Automotive

Manual Transmission Driving Tips

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  • May 27th, 2015 3:18 am
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Sr. Member
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May 23, 2011
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Question: If most of the fuel economy from manual transmissions comes from being able to select a better gear, would tiptronic ("manumatic") be considered just as efficient in that regard?

I'm still debating whether my next car will be MT or AT. All I do is commute really. I have a bike for when I just want to have fun...
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Jul 22, 2006
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^
triptronic is a joke. I tried it on a Mazda6 and it would automatically shift up and down so you don't damage the car
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Mar 24, 2004
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AnotherCanuck wrote:
Mar 4th, 2013 8:53 pm
Question: If most of the fuel economy from manual transmissions comes from being able to select a better gear, would tiptronic ("manumatic") be considered just as efficient in that regard?

I'm still debating whether my next car will be MT or AT. All I do is commute really. I have a bike for when I just want to have fun...
Drivetrain losses in an auto are typically higher due to the torque converter.

However the gearing in an auto may be less aggressive.
Sr. Member
Apr 29, 2004
676 posts
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Oakville
- Keep downshifting (at least to 3rd gear, if not 2nd gear) every chance you can. e.g. approaching to a stop/red light
- Next, heel-and-toe (brake/downshift to 2nd when turning right at a green light). Though it's not necessary in every day driving, but it's one of the fun thing you can do with the car

It is going to take time and hopefully minimum clutch wear to perfect these techniques. Once you nail them down,you'll enjoy much more driving the car, and feeling the car is an extension of your body on the road.

For those who want to learn driving a manual car and still consider about buying one versus an auto. You still don't have what it takes to learn. For someone who truly wants to learn to drive a manual transmission - there is no "considering" about transmissions, but only the choice of colour.
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Jan 30, 2013
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Dump the clutch at 5000 rpm
mr_raider wrote:
Jul 24th, 2013 2:31 pm
I think the inner douchiness will come out and override cultural superstitions when comes time to sign the lease.
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ehsu wrote:
Mar 4th, 2013 11:09 pm
- Keep downshifting (at least to 3rd gear, if not 2nd gear) every chance you can. e.g. approaching to a stop/red light
- Next, heel-and-toe (brake/downshift to 2nd when turning right at a green light). Though it's not necessary in every day driving, but it's one of the fun thing you can do with the car

It is going to take time and hopefully minimum clutch wear to perfect these techniques. Once you nail them down,you'll enjoy much more driving the car, and feeling the car is an extension of your body on the road.

For those who want to learn driving a manual car and still consider about buying one versus an auto. You still don't have what it takes to learn. For someone who truly wants to learn to drive a manual transmission - there is no "considering" about transmissions, but only the choice of colour.
:rolleyes:

I'm about to drop a big chunk of change on my first new car, I'm pretty sure it's reasonable to be worried about whether or not a manual transmission is right for me. I adjusted very quickly to the manual transmission on my motorcycle, but I don't ride it in heavy traffic. Considering I'm buying this car as my daily commuter, I'm simply wondering if it's worth getting the manual.
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Apr 8, 2009
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How i save gas:

EPA rates my car at 12.37L/100km Combined
My last tank i drove it around Toronto locally and 1 round trip to Waterloo and got ~9.2L/100km (used about 58 liters)

Pulse and glide 8D

On the highway (flat road):
1. WOT short shift up to 6th asap.
2. Speed up to 115-120 in 6th
3. Clutch in, go to neutral
4. coast til ~90km/h, the repeat

On an incline(uphill):
1. stop accelerating.
2. coast down to 100km/hr (let this be max speed)
3. apply 25% throttle or less to maintain speed OR let speed drop slowly.
4. repeat regular pulse and glide.

Local: Pulse and glide between 80-55

no speeding tickets yet in my manual car :)
[OP]
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Saibot wrote:
Mar 5th, 2013 2:23 am
How i save gas:

EPA rates my car at 12.37L/100km Combined
My last tank i drove it around Toronto locally and 1 round trip to Waterloo and got ~9.2L/100km (used about 58 liters)

Pulse and glide 8D

On the highway (flat road):
1. WOT short shift up to 6th asap.
2. Speed up to 115-120 in 6th
3. Clutch in, go to neutral
4. coast til ~90km/h, the repeat

On an incline(uphill):
1. stop accelerating.
2. coast down to 100km/hr (let this be max speed)
3. apply 25% throttle or less to maintain speed OR let speed drop slowly.
4. repeat regular pulse and glide.

Local: Pulse and glide between 80-55

no speeding tickets yet in my manual car :)
Is Wide Open Throttle short shifting exactly what it sounds like? Punch it and shift really fast before the RPMs get too high?

If you're going WOT from say 50-120km/h, wouldn't that use more fuel than gradually accelerating with moderate acceleration?
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Supercooled wrote:
Mar 5th, 2013 1:30 pm
Is Wide Open Throttle short shifting exactly what it sounds like? Punch it and shift really fast before the RPMs get too high?

If you're going WOT from say 50-120km/h, wouldn't that use more fuel than gradually accelerating with moderate acceleration?
Engine is most efficient under load.
IE, the harder the engine is working to push your car, the more efficent it is. If you "gradually accelerate" you're barely putting any load on your engine.

http://www.autospeed.com/cms/article.html?&A=112611 (comparison of 25% throttle vs 80-100% throttle)
Sr. Member
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Sep 25, 2009
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Mississauga
Good luck with keeping control on car without clutch engaged. Small flick and you are flying sidewide.
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Oct 11, 2006
947 posts
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Toronto
Saibot wrote:
Mar 5th, 2013 2:23 am

On the highway (flat road):
1. WOT short shift up to 6th asap.
2. Speed up to 115-120 in 6th
3. Clutch in, go to neutral
4. coast til ~90km/h, the repeat
The clutch wear is so not worth it for the minimal gas saving, let alone the safety concern for going to neutral when driving on a highway.

Sacrificing your evasive maneuver ability during an emergency situation will result a dead RFDer trying to save some pretty pennies.

Not sure if you are trolling... :facepalm:
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Mar 24, 2004
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Saibot wrote:
Mar 5th, 2013 2:23 am
How i save gas:

EPA rates my car at 12.37L/100km Combined
My last tank i drove it around Toronto locally and 1 round trip to Waterloo and got ~9.2L/100km (used about 58 liters)

Pulse and glide 8D

On the highway (flat road):
1. WOT short shift up to 6th asap.
2. Speed up to 115-120 in 6th
3. Clutch in, go to neutral
4. coast til ~90km/h, the repeat

On an incline(uphill):
1. stop accelerating.
2. coast down to 100km/hr (let this be max speed)
3. apply 25% throttle or less to maintain speed OR let speed drop slowly.
4. repeat regular pulse and glide.

Local: Pulse and glide between 80-55

no speeding tickets yet in my manual car :)
Why not keep it in gear, instead of go to Neutral? On modern EFI cars, there is little to no fuel consumption when throttle is closed.
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Jun 1, 2008
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Cambridge, ON/Guelph…
when approaching a traffic light or slowing down in general try to leave the car in gear. This will help to slow you down as well as saving gas. What happens in the backend is that the momentum of your wheels will be driving the engine and not your fuel. If you leave it in neutral, then your engine is still working to keep it at idle.
Sr. Member
Sep 4, 2007
777 posts
202 upvotes
Question about shifting to neutral for whatever reasons:
Is it necessary to depress clutch when shifting to neutral? I've seen my friend push the stick to neutral without stepping on clutch and car seems fine, no grinding, etc. Is this even a 'technique'?
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2006
6346 posts
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Ya, you can go out of gear without using the clutch, but rarely into gear. There is a "sweet spot" in every manual transmission that will allow shifting from gear to gear without using the clutch.

In all the Sunfires/Cavaliers , it was 15, 30, 50 and 65, and 80 kms to get through all five gears without using the clutch.

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