Beauty & Wellness

[Merged] laser eye surgery

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 16th, 2017 3:25 pm

Poll: Mid twenties a good age to get it done?

  • Total votes: 196. You have voted on this poll.
Yes
 
100
51%
No
 
29
15%
Pizza is yummy
 
67
34%
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Oct 1, 2011
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I'm doing all right with the 2-3 capsules of Jamieson Select so far (down from 4 caps/day.)

I like to take them regularly anyway, I used to take 2 caps/day for general health.
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Oct 3, 2006
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Question to burnt89 and peanutz if you guys don't mind me asking, what were your pre-op prescriptions?
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burnt69 wrote:
Apr 27th, 2017 11:16 pm
Uhhh, I'm roughly 2 weeks off my Omega-3 supplements and my night vision when I went out driving tonight has gone totally to hell. :(.

Guess there's a visit to the drugstore in my schedule tomorrow.
How long are you supposed to keep taking them?
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-5.50 and -5.75 from the optometrist (1.00 astigmatism in both eyes as well); -5.25 in both eyes at PLEC's own office.
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Oct 6, 2015
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
May 3rd, 2017 5:28 pm
Question to burnt89 and peanutz if you guys don't mind me asking, what were your pre-op prescriptions?
I was advised to stay away from non-prescribed eyedrops (especially VISINE), and to take Omega-3 fish oil supplements at 4000mg daily (4 capsules).

I was also advised to buy Tylenol (acetimophen) and Advil (ibuprofen). I ended up taking 500mg Extra Strength Tylenols and Aleve (naproxen) tablets with me to Vancouver that were around the house that I obtained after a relative passed away. But nothing you can't easily buy from a drugstore.

The Aleve (naproxen) basically is the same thing as Advil (ibuprofen), but lasts longer. No other major difference really.

I think @peanutz said he/she had the post-op prescriptions faxed to the pharmacy before-hand to save a few bucks locally. FML and Betoptic S. I think it was $60 at No Frills on W. Broadway for both. You only need 2 bottles of FML for the standard dosing regime they give you post-surgery as a -5.5 or so.

They give you a prescription for a narcotic pain reliever, and a sleeping pill. I didn't need these and didn't fill the provided prescription for them. A recent presentation given by PLEC claims that out of 765 cases, only 11 actually needed to use the narcotic pain reliever:

https://members.optometrists.bc.ca/BCAO ... lation.pdf

(page 26)
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
May 3rd, 2017 5:29 pm
How long are you supposed to keep taking them?
2 months at the minimum, but really, as long as you need. In my case, it may very well be 'forever'. But I was trending towards dry eyes even before surgery, and was on the borderline of dryness when I was fitted with contact lenses at the age of 16. Its a common problem as you get older, but I already had signs as a teenager :(.
Question to burnt89 and peanutz if you guys don't mind me asking, what were your pre-op prescriptions?
Basically identical to peanutz.

Oh darn, do you mean pre-op prescriptions for the surgery, or pre-op prescriptions, ie: refractions, for eyeglasses? Lol. Sorry I just got back from a long bike ride and my mind (but not vision!) is kinda blurry, lol.
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I meant your prescription for glasses. Anyways, it doesn't seem very appealing anymore if you have to be kept on meds for the rest of your life to maintain your vision. Is that the norm or just you? I would be ok with being on medication for a few months until the vision fully recovers and stabilizes, but not forever.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
May 3rd, 2017 8:23 pm
I meant your prescription for glasses. Anyways, it doesn't seem very appealing anymore if you have to be kept on meds for the rest of your life to maintain your vision. Is that the norm or just you? I would be ok with being on medication for a few months until the vision fully recovers and stabilizes, but not forever.
I'm hoping the dry eyes will get better, and they say it can take a year or two for a full recovery to be made after PRK. In the first month or two, I definitely required artificial tears a few times daily in addition to the Omega-3 capsules and overnight lubricants. Now I am down to just taking the Omega-3 capsules orally, and using the overnight lubricants (no artificial tear use!). So things are getting better, just not as fast as I had hoped.

A bottle of 200 Omega-3 capsules cost me $10 at the drugstore the other day. Fish oil. Its really not that big of a deal and helps keep your skin soft too.

I'll probably try the Omega-3 taper like @peanutz is doing. 3 capsules, then 2 capsules, etc., into the summer. I'm running out of overnight lube, so I'll probably stop that too and see how I am doing. There's really not a set algorithm, but since I had borderline pre-existing dry eye problems, its no surprise that its taking me longer to fully stabilize coming off of the lubricants and drops.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
May 3rd, 2017 8:23 pm
I meant your prescription for glasses. Anyways, it doesn't seem very appealing anymore if you have to be kept on meds for the rest of your life to maintain your vision. Is that the norm or just you? I would be ok with being on medication for a few months until the vision fully recovers and stabilizes, but not forever.
What burnt69 says is about the same as I've read in the literature--I heard 1-2 years for "full recovery", including nerve regeneration, etc. that help to restimulate normal tear production. In terms of functioning and comfort, I feel healed and I sometimes rub my eyes a bit (habit!) with no consequence. Face With Stuck-out Tongue And Tightly-closed Eyes

LASIK was said to possibly take 5-6 years for nerve regeneration, or never...

The Omega-3's are only recommended for 3-6 months in the post-recovery, but since I have atopic dermatitis/eczema anyway, and for general health, I intend to stay on it long-term for 2 capsules/day. I haven't noticed any changes to my eye lubrication depending on the capsules, but I will say that for whatever reason, my left eye is a little dryer than the right; sometimes I wake up with it 'sticking' (nonpainfully) a bit.

It's uncertain how long and how often lubricant eye drops will be needed. I think I'm doing 3-4 drops a day per eye, not because I feel the need to, but because I think I should--otherwise, I'd probably do drops in the morning and before bed only. I don't use the ointments at all anymore because I really dislike them.

I'm 200% happy I made this choice. I feel so free without having to constantly wear glasses to see. Even showering and being able to look around, locate a bottle of shampoo or look at the ceiling, etc. is a simple joy, hehe.

My brother looks a LOT better without his glasses, like a more active/outgoing person now, purely on a perceptions basis.

It's up to you if potentially using eye drops once or twice a day long term would bother you.
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peanutz wrote:
May 3rd, 2017 11:09 pm
I'm 200% happy I made this choice. I feel so free without having to constantly wear glasses to see. Even showering and being able to look around, locate a bottle of shampoo or look at the ceiling, etc. is a simple joy, hehe.
LOL! It took me a few weeks to get used to seeing myself naked after a shower, in full high-definition. Kinda horrifying! Makes me want to exercise more!
My brother looks a LOT better without his glasses, like a more active/outgoing person now, purely on a perceptions basis.
Yeah I'm more confident that I can go out somewhere and not have to leave because my contact lenses need adjustment. However, it seems to have made my insomnia a bit worse as taking out the contact lenses was a sort of 'finish' to my day, like closure. But still glad I done it. I still catch myself trying to find my contact lens case and solution when going to bed, to take out my lenses! As though I'm missing something! Except that I don't have any!

I gotta say when travelling, it was so nice to be able to just go to sleep in the car or plane, and not worry about waking up with dry eyes and lenses. I never really was able to sleep in contact prior, so sleeping in a car or a plane, with inability to wash one's hands (airplane washrooms are disgusting!) was off limits.
It's up to you if potentially using eye drops once or twice a day long term would bother you.
Yeah I don't use eye drops at all anymore. Just overnight lube + the Omega 3 capsules. I tried going back on the drops briefly, but they didn't provide much relief from the optical quality problems I was having. Going back on Omega-3 made a dramatic difference and I bet I'm seeing 20/15 now instead of the 20/25 I was tested at when I was off the capsules and things were getting dry.
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Oct 6, 2015
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CCCCCCBBBBBB wrote:
May 6th, 2017 9:31 pm
Which laser eye center in Vancouver did the most people go?
There's people in this thread who have gone to pretty much all of them. The big brand-name, high volume centers include Pacific Laser, Coal Harbor, London, LASIK MD, and King LASIK.

My posts specifically pertain to my personal experience with Pacific Laser Eye Center on W. Broadway and Hemlock. Most posters to this thread speak highly of the particular clinic that they went to, whichever it may have been. Some use better lasers than others, some have a different approach to after-care than others, some have higher (or lower) fees. My impression gained from the thread and online reviews is that no single surgeon is 'bad', but some have better equipment and treatment methods than others, for certain specific situations.
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Long time follower of this thread. Thinking about getting SmartSurface PRK done. I have a couple of concerns though.

1. Why has it not been approved in the US (FDA)? This concerns me.

2. I am hesitant to use newer technologies as we really don't know what the long term results/side affects are.
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Sheek wrote:
May 13th, 2017 2:29 pm
Long time follower of this thread. Thinking about getting SmartSurface PRK done. I have a couple of concerns though.

1. Why has it not been approved in the US (FDA)? This concerns me.

2. I am hesitant to use newer technologies as we really don't know what the long term results/side affects are.
1. I can only guess. But the FDA is notorious for being extremely slow--and not necessarily because of safety concerns. They have a lot of people/companies with $$$ interests who are able to lobby and push them around. Personally, I am more assured by the fact that trans-PRK with SmartSurface is approved in a number of countries that are also known for being medically judicious. I am also suspicious of the fact that the FDA approved, and never issued cautions, on laser eye surgeries of the past when it was REALLY a lot riskier and had more noise about problems/aggressive, misleading marketing strategies, etc.

2. From a mechanical standpoint, PRK is an older and simpler surgery than LASIK. It's true that the trans-epithelial laser version of PRK is newer (along with the SmartSurface enhancement), but I personally don't think that trans-PRK introduces much material difference into the equation in terms of risks, which is why I thought the benefit vs. risk was worth it. (Old PRK = removal of epithelium with mechanical brush or alcohol, then laser zapping the cornea; trans-PRK is just laser through epithelium + cornea.)

I agree with you in being cautious with newer technologies. With the bigger context, laser eye surgeries overall are still quite new. We still do not have a large sample of patients who had it done in their 20's to 40's (in the 1990's) to know how they fare in their 70's and beyond.

I chose transPRK because it combines the better mechanical stability of PRK (vs. LASIK), a simpler surgical process than older PRK (with evidence of less-painful/quicker initial recovery), and I think there are at least some people in their 40's to 60's today who had PRK in the 1990's to attest to its longevity and safety...as far as we can currently tell.
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Does Lasik also require post-op medication/supplements like Omega-3 to be taken for months, if not years just like PRK?

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