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Looking to become a Police Officer...Any tips?

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 7th, 2017 1:10 am
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Newbie
Nov 13, 2015
48 posts
8 upvotes
Pitt Meadows, BC
Part of the reasons cops get paid well in Canada is that they are in a position of authority with significant opportunities to abuse their powers. Look at police corruption in countries where cops don't make decent wage. Same reason why judges are hired on tenure, you don't want judges making the judgement that saves their jobs than the right judgements.
Newbie
Jan 7, 2009
28 posts
22 upvotes
Toronto
sal911 wrote:
Nov 17th, 2017 2:21 am
Thank you so much for your advice and input, But I intend on constantly applying untill I have the chance to get in, wether that be in a year or 3-5.
That is a good attitude; some of my colleagues have tried for years to get to where they are now. Don't ever lose that passion, despite what others may think, it is still a rewarding and good career, I have no regrets whatsoever; after my stint in the military I tried to do the private sector stuff (worked at a bank in a position other than a CSR/FSR) that didn't work out for me, just wasn't interested.

rcmpvet wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 10:08 am
OP - This is probably one of the best and most current responses you can receive. You will not otherwise see a response from me if only because my time ended over 20 years ago and I do not feel I can give you up to date information such as above. The only thing I can add is to examine which potential department/force you wish to join. There is a big difference between city and rural. Although both can experience the same stresses, the needed support systems are vastly different due to location and environment.
Thank You, I feel as you have much to offer! Younger guys like me, we look up to the guys who wore the uniform before us.
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 4:49 pm
I've also been to the courts. Mostly traffic tickets....a lot of them.
POA court is different than Criminal Court; I would highly suggest you visit Old City Hall, Grenville and Davis or 1000 Finch Court. Again as another poster mentioned 99.9% of the cases won't make it to the news.
poleman wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 4:24 pm
As for the media, I'll bet that 99.9% of police cases never make the news. Most people haven't a clue what goes on in their city.
Maybe the best eye-opener for you would be to go down to your nearest court house and spend the day there.
akswun wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 11:58 am

To add to all the crap you do on a daily, there is no 'satisfaction' in doing the right thing.
I would disagree, as both of us (nurses and police officers) are taught; you do the right thing regardless. The "satisfaction" is knowing that you are there for someone at the greatest time of need, others may say what they want but I believe it.

akswun wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 11:58 am
Also my wife hates the thought of me becoming a cop. She thinks its dangerous. And it's fair for her to feel that, it can be.
I won't lie sometimes it can be dangerous; for someone to be dating or married to a cop it's hard. I give credit to my girlfriend for putting up with me, I know shes worried (although she doesn't show it) every time I go to work; but she also knows that if shes worried all the time, it'll paralyze her from living her life.
Newbie
Oct 7, 2016
58 posts
62 upvotes
blitzforce wrote:
Nov 16th, 2017 4:49 pm
Source: https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/0 ... _2012.html

I guess the only way to make sure the cops here aren't corrupt is to pay them so much higher than every other officers in the world. Or maybe they need to improve on their hiring practices. Nobody said they shouldn't be paid decently, but when "Sunshine List shows 40 per cent of police employees earned $100,000-plus in 2012", we have a problem.

I've also been to the courts. Mostly traffic tickets....a lot of them.

Look at any police force in Canada. Salaries for constables, after the usual 5 year training and probation periods, range between $70-90k/year, with the bigger cities/municipalities at the higher end. Then factor in about 10% in deductions for union dues and pension contributions, on top of the usual taxes. Anything pushing them over $100k is overtime, not salary - that’s additional time worked. Canadian salaries for cops - just like every other sector in Canada - is far closer to the center of the bell curve, unlike the US, where you’ll see extremes at both ends. Cops in podunk towns in Utah might make $40k (and where Sheriffs/deputies are elected, thanks to the US obsession over democracy - another can of worms), whereas cops in Santa Monica or Manhattan are making $300k with overtime (seriously - check out their earnings, especially in Californian cities where salaries are public and cops/firefighters can make $300-400k).

Regardless, salaries are pretty much in line with where they should be in Canada. Any less and police forces would struggle even more than they are to find decent applicants. And they are struggling - every force in Canada is facing attrition rates that they can’t keep up with. We have fewer cops in Canada, per capita, than the US as well.

Crime rates, per capita, are roughly the same - the US has more violent crime than us, but we have more property crime than they do. Reported crime has been in the decline since 1991, but responsibilities placed on police have continually increased - the amount of paperwork and policies in place have increased exponentially.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2075 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
HausPoor wrote:
Nov 19th, 2017 3:36 am
Look at any police force in Canada. Salaries for constables, after the usual 5 year training and probation periods, range between $70-90k/year, with the bigger cities/municipalities at the higher end. Then factor in about 10% in deductions for union dues and pension contributions, on top of the usual taxes. Anything pushing them over $100k is overtime, not salary - that’s additional time worked. Canadian salaries for cops - just like every other sector in Canada - is far closer to the center of the bell curve, unlike the US, where you’ll see extremes at both ends. Cops in podunk towns in Utah might make $40k (and where Sheriffs/deputies are elected, thanks to the US obsession over democracy - another can of worms), whereas cops in Santa Monica or Manhattan are making $300k with overtime (seriously - check out their earnings, especially in Californian cities where salaries are public and cops/firefighters can make $300-400k).
I am talking about salary. Usual taxes, we have to pay anyways. Also, you talk like private sector employees don't need to work overtime. In fact they do and most don't get paid. I never said no cops should be making 100k, but when so many of them make it into the sunshine list, that's when I have a problem. Just like the recent college strike, some of the "professors" literally said that because their position isn't full-time, they needed to wait tables as a side job to make ends meet. Meaning they don't have employable skills in the real world but is able to make $150/hour in a college with union.

All I hear is how many cops wants to quit and to tell others to apply if they think it's easy. However, there are 1000s of applicants, and very few actually get in. If no one wants to apply, then they can get paid a million a year and I wouldn't think they are overpaid. I thought since very few actually get in, I thought only the best of the best would get in but my the son of my mom's friend got it after applying for 2 years and he's just an average Asian joe, nothing special. Even he said he gets paid a lot for not doing much (issues traffic tickets) in Markham area.

Note that he wasn't able to find any decent paying job (isn't minimum wage) with his university degree after 2 years of applying, that's why he applied to be a cop in the first place.

At the end, I think cops in charge of homicides should be paid a good wage in order for them to stay motivated to deal with these sht. However, average cops dealing with petty thefts and unsignificant crimes or issuing traffic tickets really shouldn't be paid that much. Especially the ones just guarding a tiny pot hole repair construction area that does almost nothing the entire day except talk to the construction crew.
Member
Apr 30, 2013
312 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto
Meanwhile cops in the US are exposed to more danger yet paid much less. Cops here should be paid 35k-40k starting and slowly work their way up.

Entitled unions and backwards system. Like I said, enjoy the gravy.
Banned
Apr 2, 2017
4 posts
In police foundations usually 1-2 per class can make the cut.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 7, 2010
7913 posts
730 upvotes
One should not shoot to be part of Toronto Police. Too much crime and have lots to do. Better to be in smaller cities and towns.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 7, 2010
7913 posts
730 upvotes
freeforall wrote:
Nov 20th, 2017 2:33 pm
Meanwhile cops in the US are exposed to more danger yet paid much less. Cops here should be paid 35k-40k starting and slowly work their way up.

Entitled unions and backwards system. Like I said, enjoy the gravy.
You are joking right? I saw an ad for new york State troopers at the mall there. Start at 65k US, then after 2 years 80k. Then get another 3 years over 100k.
Newbie
Oct 7, 2016
58 posts
62 upvotes
freeforall wrote:
Nov 20th, 2017 2:33 pm
Meanwhile cops in the US are exposed to more danger yet paid much less. Cops here should be paid 35k-40k starting and slowly work their way up.
Not really. They have ten times the population and admittedly higher violent crime rates, but they also have more cops per capita - therefore, more backup. Total cost per officer is close to the same in the US and Canada, but as I already explained, they have a much wider discrepancy in pay and benefits. Some small town cops make less than $50k (but have extremely low costs of living), whereas other, bigger police forces pay much higher than any force in Canada. Case in point - look at the link below, it's California's public pay list, ranked by compensation. Top pay (total) for a basic police officer is $488,390. The search results only list 20 pages, but the bottom ranking 'police officer' still makes $250,621.

https://transparentcalifornia.com/salar ... cer&y=2016
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2008
757 posts
133 upvotes
Markham
HausPoor wrote:
Nov 20th, 2017 11:36 pm
Not really. They have ten times the population and admittedly higher violent crime rates, but they also have more cops per capita - therefore, more backup. Total cost per officer is close to the same in the US and Canada, but as I already explained, they have a much wider discrepancy in pay and benefits. Some small town cops make less than $50k (but have extremely low costs of living), whereas other, bigger police forces pay much higher than any force in Canada. Case in point - look at the link below, it's California's public pay list, ranked by compensation. Top pay (total) for a basic police officer is $488,390. The search results only list 20 pages, but the bottom ranking 'police officer' still makes $250,621.

https://transparentcalifornia.com/salar ... cer&y=2016
wow
Sr. Member
Nov 2, 2014
838 posts
198 upvotes
Scarborough, ON
Were cops in Ontario grossly underpaid in 2001?

Are police officers in Ontario currently being paid fair for the work that they do or is their room for more increases in the near future?

Tons of respect for the force and what they do, but they are simply overpaid in Ontario (not hating, but how many raises have the obtained in the past 15 years? Yet, they negotiated it, good on them and shame on us for caving.) for what they provide.

There is a reason for the extreme lineup to become an officer.


Good luck though OP, sounds like your head is in the right spot to potentially get your foot in the door.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2012
2778 posts
301 upvotes
Ottawa
RobertSmalls008 wrote:
Nov 22nd, 2017 11:51 am
Were cops in Ontario grossly underpaid in 2001?

Are police officers in Ontario currently being paid fair for the work that they do or is their room for more increases in the near future?

Tons of respect for the force and what they do, but they are simply overpaid in Ontario (not hating, but how many raises have the obtained in the past 15 years? Yet, they negotiated it, good on them and shame on us for caving.) for what they provide.

There is a reason for the extreme lineup to become an officer.


Good luck though OP, sounds like your head is in the right spot to potentially get your foot in the door.
I think that problem is that what police officers deserve and what we can afford to pay them are two different things. Do police deserve to be well paid? Yes, I think so. The problem is that we simply can't afford to keep paying them $100000-$125000 in base salary per year.
Deal Addict
Sep 20, 2008
1133 posts
220 upvotes
Kanata
I had a reply written out but the reality is that unless you are in the job, you won't understand why we get paid the way we do. And its not 125K base pay , few are over 100K and thats just. Those making 125K + are doing it because of overtime.
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2075 posts
349 upvotes
Toronto
Dark Phoenix wrote:
Dec 5th, 2017 5:25 pm
I had a reply written out but the reality is that unless you are in the job, you won't understand why we get paid the way we do. And its not 125K base pay , few are over 100K and thats just. Those making 125K + are doing it because of overtime.
Sorry, most jobs in the private sector do not get paid for overtime. Also, if regular citizens including myself don't have to pay so much taxes (buying things with our "after-tax" money also get taxed), we wouldn't be complaining as much. Please give me a few examples of careers where people can make 100k with an arts degree, non-STEM, non commission-based, and without being in management.

Nobody said police officers shouldn't be paid well, but when they are paid so much more than everyone else that isn't in some prestigious career, and hardly have anything left after taxes + GST taxes, it's a problem.

O yes, I just found out that TTC booth ticket collectors can make 100k doing overtime as well. I've read through their financial statements and they don't even make enough from fares to pay for even the employee salaries alone, and their government subsidy is higher than the revenue amount...

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