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lumps in carpet underpad

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  • Jan 20th, 2009 6:23 pm
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[OP]
Member
Mar 6, 2002
212 posts
1 upvote

lumps in carpet underpad

Hi all,

we moved into a new construction house 6 months ago and have noticed several "lumps" in our carpets upstairs.

While they are not visible, you can certainly feel them when walking on the carpet. Today, one of the builder's service guys came up and pulled up the carpet in one of the bedrooms and we noticed that the actual underpad has random hard plastic/rubber particals that are causing these lumps. This is an upgraded underpad that we paid over $1500 to upgrade.... is this normal or should I be going after the builder to replace the underpad?
12 replies
Deal Addict
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Jan 27, 2007
4451 posts
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Those harder particles are meant to be in the underpad. When the carpet is overtop, you shouldn't be able to feel them, even stepping directly on them.

The pad can bunch up, if it wasn't properly stapled down, but it would have to slide around to do so, not likely with heavy carpet over top, unless the carpet is sliding around first.

My feeling is that the carpet wasn't stretched enough when installed and is causing this. If the carpet moves, the pad can move (if it wasn't stapled properly) causing bunps in the pad and carpet. In any event, the the carpet has to move first. Is the bunching in the high traffic areas like doorways and halls - if yes, carpet is not stretched enough.
Deal Fanatic
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Jul 4, 2004
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Another thing that it could be is garbage the workmen couldn't have been bothered to sweep down the furnace vents like they normally do. Both of these are not good to do.

Definitely put this down on your 6 month or 1 year home inspection list to get it corrected if it doesn't ease over time.
[OP]
Member
Mar 6, 2002
212 posts
1 upvote
dutchca wrote:
Oct 31st, 2008 1:09 am
Those harder particles are meant to be in the underpad. When the carpet is overtop, you shouldn't be able to feel them, even stepping directly on them.

The pad can bunch up, if it wasn't properly stapled down, but it would have to slide around to do so, not likely with heavy carpet over top, unless the carpet is sliding around first.

My feeling is that the carpet wasn't stretched enough when installed and is causing this. If the carpet moves, the pad can move (if it wasn't stapled properly) causing bunps in the pad and carpet. In any event, the the carpet has to move first. Is the bunching in the high traffic areas like doorways and halls - if yes, carpet is not stretched enough.

there isnt really any bunching of carpet.. just feeling hard spots when walking on it. I thought it may have been construction debree underneath, but now thinking it could be a cheap carpet. The builder's features list says luxury 40 oz broadloom, but our carpet feels very rough (synthetic-like) and I dont know how to tell if its really a 40 oz'er...

any thoughts?
Deal Expert
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May 10, 2005
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Ottawa
ruvz wrote:
Oct 31st, 2008 10:57 am
there isnt really any bunching of carpet.. just feeling hard spots when walking on it. I thought it may have been construction debree underneath, but now thinking it could be a cheap carpet. The builder's features list says luxury 40 oz broadloom, but our carpet feels very rough (synthetic-like) and I dont know how to tell if its really a 40 oz'er...

any thoughts?
Foam chip underpad does not have "hard" particles in it. You could have debris under the pad or more likely, you could have nail pops in some areas and that is what you feel. You need to isolate the exact areas of these "hard" spots and see how big they ar. Try hitting them with a hammer, maybe they will go away.
As to the quality of your carpet, well, only you can make that comparison.
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Jul 4, 2004
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ruvz wrote:
Oct 31st, 2008 10:57 am
there isnt really any bunching of carpet.. just feeling hard spots when walking on it. I thought it may have been construction debree underneath, but now thinking it could be a cheap carpet. The builder's features list says luxury 40 oz broadloom, but our carpet feels very rough (synthetic-like) and I dont know how to tell if its really a 40 oz'er...

any thoughts?
The only 40 Oz'er there was was when the installers had drunken it prior to installing your carpet.

My builder installed carpet that had faded in some areas in as little as 2 years and I also had the problem with bumps under the rug. Over time walking on it has made the "bumpy" areas go down. It's now not very noticeable anymore.
Sr. Member
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Dec 18, 2004
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GTA
they are recycled ,sometimes you can see the old staples inside the pad,sometimes the the top finish layer silver or gold color has some lumps in it.like melted plastic .
it's amazing how can they charge the homeowners that kind of money when underpading worth less than $ 300
[OP]
Member
Mar 6, 2002
212 posts
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TTony wrote:
Nov 1st, 2008 1:50 am
they are recycled ,sometimes you can see the old staples inside the pad,sometimes the the top finish layer silver or gold color has some lumps in it.like melted plastic .
it's amazing how can they charge the homeowners that kind of money when underpading worth less than $ 300
.

That's exactly what I found in the underpad... melted plastic and rubber particles.

Should I be going after the builder for a new underpad or carpet?
Deal Addict
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Nov 6, 2007
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I say some dead mice are under there. But I love Frankie3s' comment:Another thing that it could be is garbage the workmen couldn't have been bothered to sweep down the furnace vents like they normally do.

Funny and true!
Newbie
Jan 19, 2009
2 posts
vestal
It is worth your investment to put a pad under the carpet because they'll be no end to it stretching on the laminate, and it may become a hazard with a baby - especially carrying the child and tripped yourself.

If it is a bonded carpet - meaning the edges have a fabric or stitched bond on all sides, that's different but it will still "relax" and hold up better if you get it off the laminate flooring.

You might call some carpet companies and ask them for estimates on stretching it and installing it on a pad because 18' is a carpet to go without being secured unless it's a decorative item.


Chandler Carpet Cleaning
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Oct 26, 2008
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The lumps underneath my carpet were clumps of dried up drywall compound.

You wouldn't believe how much crap the builders leave behind before the carpet and drywall goes up. I sneaked into my house the day before the drywall went up and scooped up so much crap that can make you sick to your stomach. Things like half eaten sandwiches, McDonald's wrappers, decaying fruits, cigarette butts just to name a few would still be inside my walls right now if I didn't take the plunge to do the clean up myself.
[OP]
Member
Mar 6, 2002
212 posts
1 upvote
They are unfortunatly not drywall. I raised the carpet in one of the bedrooms and those lumps are hard plastic compoud within the underpad itself. I have since put this in a notice to the builder, adding in an issue that I have with the carpet itself (the thing sheds synthetic fibers like mad and is very "rough" to the touch).... Havent heard peep from the builder, and really doubt they will do anything about it.
Jr. Member
Aug 2, 2008
179 posts
1 upvote
claringtonca
you can send the builder a request to have it fixed and send a copy to TARION dont know how long you have been in the house was it noted on your PDI 30 day list if so you can call for a concillation cost to you 50 bucks
and you get it back when the builder is found at fault
no under pad should have lumps in it call for a concillation anyway
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