Beauty & Wellness

[Merged] laser eye surgery

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 17th, 2017 6:33 pm

Poll: Mid twenties a good age to get it done?

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Yes
 
95
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No
 
27
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Pizza is yummy
 
63
34%
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@lynn24 I also flew out the 1 day after surgery. Air pressure was a non-factor; the dry environment is a bit more worry, so keep your eyes lubricated on the plane.

My flight was comfortable, but I have been a frequent traveler for the past 1.5 years so maybe I was just used to it. Also, for the flight back, I ticked off a box saying I would be "vision impaired" so it seems that they auto-placed me in the front row of the economy section with the slightly extra leg room. I didn't do it on purpose, but if you are tall/long-legged that might make it more comfy for you to access your drops.

My optometrist only charges me $70 per visit, but the clinic seems to be a happy, full practice. I think they have a referral program with TLC in Toronto, too.

@Aznsilvrboy I'm glad you're experiencing some improvements. I had the ghosting/slight distance blur for about 2 months. It's hard to explain what it looks like...my vision was clear but I could see a distant fuzziness when reading small lettering from a distance. One of my eyes was healed more and had less ghosting, whereas the other was healing a bit slower, so I could tell what my vision should look like over time.

Yes, I did get the blurry/focus thing during healing. During my optometrist visits, I would blink, wait a few seconds for eye to adjust, before reading off the letters. This will also improve.

As my eyes were/are still slightly dry time to time, my vision was/is also *clearest* right after I have instilled the lubricant drops.
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So I took an extra drop of Acuvail in each eye instead of the lubricant because I didn't check carefully. The vials look almost identical except the red sticker. Although I realized pretty quickly, but it was too late. I kind of panicked and just quickly put the lubricant drops right after in hopes of "diluting" it. Now I'm pretty worried since Acuvail seems to have some pretty terrible side effects and extra doses are highly advised against. :(
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2017 2:44 am
So I took an extra drop of Acuvail in each eye instead of the lubricant because I didn't check carefully. The vials look almost identical except the red sticker. Although I realized pretty quickly, but it was too late. I kind of panicked and just quickly put the lubricant drops right after in hopes of "diluting" it. Now I'm pretty worried since Acuvail seems to have some pretty terrible side effects and extra doses are highly advised against. :(
I think you'll be OK. Diluting it with regular drops was a smart thing to do.

You should sequester all old/used/empty vials separate from the fresh ones. If you want to be diligent, you return the Acuvail to a pharmacy so they can dispose of it properly...but I'm sure lots of people just toss it into the garbage.

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... y_patients
Ketorolac 0.4% ophthalmic solution is safe and effective in reducing ocular pain when used 4 times daily for up to 4 days post PRK.
This study found the same active ingredient eyedrop safe, used for 4 days after PRK. You only used the Acuvail one odd time after the prescribed 2-day period (Acuvail is a different formulation vs. the one in the study, but same active ingredient.)

The listed side effects are more likely in frequent and/or longer-term use, like 1-2 weeks straight, such as cataract surgery patients.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2017 2:44 am
So I took an extra drop of Acuvail in each eye instead of the lubricant because I didn't check carefully. The vials look almost identical except the red sticker. Although I realized pretty quickly, but it was too late. I kind of panicked and just quickly put the lubricant drops right after in hopes of "diluting" it. Now I'm pretty worried since Acuvail seems to have some pretty terrible side effects and extra doses are highly advised against. :(
Hmmm. Taking extra Acuvail isn't the end of the world. Its a NSAID medication. You were only given a vial or two, which should have been taken in the first couple days of the procedure to reduce pain. Surprised you have any left.

Its the anesthetic drops, with drug names ending with "-caine" (ie: tetracaine, proporacaine, Alcaine, etc.) , that seriously cause problems with healing and can severely damage the cornea if overused. These are given by many PRK surgeons, often in a diluted form, for at-home patient use, but fortunately transPRK/SmartSurfACE pain is so rare that PLEC, at least, didn't give them to us.*

*Maybe* the fact that you still have some left over and didn't use them up fully on the first day or two was the source of your slightly delayed healing and swelling. *Maybe*. So many variables, hard to tell. But its not going to affect your final outcome.

* during my research, I came across the case of a medical doctor who had PRK and self-prescribed (with her own prescription pad, filled at a pharmacy, without knowledge/approval of the surgeon), tetracaine drops for her recovery. She ended up going blind in the eye due to abuse of such drops!!!!
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Regarding the effects of Acuvail, I was told by both Dr. Lin and my optometrist that it slows healing. but I'm glad to report that the extra drops of Acuvail didn't seem to have any noticeable negative effects on my vision after I woke up the next day. Now on the 11th day, it's kind of hard to notice daily improvements now that my vision is at about a self-estimated 80% (more or less same as yesterday). There's still some slight ghosting, and the blur until focused issue I mentioned earlier. I figure I'm probably good enough to drive now, although I have not attempted to do so yet. I'll probably wait until my optometrist gives me the thumbs up, hopefully on this coming Friday.
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So my left eye regressed and has noticeably more ghosting/blur than a few days ago while my right eye is now pretty good. Combined, I have decent, albeit slightly blurry vision. @peanutz @burnt69 Did you guys experience any regression/fluctuation like this during your recovery process? Note that I'm already on my 11th day post-op.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 6:15 pm
So my left eye regressed and has noticeably more ghosting/blur than a few days ago while my right eye is now pretty good. Combined, I have decent, albeit slightly blurry vision. @peanutz @burnt69 Did you guys experience any regression/fluctuation like this during your recovery process? Note that I'm already on my 11th day post-op.
Yeah. Lots of fluctuations, especially if you read or use computers a lot. But over time it'll get better and better. Even 6 months out I'm still noticing small changes.
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@Aznsilvrboy I didn't notice, but I read other bloggers' PRK experience posts and many of them mentioned it. Honestly, I wasn't looking for it, you'll have to be patient for the medium-term visual healing phase until it mostly stabilizes in 2-3 months. And then apparently even finer changes will occur from 3-6 months.

Your corneal nerves, tear production, etc. are even longer-term, around 2 years' healing time.
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@burnt69 @peanutz By the way, did you guys wear sunglasses when you went out at night? I'm asking because on the eye drops schedule, it says to wear protective sunglasses outdoors (not during the day only) for 3 months after surgery. Since the moon also reflects the sun's light, there's also some UV light, but I'm not sure if it's significant enough to warrant sunglasses.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 11:55 pm
@burnt69 @peanutz By the way, did you guys wear sunglasses when you went out at night? I'm asking because on the eye drops schedule, it says to wear protective sunglasses outdoors (not during the day only) for 3 months after surgery. Since the moon also reflects the sun's light, there's also some UV light, but I'm not sure if it's significant enough to warrant sunglasses.
LOL no. I'm not laughing at you, I just think that's kind of a cute thought. I don't think moon-reflected sunlight is clinically relevant, especially at our latitude.

Umm... I just check the UV rating on a weather website :) If it's a rating of 0 or 1, then I skip the sunglasses. If not...then I put them on. For the 3-months post-PRK put them on in all UV conditions except "0 UV"...mostly because I won't know if it could trigger haze or some other UV-damage.

3 months is the minimum. I would suggest you wear sunglasses when outdoors most of the time, even past the 3-month mark, unless it's very cloudy and it's fall/winter.

I have read of cases where people would get very late post-PRK haze, like 12 months after surgery. It tended to be after a trip to a very sunny location, closer to the equator. If I can find the link again, I will post it. You need to take care of your eyes for life--the cornea is now thinner, and "regular" people have to, as well.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 11:55 pm
@burnt69 @peanutz By the way, did you guys wear sunglasses when you went out at night? I'm asking because on the eye drops schedule, it says to wear protective sunglasses outdoors (not during the day only) for 3 months after surgery. Since the moon also reflects the sun's light, there's also some UV light, but I'm not sure if it's significant enough to warrant sunglasses.
I was terribly light sensitive pre-surgery, and the surgery actually reduced my light sensitivity by getting rid of my astigmatism which was causing much of it. That said, I wear the sunglasses outdoors, not only to protect against UV, but also to prevent wind from causing dryness. Also when riding my bike or driving the car without air conditioning, to keep the bugs out of my eyes.
You need to take care of your eyes for life--the cornea is now thinner
Sunlight initially may cause more regression (as well as the dreaded haze). As time goes on, some UV might be beneficial to promote cross-linking of the cornea and reduce regression (but obviously you wouldn't want too much out of fear of cataracts, etc.). I think the instructions given, which are 6 months of aggressive use of UV protection (I think my sheets said 6 months, not 3, but maybe I'm wrong!) is a good middle ground. I'm not about to disagree with a Dr. who has been treating these cases for 30 years and gives advice along those lines. Haze is a real PITA to get rid of if it occurs and doesn't naturally resolve, BTW.

So don't fear going out to, for instance, dinner in the early evening on a patio, then a club when its dark, leaving your sunglasses at home. Minor amounts of exposure aren't going to hurt you. But you wouldn't want to go to a beach in the Carribean in the morning, as I did in much of my recovery period, and stay there all day without wearing protection all the time.

As far as the moon goes, I'm sure the UV radiation flux density from that is negligible.
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Just got back from 2 week post-op optometrist appointment. She said I was 20/25 in both eyes with what seemed like a little bit of astigmatism (0.25) in the left eye, most likely due to the rougher epithelium and slightly more haze compared to the right eye. My left eye is also apparently drier. Definitely good enough to go back to work already. So I guess I'll be going back to work on Monday. I think I am happy with the results so far. I guess I was just freaked out a bit in the first few days because the thought of eye surgery gone wrong was scary.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 4th, 2017 5:55 pm
I think I am happy with the results so far. I guess I was just freaked out a bit in the first few days because the thought of eye surgery gone wrong was scary.
Great! Yeah those first few weeks are pretty doubtful... So, so glad I got PRK. I fell off my bike and gave myself a black eye on my right eye as my head hit the pavement roughly 4 weeks ago (Dr. said I had a mild concussion, and only recently did the headaches stop), and on my left eye this evening, I was twirling my keys on a lanyard and actually ended up smacking my left eye pretty hard. So 2 incidents, not even 7 months after my procedure, in which there would have been a serious risk of LASIK flap dislocation. And I still have quite a number of years to live (I hope!). So such a burden off my mind not having to worry about that as I am a pretty active person (50km on the bike every day in the summer pretty much!).

I'd say the surgery, at this point, has allowed me to double the amount I'm riding. As I don't worry about my contacts drying out now. I think I've lost a tiny bit of contrast sensitivity though, so riding at night is a little bit harder, especially if there's bright lights nearby.
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burnt69 wrote:
Aug 8th, 2017 12:09 am
Great! Yeah those first few weeks are pretty doubtful... So, so glad I got PRK. I fell off my bike and gave myself a black eye on my right eye as my head hit the pavement roughly 4 weeks ago (Dr. said I had a mild concussion, and only recently did the headaches stop), and on my left eye this evening, I was twirling my keys on a lanyard and actually ended up smacking my left eye pretty hard. So 2 incidents, not even 7 months after my procedure, in which there would have been a serious risk of LASIK flap dislocation. And I still have quite a number of years to live (I hope!). So such a burden off my mind not having to worry about that as I am a pretty active person (50km on the bike every day in the summer pretty much!).

I'd say the surgery, at this point, has allowed me to double the amount I'm riding. As I don't worry about my contacts drying out now. I think I've lost a tiny bit of contrast sensitivity though, so riding at night is a little bit harder, especially if there's bright lights nearby.
My halos have reduced significantly at night as well. The only thing left is the slight astigmatism in my left eye due to the rougher epithelium and slight remaining haze. I really hope that gets resolved by the time I go back to my optometrist for my 1 month follow up in a couple of weeks.
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Aznsilvrboy wrote:
Aug 8th, 2017 1:27 pm
The only thing left is the slight astigmatism in my left eye due to the rougher epithelium and slight remaining haze.
How can you tell that you have astigmatism? Anything that shows up 'visually', or just your optometrist telling you that you have some?

Just curious. My vision looked like this at night: http://imgur.com/S28XUiy . And that completely and totally went away with the surgery. I tried toric lenses, but couldn't tolerate them, which, along with increasing contact lens intolerance, brought me to investigating my options.

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