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  • Nov 16th, 2017 3:29 pm
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Aug 25, 2006
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Rick007 wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 4:41 pm
In fact everyone should follow the 3-2-1 rule.
HDD technically = the same type of media but always fun to bring up :). In today's terms, the 2 media rule may also mean 2 locations and on separate HDD's. ie. 3-2-1 is great and know that 2 different media could also mean data on HDD's but in separate devices.

Note: heaven forbid we have to use DVD or tape for a "different" type of media!
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Aug 23, 2004
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Gee wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 6:53 pm
Are you running a RAID on the three 4 terabyte drives?
Running Synology Hybrid RAID on all 4 drives.
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Aug 2, 2004
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apvm wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 7:19 pm
Running Synology Hybrid RAID on all 4 drives.
What happens if the Synology box goes bad? Can you remount the hard drives in a new box and recover your Data?
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Gee wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 7:34 pm
What happens if the Synology box goes bad? Can you remount the hard drives in a new box and recover your Data?
Need to be another Synology box, I am planning to replace the 3TB with a 4TB and convert from SHR to Real Raid 5, but to be honest most files there are expendable. My important files are back up on an external drive and also on the Synology and an Asustor 1004T (The DS413 is used at $180, 1004T bought from NCIX ebay store at $240). Planning to back up important files to cloud as well when I have the time.
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apvm wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 6:23 pm
+1 to Synology and 4 bays, I have a DS413 with three 4TB drive and one 3TB drive, storing all my MP4 which I convert from my VHS tapes collection, DVD ISO from my DVD collection and Bluray (not as much) ISO to play them via Kodi with my Nexus player.
+1 more for Synology.

Running a 1817+ with six 6 TB Reds.

Manages my downloads, serves my content, and more. The more I'm still figuring out lol.

Will be tinkering with the 10 GBe connection if I can find a good value on a router this next week.
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Feb 29, 2008
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I have a QNAP. Used to have a Synology. If I was to it over today, I would build my own system from scratch and install some flavor of Linux on it.
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Rick007 wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 4:41 pm
My recommendation (in fact what I am doing) is to get a 2-bay Synology and mount the drives as separate volumes. There are a large number of add-on packages made for Synology. One of them being "Cloud Sync". Cloudsync can automatically backup selected folders on your NAS to Cloud backup services like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Dropbox,etc. If you have some free accounts at these locations, you might already have enough space for your backups. By doing this you meet the 3-2-1 rule by getting your 3rd backup, on different media, at an offsite location. Other Synology add-ons include a web server and VPN server, and File Station which allows remote access to all your files.

In addition to the 2-Bay Synology, I re-used an inexpensive Western Digital "My Cloud" NAS. The total cost was less than a 4-Bay Synology, and the WD counts as a third backup location. You can let the Synology serve your files and run it's add-on packages, while you hide the cheaper WD somewhere in your house where it is less likely to get stolen or burn up in a fire. The Synology can back up all it's data automatically to the WD, using Rsync protocol, or you can do it from the PC at the same time you make the Synology backup. As an alternative you can alternate backups between the 2 NAS's to give you a couple of historical version to recover from.
I have a similar set up, running each drive as a separate volume and backing up to individual external drives periodically that are stored offsite.
"I don't even know what this is and i just ordered it... damn it rfd."
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rebel_rfd wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 11:30 am
Get a Mediasonic instead to keep costs down.
Don’t buy a Mediasonic. Most of the units are USB only and doesn’t have any networking capability.

They’re cheap for a reason.

You can build a 4 bay NAS for ~$360. Drives are the most expensive part of the build.
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I mean for his purposes of serving files, backing up, a mediasonic might be more cost effective.

Most people don't consider that NASes are meant to be always on,so if you have no need for an always on device, well there are other options.
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People that own a NAS are not simply backing up files.

They're media hoarders.

Real data doesn’t take up a lot of space. If you have personal files and pictures you can probably back up a life time worth on a large flash drive. If this is your intent, then the 3-2-1 is easy. Get an external drive, get a flash drive and get a free cloud account. Back up all your data.

You have a copy on your computer, a copy on your external hard drive, a copy on a flash drive and a copy offsite in a cloud.
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Build your own NAS and upgrade it over time. You can pickup a cheap Supermicro board and Xeon CPU from eBay.

If you're looking for something simple, go with unRAID. Otherwise, Proxmox and ZFS combo is hard to beat though there is a learning curve. For all the apps or services, use docker containers. Can't get anymore easier.
Pegasus: Dual Intel Xeon E5-2650 / Intel S2600CP2J / Hynix 128GB 1600MHz DDR3 ECC / HGST Deskstar NAS 4TB x15 (60TB) / Crucial M500 240GB SSD
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Gee wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 11:30 am
People that own a NAS are not simply backing up files.

They're media hoarders.

Real data doesn’t take up a lot of space. If you have personal files and pictures you can probably back up a life time worth on a large flash drive. If this is your intent, then the 3-2-1 is easy. Get an external drive, get a flash drive and get a free cloud account. Back up all your data.

You have a copy on your computer, a copy on your external hard drive, a copy on a flash drive and a copy offsite in a cloud.
I agree, I'm just wondering how they are managing playback on their devices?

I'm using a combo of a Nvidia Shield Pro and Synology 1817+ to manage my media consumption.
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East Gwillimbury
rebel_rfd wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 2:07 pm
I'm using a combo of a Nvidia Shield Pro and Synology 1817+ to manage my media consumption.
If you have the Shield, I would use ES File Explorer Pro and MX Player Pro together to access the files from your NAS. That is what I recommend for anything Android. Use ES to browse the network.

For Apple, nPlayer Pro is a good choice.

VLC for Mac and PC
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Aug 4, 2008
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Gee wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 3:09 pm
If you have the Shield, I would use ES File Explorer Pro and MX Player Pro together to access the files from your NAS. That is what I recommend for anything Android. Use ES to browse the network.

For Apple, nPlayer Pro is a good choice.

VLC for Mac and PC
Right now I'm using the Shield to serve media with Plex. It's accessing the network storage. Pretty good job with 50 TBs. Only issue is PGS subs hit harder on teh trasncoder.
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East Gwillimbury
rebel_rfd wrote:
Nov 15th, 2017 3:11 pm
Right now I'm using the Shield to serve media with Plex. It's accessing the network storage. Pretty good job with 50 TBs. Only issue is PGS subs hit harder on teh trasncoder.
You shouldn’t need to transcode for local playback.

Personally not a fan of Plex, but I can understand why people like it. Plex is only useful if you stream over the internet to a mobile device.

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