
439 upvotes
Thornhill, ON
The Samsung locks are way better than the weiser/schleage stuff. Also looks ton nicer

I have one and my friend installed it for me..Wasn't difficult at all..What took longest was the builder door didn't have standard diameter for deadbolt so he had to enlarge the deadbolt hole in door to fit standard sized Samsung...
Banned
Dec 5, 2015
1344 posts
439 upvotes
Thornhill, ON
Rick007 wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 10:53 pm
This is certainly a futuristic looking lock with the ability to open with a code, card or fingerprint, but it lacks a major feature that is currently being offered by the other major lock companies.

As we move into the future, home automation is becoming more common every day. I would be concerned about buying such an expensive lock, from a company that isn't known to be in the lock business. I think you would be better prepared for the future with a true "Smart Lock" which as akswun said, includes the ability to communicate with a home automation controller such as Wink, SmartThings, and my favorite Vera.

For example Yale, Weiser, and Schlage all make code locks that can interface with a Home Automation hub. This ability opens up a whole new world of features. You can lock/unlock you door from your phone while anywhere in the world. You can keep logs of who enters your home and at what time. You can setup codes that only work for certain period of time, so for example the maid can get in every Friday between 2-4. You can have your door automatically lock each night at dusk. You could have your hallway lights turn on whenever your door is unlocked. You can even have the door unlock automatically as you get close to home using geofencing (not something I would do personally).

To address some of the concerns other have raised regarding Smart Locks......

Having Multiple key codes is smart because you can keep track of who comes into your house, and it also helps ensure that all the buttons on the lock show equal signs of wear so there are no indications of what numbers are used in the combination.

If the lock lights up green when the correct combination is entered, that is not really a big security concern because hearing the motor turning the bolt is probably a bigger tip off that the correct combination was entered. If a wrong combination is entered an intruder will know that as well when the door won't open. The exception to this rule are some models of Schlage locks do not have motorized bolts, the knob still has to be turned manually after entering the correct combination. I would not purchase these locks because they eliminate the ability to automatically lock the door remotely or on a schedule.

Some code locks only allow a 4 digit combination, for a total of 10,000 different combinations while other allow up to 8 digit combinations for a total of 100,000,000 combinations. In most locks if the wrong combination is entered 3-4 times a warning alert sounds and the keypad become inactive for 30 seconds. Kind of like how breaking into an Iphone with a brute force attack is treated. Stay away from locks that only have 5 buttons (2 digits on each button), because these only provide 625 4-digit codes.

Of the three brands that I mentioned only Schlage is a class 1 lock, the others are class 2. I'm not sure what your Samsung lock would be. If you have any glass near your door, then even a class 2 lock is overkill.

Even if your not ready for home automation immediately , you will still have a nice electronic lock that you can pair up with your home automation system at anytime in the future.
Ya...But as you say...The weiser/Yale etc looks like complete garbage from the 80s with wonky proximity opening...Had it and returned it

You can also setup temp and limited access on Samsung and if you use keybad entry...You have to press random numbers each time before you enter your code to prevent fingerprint on frequently used numbers

The non Samsung electronic locks are pure garbage and junk..Not ready functionality and looks so cheap..Might as well keep ugly builder grade deadbolt.

I tried kevo and another schleage one...They're cheap for a reason
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Feb 2, 2011
6321 posts
1408 upvotes
Oakville/Toronto
I'm confused, what are people recommending?
Sr. Member
Nov 7, 2012
657 posts
231 upvotes
TORONTO
Doubleshot wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 11:22 pm
Ya...But as you say...The weiser/Yale etc looks like complete garbage from the 80s with wonky proximity opening...Had it and returned it

You can also setup temp and limited access on Samsung and if you use keybad entry...You have to press random numbers each time before you enter your code to prevent fingerprint on frequently used numbers

The non Samsung electronic locks are pure garbage and junk..Not ready functionality and looks so cheap..Might as well keep ugly builder grade deadbolt.

I tried kevo and another schleage one...They're cheap for a reason
I dunno, paying over $300 for a keypad deadbolt that doesn't have at least remote access is IMO not worth it. You're just running a glorified deadbolt at that point. Yeah you can set codes. But you can do that with any other keypad deadbolt.

I have the Schlage sense. Other than having a keypad. I do have remote access to it. I get notifications when I'm away from home when it's opened/locked. I get a real time log of what codes were entered. I can assign codes remotely if needed and even set time periods when that code can be used, which came in handy when I had my house painted. I can lock it or unlock it remotely if needed. I can set it to lock after a certain time period if needed, which is great if I forget to lock it. I can actually see what position it is in, again, remotely.

Again, the remote access is what makes it 'smart' to me. $300 is hard to justify for a deadbolt in any case... smart/dumb. But if I personally was going to spend that much, it better do more than just wake up when I come near it. It better do a lot more than be 'pretty'.
Sr. Member
Nov 7, 2012
657 posts
231 upvotes
TORONTO
Variability wrote:
Mar 22nd, 2017 8:02 am
I'm confused, what are people recommending?
not the Samsung
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
842 posts
327 upvotes
Barrie ON
Doubleshot wrote:
Mar 21st, 2017 11:22 pm
Ya...But as you say...The weiser/Yale etc looks like complete garbage from the 80s with wonky proximity opening...Had it and returned it ..........You have to press random numbers each time before you enter your code to prevent fingerprint on frequently used numbers
I don't want the other lock manufacturers to get the wrong impression. I didn't say the other locks looked like garbage, I said the Samsung looks futuristic. I have a double door front entry and I wanted a deadbolt that would match the existing hardware. With the large number of available locks it was easy to find a lock that matched my other hardware.

BTW, there are some smart locks with flat panels that also display the random numbers that must be pushed in order to spread out the finger marks. The problem with panel type keypads is that they usually have to be touched in a certain area before the pad illuminates. I felt that explaining the procedure to a friend or contractor would be difficult so I chose to buy a model with push buttons because it would be easier for everyone to use.

I also can't see a key hole on the Samsung lock. If the batteries were to die, then there is no emergency access to the door. I chose to purchase a lock that could use a key in case of emergency.

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