Students

Medical School acceptance rate

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 17th, 2017 8:36 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 26, 2016
36 posts
2 upvotes

Medical School acceptance rate

Hi,

I graduated with a B.Sc in Biochemistry. Got a B+ cGPA. Is it out of the question to apply to medical school? Anyone have an idea of what % of applicants actually get in? I've heard it's extremely difficult.

Thanks
21 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Oct 3, 2006
10180 posts
610 upvotes
Toronto
There's a bunch of people with As with good MCATs that don't get in. Your chances are not zero, but it's next to none.
Sr. Member
Jun 15, 2012
709 posts
48 upvotes
MB
Honestly I don't get this. Paucity of medical doctors and very few places offered in medical schools.
For instance university of Saskatchewan 800 applications but only 100 placements available annually.
Simply double or triple educational quotas.

I would say make sure you have high mcat and apply.
"I will tell you how to become rich. Close the doors. Be fearful when others are greedy. Be greedy when others are fearful."
- Warren Buffett
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2014
1889 posts
434 upvotes
It's not just MCAT. Some school doesn't look at MCAT, some just looks at one component of the whole test, some just uses MCAT scores as markers. You need GPA, ECs (TA, volunteers, researches, publishing), MCAT/CASPER, application essays, good reference letters and ultimately lots of luck. Med school is something you need to prepare when you started undergrad - the right program or right school, building up your ECs, protecting your GPA (3.90 or higher will give you better chance). Once you get all that and manage to get an interview, then your chances will be higher, ~40% on getting acceptance. Applying is also expensive so don't waste money if you don't think you have a chance. Sometime, people would do a Master degree to improve GPA & chances. You also need a backup plan in the event you can't get into Med (e.g. Dentistry, pharmacist, etc) as I heard the BofSc is pretty useless by itself
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 8, 2008
3465 posts
954 upvotes
Toronto
ronnielarmond wrote:
Feb 12th, 2017 1:21 pm
Hi,

I graduated with a B.Sc in Biochemistry. Got a B+ cGPA. Is it out of the question to apply to medical school? Anyone have an idea of what % of applicants actually get in? I've heard it's extremely difficult.

Thanks
Their acceptance rates and average cGPAs are usually listed on their websites.
Member
Aug 17, 2008
475 posts
8 upvotes
Hate to break it to you, but a B+ GPA won't even get you through the screening system. I know at Queen's they have a computer that looks through the marks for individuals that have a minimum of at least a 3.85 cGPA. If you don't, you're automatically disqualified before they even look at your statement, references, CV, MCAT etc.

Many people that apply to med school have planned years ahead of time (publications, practice, protecting your GPA etc.). You're not going to get in if you've just NOW decided that you want to apply to med school (unless you're a prodigal genius)

Like the first poster said, you're chances are not zero, but you have a better chance of winning a small lottery prize.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jul 27, 2006
10445 posts
542 upvotes
If you are actually serious about medicine, try overseas like the Caribbean, you may still have a shot with good MCAT scores.
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2014
1889 posts
434 upvotes
thechampion116 wrote:
Feb 13th, 2017 12:56 pm
If you are actually serious about medicine, try overseas like the Caribbean, you may still have a shot with good MCAT scores.
true. their MCAT/GPA requirements lower than those in Canada but it will be very expensive. I knew someone mortgaged their house so their kid can go to med school there. Also there is a very high chance that you won't be able to come back to Canada for residency or practice after you finish
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 26, 2007
3369 posts
235 upvotes
OP, don't let anyone discourage you.
I don't believe in false hopes but you'll never know until you apply
may be you have experience other applicants don't.
i wouldn't bother putting too much weight in hearsay and average GPA is just that, an average.

that said, make sure this is what you want to do. It's a minimum 7-8 years commitment and not a walk in the park esp in residency. Many will burn-out.
Russell wrote:
Sep 10th, 2011 12:29 pm
We come here looking for deals. We use the savings on the things we buy to justify buying more things, thus filling our homes with tons of unnecessary consumer products. Such is the key to happiness.

Newbie
Apr 11, 2016
69 posts
10 upvotes
With your average, you have a really low chance of getting into medical school in Canada. However, there are some schools that look at your two best years, so if you pulled off a 3.8ish for those two years, then it would be worth applying to those schools ...

Whatever you do, DO NOT GO TO A CARIBBEAN MD SCHOOL. Although it is a lot easier to get into those schools, MANY drop out and it is quite hard to land a residency position as a IMG (FMG?). You will literally have to ace your Step 1 to at least have a fighting chance against students from Canadian/US MD schools. Match rate is about a 54% for IMG (FMG?), while it is almost guaranteed if you go to school in Canada/US (~ 97%). If you do not end up matching, you can try applying again, but odds are less (on top of being from a Carribean school as well). You can end up graduating as a MD without matching, but you will likely not be a working physician, which will leave you with tons of debt if you take out loans.
Jr. Member
Jul 20, 2009
176 posts
173 upvotes
KPanOpto wrote:
Feb 14th, 2017 1:18 pm
With your average, you have a really low chance of getting into medical school in Canada. However, there are some schools that look at your two best years, so if you pulled off a 3.8ish for those two years, then it would be worth applying to those schools ...

Whatever you do, DO NOT GO TO A CARIBBEAN MD SCHOOL. Although it is a lot easier to get into those schools, MANY drop out and it is quite hard to land a residency position as a IMG (FMG?). You will literally have to ace your Step 1 to at least have a fighting chance against students from Canadian/US MD schools. Match rate is about a 54% for IMG (FMG?), while it is almost guaranteed if you go to school in Canada/US (~ 97%). If you do not end up matching, you can try applying again, but odds are less (on top of being from a Carribean school as well). You can end up graduating as a MD without matching, but you will likely not be a working physician, which will leave you with tons of debt if you take out loans.
I went to a Caribbean school and am on the verge of completing my residency in Canada. I wouldn't put a blanket disclaimer to simply not go, but would agree that it's a lot tougher than most people realize to make it through and succeed. With a B+ you might have an outside shot in Canada if you can really shore up the rest of your application, perhaps consider a Masters and/or a PhD...and move to another province if you're in Ontario haha.

If you have no interest in doing further training or still don't think you'll ever get in, you can consider going abroad. If you're in a good Caribbean school (most of them are crap) and you make it through with no problems, the chances of you matching are still quite reasonable. You'll most likely end up in primary care in the States because of how hard it is to match in Canada as an IMG. It's certainly not easy to match in the US either...you're competing against Americans who have visas whereas you'll need a visa to do your residency there...simply, you'll have to be better than your fellow American to have a shot.

If you want more info, feel free to send me a PM. Don't give up on your dreams if it's really want you want to do, but make sure you're fully committed if you go down the international route.
Newbie
Nov 2, 2016
27 posts
oilerfan4lyfe wrote:
Mar 14th, 2017 4:11 pm
I went to a Caribbean school and am on the verge of completing my residency in Canada. I wouldn't put a blanket disclaimer to simply not go, but would agree that it's a lot tougher than most people realize to make it through and succeed. With a B+ you might have an outside shot in Canada if you can really shore up the rest of your application, perhaps consider a Masters and/or a PhD...and move to another province if you're in Ontario haha.

If you have no interest in doing further training or still don't think you'll ever get in, you can consider going abroad. If you're in a good Caribbean school (most of them are crap) and you make it through with no problems, the chances of you matching are still quite reasonable. You'll most likely end up in primary care in the States because of how hard it is to match in Canada as an IMG. It's certainly not easy to match in the US either...you're competing against Americans who have visas whereas you'll need a visa to do your residency there...simply, you'll have to be better than your fellow American to have a shot.

If you want more info, feel free to send me a PM. Don't give up on your dreams if it's really want you want to do, but make sure you're fully committed if you go down the international route.
This. I admire your dedication! Another consideration is that it's getting more and more difficult every year to match back to Canada/US as an international medical graduate. And a big emphasis on making sure you're fully committed to following your dream if you're going international. The path is much more difficult, riddled with much more uncertainty, and in some cases is even longer than if you had just stayed in Canada. A lot of the residency positions for IMGs have a pesky return of service contract stuck on them where you are required to work in an underserviced community for 5 or so years.
Sr. Member
Sep 29, 2008
604 posts
67 upvotes
Mississauga
I honestly know at least 15 people who couldn't get into medical school in Canada but went to the Caribbean and are now doing residency or practicing in US and Canada. I don't know how much easier it is to get into Caribbean schools but everyone seems to be going there, and it does seem to work. A lot of these people were not outstanding students at all, neither were they from well off families.

Top