Pets

Looking for rental - Should I stop disclosing that I have a cat?

[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 7, 2009
13647 posts
1259 upvotes

Looking for rental - Should I stop disclosing that I have a cat?

So I've been looking for a new place for a few months now, and so far I've been very up front about the fact that I have a cat.

About my cat:
Ragdoll
Adult female, spayed, uses her scratching pad and litter box. Lazy and quiet.

Usually this is how it goes

1.) Look up ad on Kijiji

2.) Text or email owner that I'm interested. Disclose cat as a courtesy

3.) Then one of three things happens. I'll go from most to least common
- radio silence
- simple rejection
- nebulous allergy claim

Now in Ontario it is a courtesy to inform a landlord about pets, since they cannot enforce a lease banning them. I am strongly considering suspending this courtesy in light of the fact that it seems to never go unpunished. I frankly feel like having a pet is pretty common. In fact, of all my friends and relatives, every single one of them has a pet. I don't want to live in a ghetto because I have a cat.

How would you proceed?
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
16 replies
Sr. Member
Nov 7, 2012
803 posts
303 upvotes
TORONTO
It really depends on what kind of rental you're seeking.

If you're looking at a room in a boarding type house, then maybe some consideration. If you're looking to rent a whole floor (basement) and have the owners living in the same house.... again a little consideration.

But if you're looking at apartment buildings/condos, IMO, you can omit this. But I'd feel bad for a condo owner realizing after they get the contracts signed that the renter has a large dog.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
6447 posts
3544 upvotes
Edmonton
If nothing else, I would stop volunteering the information...

C
Sr. Member
Feb 16, 2013
776 posts
708 upvotes
Toronto
Get unit.
Show up with cat a week later, it's a scumbag thing to do but may be your only option.
Member
Apr 6, 2008
494 posts
174 upvotes
I definitely wouldn't volunteer the information. If the listing specifically says "no pets" I usually ask the owner the reasoning for it. If it sounds like a sound reason, I will respect it and move on (like a duplex and one side has serious allergies). However, if they don't have a sound excuse I move in and a week later "decide" to get a cat. Just make sure you're animal is behaved and no one will say a word.
Sr. Member
May 21, 2015
529 posts
217 upvotes
Sarnia, ON
It's illegal to even post no pets in a rental ad , so if I was you I'd say nothing and just move in with my cat.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
6447 posts
3544 upvotes
Edmonton
Beneful1 wrote:
Dec 31st, 2017 4:11 pm
It's illegal to even post no pets in a rental ad , so if I was you I'd say nothing and just move in with my cat.
Where do you get that idea? Everything I've read says that the landlord can decline to rent to someone with a pet, if they know about it in advance. They just can't kick someone out if they DO have a pet, even if the tenant signed a "no pet" clause in their lease. But there's nothing illegal about saying "no pets" up front; the landlord just can't enforce it.

C
Newbie
May 28, 2007
74 posts
11 upvotes
Toronto
Check your Provincial Landlord/Tenant laws. In Ontario supposed to be illegal to ban pets unless the there is an existing condo rule - so over here we don't have to disclose having a pet in non-condo situations. Not sure if Alberta has similar laws. Just because a landlord puts something in a lease does not make it automatically enforceable or legal - there are so many small-time landlords in Toronto many of them don't have a clue what they are doing.
[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 7, 2009
13647 posts
1259 upvotes
CNeufeld wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2018 10:25 am
Where do you get that idea? Everything I've read says that the landlord can decline to rent to someone with a pet, if they know about it in advance. They just can't kick someone out if they DO have a pet, even if the tenant signed a "no pet" clause in their lease. But there's nothing illegal about saying "no pets" up front; the landlord just can't enforce it.

C
This is my understanding as well, and as a result, pretty much 99% of landlords ask up front and most ask for it on the paper application.

I don't want to go into a long-term relationship like a lease with an adversarial relationship with the home owner, but I don't really see any other choice. The law is on my side for a reason, but I feel like flexing my right to omit disclosure is no way to kick things off.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 1, 2011
6069 posts
1313 upvotes
I believe the landlords can make a case against your pet if they can prove that they--or other tenants--have serious problems e.g. allergies or other medical issues due to your pet; they just cannot make a broad ban against pets in general.

I like cats a lot but unfortunately I have a serious allergy to cat dander. I did the allergy prick test twice in my life and the "cat dander" spot will expand roughly to the diameter of a grapefruit on my arm. I don't have asthma, but I will sneeze if I'm even just around someone with cat hair on their clothes, and my skin goes to shit. If I touch a cat (which I often will, I enjoy petting and playing with them on occasion) I wash my hands immediately after.

If someone has bad asthma due to cats it could be on you.

Therefore, I don't think it's a good idea to sneak a pet in.
[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 7, 2009
13647 posts
1259 upvotes
peanutz wrote:
Feb 24th, 2018 11:43 pm
I believe the landlords can make a case against your pet if they can prove that they--or other tenants--have serious problems e.g. allergies or other medical issues due to your pet; they just cannot make a broad ban against pets in general.

I like cats a lot but unfortunately I have a serious allergy to cat dander. I did the allergy prick test twice in my life and the "cat dander" spot will expand roughly to the diameter of a grapefruit on my arm. I don't have asthma, but I will sneeze if I'm even just around someone with cat hair on their clothes, and my skin goes to shit. If I touch a cat (which I often will, I enjoy petting and playing with them on occasion) I wash my hands immediately after.

If someone has bad asthma due to cats it could be on you.

Therefore, I don't think it's a good idea to sneak a pet in.
The last thing I would want to do, would be to force someone like yourself to accept me as a tenant, given your allergy. I live with someone with severe allergies to certain foods, so I'm not insensitive. Still, I would hope you would make an effort to distinguish yourself from what I can only imagine is (just anecdotally at this point) the vast amount of home owners, who are simply hedging their bets away from renting to pet owners, simply because it's a sellers' market, and why take the risk of property damage?

I don't think there's an easy answer here. I would just encourage landlords to make their case explicit, if there is serious consequences to having pets on the property.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 1, 2011
6069 posts
1313 upvotes
Syne wrote:
Feb 25th, 2018 2:52 am
The last thing I would want to do, would be to force someone like yourself to accept me as a tenant, given your allergy. I live with someone with severe allergies to certain foods, so I'm not insensitive. Still, I would hope you would make an effort to distinguish yourself from what I can only imagine is (just anecdotally at this point) the vast amount of home owners, who are simply hedging their bets away from renting to pet owners, simply because it's a sellers' market, and why take the risk of property damage?
I am correcting the implication from several posters that lying about the absence of a pet is merely covered under basic tenant rights. If a landlord or another tenant has documentation that they have an allergy to your pet and can make a reasonable case that their daily quality of life is affected by it, the animal can be ordered removed (or the tenant evicted.)

It's your choice if you want to call their bluff

I fail to see a need to "try to distinguish myself" from others that you are assuming do not have valid concerns. That's your assumption, not mine.
[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 7, 2009
13647 posts
1259 upvotes
peanutz wrote:
Feb 25th, 2018 4:30 am
I am correcting the implication from several posters that lying about the absence of a pet is merely covered under basic tenant rights. If a landlord or another tenant has documentation that they have an allergy to your pet and can make a reasonable case that their daily quality of life is affected by it, the animal can be ordered removed (or the tenant evicted.)

It's your choice if you want to call their bluff

I fail to see a need to "try to distinguish myself" from others that you are assuming do not have valid concerns. That's your assumption, not mine.
I'm happy assuming you're correct on that point, but from what I can tell searching Kijiji, landlords brazenly state their pet preferences with no reason at all. I'm unsure whether there's simply a lack of understanding what tenant laws are, or landlords are simply choosing to ignore it.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
Banned
Oct 10, 2011
505 posts
29 upvotes
Toronto
It's a goddamn cat, when has cats hurt anyone to be denied of residence in a household. I think you should let em know and explain, maybe show pictures of the cat or bring your cat and introduce them lmao. Not like its a dog that may bark and stuff, I have a scottish fold and hes super friendly, polite and soft spoken everyone loves him.

Top