Careers

Looking to become a Police Officer...Any tips?

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 7th, 2017 1:10 am
Tags:
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 31, 2005
3290 posts
262 upvotes
Calgary
wethenorthca wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 2:06 am
In US its stressful & dangerous. In Canada its a walk in the park with fantastic salary ( almost double the US salary ), benefits, pensions & power tripping that comes with it.

A garbage collectors job is more stressful & dangerous than a Pig's job in Canada. Even a TTC driver's job is more stressful & much less pay than a Bacon's job in Canada.

Look at the Sammy Yatim killer, James Forcillo roaming the streets like nothing happened. Yet to spend a single day in jail.

toronto-police-officer-charged-second-d ... m-1373412/

Look at the off duty cop & his brother who beat up a black teenager with a steel pipe & he lost an eye. and the cover up done by their daddy cop & 2 police departments.

https://forums.redflagdeals.com/chief-s ... 2113517/2/

Very stressful ..huh ? If you are a cop in Canada you can get away with pretty anything, their strong Police Union will see to that.
Half of what a starting constable makes in Canada would be well below the poverty line in the US. And that's before pension and other deductions. I'm pretty sure US police aren't working for CAD30K gross as a starting salary.

It would be easier to believe what you say if it wasn't riddled with cop-hating rhetoric. You sound like you have a serious grudge.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2092 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
poleman wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 2:16 pm
In my last post I was going to give you the heads-up on some of the responses to expect, you know, the cop haters, etc. I see they didn't take long.

Anyways, you have to learn to deal with the scum of the earth as a police officer and their aftermath. And that means not only B & E types, but child abusers, their victims, speeders that of course don't deserve a speeding ticket but will verbally abuse you.
Dealing with these types is everyday, but as for the cop haters you usually only see them on boards such as this one, until they have to call 911, then they eat crow. The only unfortunate thing about these people is sometimes they have children. And so the circle of hate continues.

The unfortunate part of being a police officer is that you often become not just immune to the bad and the ugly, but you often become jaded. You will learn to not turn on the news at night.

The misguided people that think cops do nothing but give out traffic tickets really don't have a clue.
Last week a city cop was shot and killed in Abbotsford, BC. He was on traffic duty and answered the 911 call. While the civilians the guy was shooting at wisely ran for cover, he went after the guy.

So if you really want to become a cop, go for it.
There are too much competition. The cops that think it's too stressful should just quit and give others a chance to actually get in...I'd like to see what else they can do in the private sector to make that 100k salary.
[OP]
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 11, 2007
974 posts
9 upvotes
Scarborough
poleman wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 2:16 pm
In my last post I was going to give you the heads-up on some of the responses to expect, you know, the cop haters, etc. I see they didn't take long.

Anyways, you have to learn to deal with the scum of the earth as a police officer and their aftermath. And that means not only B & E types, but child abusers, their victims, speeders that of course don't deserve a speeding ticket but will verbally abuse you.
Dealing with these types is everyday, but as for the cop haters you usually only see them on boards such as this one, until they have to call 911, then they eat crow. The only unfortunate thing about these people is sometimes they have children. And so the circle of hate continues.

The unfortunate part of being a police officer is that you often become not just immune to the bad and the ugly, but you often become jaded. You will learn to not turn on the news at night.

The misguided people that think cops do nothing but give out traffic tickets really don't have a clue.
Last week a city cop was shot and killed in Abbotsford, BC. He was on traffic duty and answered the 911 call. While the civilians the guy was shooting at wisely ran for cover, he went after the guy.

So if you really want to become a cop, go for it.
People always hate, I've learnt that the hard way, but anyways I want to become a cop because I actually want to become a cop. Its what I've wanted to do for a while just haven't taken the proper steps in order to attain that goal. Thanks for the input
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
:facepalm:
[OP]
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 11, 2007
974 posts
9 upvotes
Scarborough
dante01 wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 3:13 pm
What about detectives ?
From what I know you need to go through the normal process of becoming a cop (ATS,PATI, ETC) work as a constable for X Amount of years and then you have an option to branch out. Its not as simple as "just" becoming a detective. They essentially want to see you can do it based on your past experience as an officer, if im not mistaken, you need to spend atleast 5 years as a constable before other options open up for you within the TPS ( Toronto Police )
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
:facepalm:
Newbie
Jan 7, 2009
28 posts
22 upvotes
Toronto
sal911 wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 9:41 pm
So...been interested in policing for a while, looked into it a year ago and they told me I needed to get my eyesight corrected (lasik) in order to start the process...my eyes are horrible lol but anyways Ive taken the decision to get lasik done...will cost me about 5k. Anyone got any tips or suggestions? ive been working in security for the last 2 years trying to get my experience up in the mean time.

Any help is appreciated!


TIF
Current Police Officer, as mentioned in previous posts I won't disclose which agency I work for (It's in the GTA and is one of the largest); I also won't go into politics, just know that much of this thread and many others have been hijacked with inaccurate information and hateful comments (but I'm used to it).

All I can say with regards to your application is unfortunately no one knows the magic formula to getting hired; the usual combination of a successful candidate is someone with good life experience, varied resume, post-secondary (can be college or university), physical fitness, decent driving record, person of moral character, decent background and extensive volunteer experience.

I know people that I work with who are former teachers, nurses, former private sector employees (from some of the biggest companies), computer scientists/engineers, mechanics, architects, PhD graduates, lawyers, chemists etc. etc. etc. hell I know a former Doctor who became a cop.
dante01 wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 3:13 pm
What about detectives ?
As I've told many who want to become Police Officers; you have to do your time on the "road" which is a minimum 4-5 years prior to getting into any specialized bureaus or units.
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 3:06 pm
There are too much competition. The cops that think it's too stressful should just quit and give others a chance to actually get in...I'd like to see what else they can do in the private sector to make that 100k salary.
All I will say is that "stress" is due to a multitude of years of seeing traumatic images (I've told a 6 year old that her father died on their 6th birthday to peeling a decomposed body off the floor and when I say peel, I literally mean peel), politics and the ever changing shift of society.
AndrewShev wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 1:34 am
for GTA agencies, not anymore...
If you still live with parents, then your chances just got 60% slimmer, no girlfriend or serious stable relationship, add another 20% there. If you have a lot of debts and traffic violations in the last 3-5 years, add another 10%. Peel police, OPP, and local Ontario police forces, get thousands of applications per year. If they need 10-50 officers per year, then do the math and analyze your chances.
I don't know where you got those numbers from, but it in correct. I know people who aren't in a relationship and still live with their parents who got hired, hell I lived with my parents when I got hired.

The competition is high in Ontario, When I got hired there were several thousand applicants for 35 positions. A lot of the GTA forces are actively hiring as within the next 3-5 years many of my colleagues will be retiring.


AndrewShev wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 1:34 am
I have friends in police all over Canada, they all come from different backgrounds and all say the same thing, "THIS JOB IS NOT FOR EVERYONE". It is very mentally challenging, VERY STRESSFUL and physically demanding. If you want the job for cool pics for facebook and show off in front of your buddies, then don't bother applying.
I will agree, the job isn't for everyone.
poleman wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 2:16 pm
In my last post I was going to give you the heads-up on some of the responses to expect, you know, the cop haters, etc. I see they didn't take long.

Anyways, you have to learn to deal with the scum of the earth as a police officer and their aftermath. And that means not only B & E types, but child abusers, their victims, speeders that of course don't deserve a speeding ticket but will verbally abuse you.
Dealing with these types is everyday, but as for the cop haters you usually only see them on boards such as this one, until they have to call 911, then they eat crow. The only unfortunate thing about these people is sometimes they have children. And so the circle of hate continues.

The unfortunate part of being a police officer is that you often become not just immune to the bad and the ugly, but you often become jaded. You will learn to not turn on the news at night.

The misguided people that think cops do nothing but give out traffic tickets really don't have a clue.
Last week a city cop was shot and killed in Abbotsford, BC. He was on traffic duty and answered the 911 call. While the civilians the guy was shooting at wisely ran for cover, he went after the guy.

So if you really want to become a cop, go for it.
Thank You, probably the best post in this thread.

Being a Police Officer, Fire fighter, Paramedic is not easy, and it's definitely not for everyone.

I can't tell you what it is like to be a fire fighter or paramedic simply because I'm neither of those two professions. Being a cop can sometimes be emotionally and physically draining, you deal with people at their worst and sometimes you get their worst, you'll have people screaming and yelling at you; you run the full gambit of human emotions, your job is to deal with people day in and day out; I've seen some of the worst things imaginable, things that have tested my faith in humanity and beliefs (I've seen people commit suicides, victims of heinous crimes, I've held on to people when they fall to the floor because I've just told them that their child, spouse, sibling, parent, friend, loved one is dead).

Some days you'll be responding to a stabbing, two seconds later your going to a sex assault involving a minor, two seconds later your holding a suspect at gun point because they attempted to just rob a store with a weapon and you honestly don't know if they have a weapon, two seconds later your racing down a major street going to a vehicle collision with entrapment..... Other days might be just full of domestics and traffic stops, you just don't know in this line of work.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2092 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
Comm wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:18 am
All I will say is that "stress" is due to a multitude of years of seeing traumatic images (I've told a 6 year old that her father died on their 6th birthday to peeling a decomposed body off the floor and when I say peel, I literally mean peel), politics and the ever changing shift of society.
If we're talking about the U.S. or any other country, I would agree. However, the fact that "Most" of the television news revolves around other countries (U.S. in general), there really isn't much going on in Canada. Compared to other countries, crimes here are almost non-existent. How do you justify the officers here being paid almost twice as much as a cop from the U.S. while the crime rates here are much much lower? Bare in mind, if officers aren't paid with my tax money, I literally wouldn't care.

Also, just look at all the funeral ceremonies for the cops. If you look at many other countries you won't even know if a cop died during a shooting, but in Canada a simple police assault gets broadcasted the entire day.
Newbie
Jan 7, 2009
28 posts
22 upvotes
Toronto
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:34 am
If we're talking about the U.S. or any other country, I would agree. However, the fact that "Most" of the television news revolves around other countries (U.S. in general),
You answered your own question in your response; most of the things you see on "TV" and the news revolve around the United States but again that's a dive into politics and media.
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:34 am
there really isn't much going on in Canada. Compared to other countries, crimes here are almost non-existent. How do you justify the officers here being paid almost twice as much as a cop from the U.S. while the crime rates here are much much lower? Bare in mind, if officers aren't paid with my tax money, I literally wouldn't care.
One would be surprised to know that some of the busiest court houses in terms of criminal matters are located within Canada. Also note that there is a difference between what is reported and what is not reported.

2009 and 2016 Stats Canada report indicated that many people did not report an incident of "crime" to police

2009 Stats Can

2016 Stats Can

Obviously for the police, we can't report a statistic if we have no complainant or victim.
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:34 am
Also, just look at all the funeral ceremonies for the cops. If you look at many other countries you won't even know if a cop died during a shooting, but in Canada a simple police assault gets broadcasted the entire day.
Most of the assaults occur against non-sworn members of the service (by-law officers, parking enforcement). I know I've been assaulted multiple times in the last year and so have my colleagues, it hasn't made the news.

Again this dives into the realm of politics and I do not wish to hijack this thread.
Deal Addict
Oct 13, 2014
1023 posts
452 upvotes
Somewhere, ON
Comm wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:18 am
Current Police Officer, as mentioned in previous posts I won't disclose which agency I work for (It's in the GTA and is one of the largest); I also won't go into politics, just know that much of this thread and many others have been hijacked with inaccurate information and hateful comments (but I'm used to it).

All I can say with regards to your application is unfortunately no one knows the magic formula to getting hired; the usual combination of a successful candidate is someone with good life experience, varied resume, post-secondary (can be college or university), physical fitness, decent driving record, person of moral character, decent background and extensive volunteer experience.

I know people that I work with who are former teachers, nurses, former private sector employees (from some of the biggest companies), computer scientists/engineers, mechanics, architects, PhD graduates, lawyers, chemists etc. etc. etc. hell I know a former Doctor who became a cop.



As I've told many who want to become Police Officers; you have to do your time on the "road" which is a minimum 4-5 years prior to getting into any specialized bureaus or units.



All I will say is that "stress" is due to a multitude of years of seeing traumatic images (I've told a 6 year old that her father died on their 6th birthday to peeling a decomposed body off the floor and when I say peel, I literally mean peel), politics and the ever changing shift of society.



I don't know where you got those numbers from, but it in correct. I know people who aren't in a relationship and still live with their parents who got hired, hell I lived with my parents when I got hired.

The competition is high in Ontario, When I got hired there were several thousand applicants for 35 positions. A lot of the GTA forces are actively hiring as within the next 3-5 years many of my colleagues will be retiring.





I will agree, the job isn't for everyone.



Thank You, probably the best post in this thread.

Being a Police Officer, Fire fighter, Paramedic is not easy, and it's definitely not for everyone.

I can't tell you what it is like to be a fire fighter or paramedic simply because I'm neither of those two professions. Being a cop can sometimes be emotionally and physically draining, you deal with people at their worst and sometimes you get their worst, you'll have people screaming and yelling at you; you run the full gambit of human emotions, your job is to deal with people day in and day out; I've seen some of the worst things imaginable, things that have tested my faith in humanity and beliefs (I've seen people commit suicides, victims of heinous crimes, I've held on to people when they fall to the floor because I've just told them that their child, spouse, sibling, parent, friend, loved one is dead).

Some days you'll be responding to a stabbing, two seconds later your going to a sex assault involving a minor, two seconds later your holding a suspect at gun point because they attempted to just rob a store with a weapon and you honestly don't know if they have a weapon, two seconds later your racing down a major street going to a vehicle collision with entrapment..... Other days might be just full of domestics and traffic stops, you just don't know in this line of work.
OP - This is probably one of the best and most current responses you can receive. You will not otherwise see a response from me if only because my time ended over 20 years ago and I do not feel I can give you up to date information such as above. The only thing I can add is to examine which potential department/force you wish to join. There is a big difference between city and rural. Although both can experience the same stresses, the needed support systems are vastly different due to location and environment.
“When you marry the right woman, you are ‘complete.’ If you marry the wrong woman, you are ‘finished.’ And, if the right one catches you with the wrong one, you are ‘completely finished.'"
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2092 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
Comm wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:49 am
You answered your own question in your response; most of the things you see on "TV" and the news revolve around the United States but again that's a dive into politics and media.



One would be surprised to know that some of the busiest court houses in terms of criminal matters are located within Canada. Also note that there is a difference between what is reported and what is not reported.

2009 and 2016 Stats Canada report indicated that many people did not report an incident of "crime" to police

2009 Stats Can

2016 Stats Can

Obviously for the police, we can't report a statistic if we have no complainant or victim.



Most of the assaults occur against non-sworn members of the service (by-law officers, parking enforcement). I know I've been assaulted multiple times in the last year and so have my colleagues, it hasn't made the news.

Again this dives into the realm of politics and I do not wish to hijack this thread.
So are you confirming that Canada has more assault/homicide and worse than US? If so, I guess I can agree that police officers gets paid SIGNIFICANTLY more than any other officers in the world while the population of Canada is only a tiny fraction of other countries' population.
Sr. Member
Nov 7, 2012
670 posts
238 upvotes
TORONTO
I've been toying with a career change the past couple of years. Currently a Psych nurse and have been for over 12 years. I have friend who's a cop as well who's been kinda coaching me on the possibility.

Other than what Blitzforce has stated a huge thing my friend pointed out about the profession is that as a cop... you will be hated. Paramedics and firefighters get all the glory. And cops get the short end of the stick. A cop does something in the US, guess what, you did it too. It's unfortunate because the police are the ones dealing with all the crap, again like blitzforce so vividly described. To add to all the crap you do on a daily, there is no 'satisfaction' in doing the right thing.

Other than that, another thing I'm concerned about is the current system. I work in healthcare. And as morally and ethically rewarding it may be, the system is broken. I've worked with various administrations at my hospital and some care and most dont. The same thing runs within the police force. You have officers that care and most that don't. You have administrations that want to either fix the problems, which much pushback from unions, and other that just want to 'get by'. I'm in the mindset of change for improvement... but I've learned all to well in my current role that sometimes the more you look to improve things there will be others out there looking to put you down because they don't want it to change.

Also my wife hates the thought of me becoming a cop. She thinks its dangerous. And it's fair for her to feel that, it can be.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 10, 2015
1029 posts
282 upvotes
Monte Creek, BC
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 11:21 am
So are you confirming that Canada has more assault/homicide and worse than US? If so, I guess I can agree that police officers gets paid SIGNIFICANTLY mort e than any other officers in the world while the population of Canada is only a tiny fraction of other countries' population.
I'm not sure what point you are trying to make here in regards to police salaries in Canada vs the US. But cops in Canada are generally paid well. Salaries for cops in the US are all over the place. Recently I came across minutes of a council meeting in a small US city. They were discussing the wages of a particular cop. It was just over $17/ hour.
Maybe this will partly explain why there are so many cops getting into trouble in the US. No doubt you've heard that expression, "you get what you pay for".

As for the media, I'll bet that 99.9% of police cases never make the news. Most people haven't a clue what goes on in their city.
Maybe the best eye-opener for you would be to go down to your nearest court house and spend the day there.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2092 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
poleman wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 4:24 pm
Maybe this will partly explain why there are so many cops getting into trouble in the US. No doubt you've heard that expression, "you get what you pay for".

As for the media, I'll bet that 99.9% of police cases never make the news. Most people haven't a clue what goes on in their city.
Maybe the best eye-opener for you would be to go down to your nearest court house and spend the day there.
Source: https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/0 ... _2012.html

I guess the only way to make sure the cops here aren't corrupt is to pay them so much higher than every other officers in the world. Or maybe they need to improve on their hiring practices. Nobody said they shouldn't be paid decently, but when "Sunshine List shows 40 per cent of police employees earned $100,000-plus in 2012", we have a problem.

I've also been to the courts. Mostly traffic tickets....a lot of them.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 10, 2015
1029 posts
282 upvotes
Monte Creek, BC
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 4:49 pm

I've also been to the courts. Mostly traffic tickets....a lot of them.
Ahh, that explains a lot.
[OP]
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 11, 2007
974 posts
9 upvotes
Scarborough
Comm wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 9:18 am
Current Police Officer, as mentioned in previous posts I won't disclose which agency I work for (It's in the GTA and is one of the largest); I also won't go into politics, just know that much of this thread and many others have been hijacked with inaccurate information and hateful comments (but I'm used to it).

All I can say with regards to your application is unfortunately no one knows the magic formula to getting hired; the usual combination of a successful candidate is someone with good life experience, varied resume, post-secondary (can be college or university), physical fitness, decent driving record, person of moral character, decent background and extensive volunteer experience.

I know people that I work with who are former teachers, nurses, former private sector employees (from some of the biggest companies), computer scientists/engineers, mechanics, architects, PhD graduates, lawyers, chemists etc. etc. etc. hell I know a former Doctor who became a cop.



As I've told many who want to become Police Officers; you have to do your time on the "road" which is a minimum 4-5 years prior to getting into any specialized bureaus or units.



All I will say is that "stress" is due to a multitude of years of seeing traumatic images (I've told a 6 year old that her father died on their 6th birthday to peeling a decomposed body off the floor and when I say peel, I literally mean peel), politics and the ever changing shift of society.



I don't know where you got those numbers from, but it in correct. I know people who aren't in a relationship and still live with their parents who got hired, hell I lived with my parents when I got hired.

The competition is high in Ontario, When I got hired there were several thousand applicants for 35 positions. A lot of the GTA forces are actively hiring as within the next 3-5 years many of my colleagues will be retiring.





I will agree, the job isn't for everyone.



Thank You, probably the best post in this thread.

Being a Police Officer, Fire fighter, Paramedic is not easy, and it's definitely not for everyone.

I can't tell you what it is like to be a fire fighter or paramedic simply because I'm neither of those two professions. Being a cop can sometimes be emotionally and physically draining, you deal with people at their worst and sometimes you get their worst, you'll have people screaming and yelling at you; you run the full gambit of human emotions, your job is to deal with people day in and day out; I've seen some of the worst things imaginable, things that have tested my faith in humanity and beliefs (I've seen people commit suicides, victims of heinous crimes, I've held on to people when they fall to the floor because I've just told them that their child, spouse, sibling, parent, friend, loved one is dead).

Some days you'll be responding to a stabbing, two seconds later your going to a sex assault involving a minor, two seconds later your holding a suspect at gun point because they attempted to just rob a store with a weapon and you honestly don't know if they have a weapon, two seconds later your racing down a major street going to a vehicle collision with entrapment..... Other days might be just full of domestics and traffic stops, you just don't know in this line of work.
Thank you so much for your advice and input, But I intend on constantly applying untill I have the chance to get in, wether that be in a year or 3-5.
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
:facepalm:

Top