Beauty & Wellness

[Merged] laser eye surgery

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 21st, 2018 10:33 pm

Poll: Mid twenties a good age to get it done?

  • Total votes: 210. You have voted on this poll.
Yes
 
111
53%
No
 
30
14%
Pizza is yummy
 
69
33%
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
1300 posts
677 upvotes
microsysn wrote:
Jan 17th, 2018 5:24 pm
If my prescription is -.5 and after surgery will it get more blurry preventing me from driving few days later? I saw others were able to drive after about 4 days of smart surf PRK. I know it's case specific, just wanted to have an idea. Thanks!
It definitely will become profoundly blurry on days 3 and 4, as the epithelial healing fully occludes the day-time pupil.

I drove on day 5 (ie: Monday surgery, driving on Friday), but only in a relatively small town that I was fully familiar with. Wouldn't dream of trying it in a big city or an unfamiliar area.

Figure ~2 weeks before driving in a big city, 3 weeks before driving at night safely. But everyone's experiences can vary.
Sr. Member
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Feb 23, 2004
895 posts
134 upvotes
microsysn wrote:
Jan 17th, 2018 5:24 pm
If my prescription is -.5 and after surgery will it get more blurry preventing me from driving few days later? I saw others were able to drive after about 4 days of smart surf PRK. I know it's case specific, just wanted to have an idea. Thanks!
I was -.5 at one week and started driving. Been driving every day since in downtown TO and have felt completely comfortable aside from missing a few potholes until it was too late... I wouldn't have been comfortable before the one week period.
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Feb 23, 2004
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I went to see my optometrist today (2 weeks post surgery - not required by NVISION but my optometrist wanted to see me). I am now a hazy 20/20! I'm still experiencing dry eyes which is waking me up 1-2 times per night. Definitely noticing that when I don't drink a lot of water, the following day my vision gets worse. Trying to stay as hydrated as possible now.
Newbie
Dec 1, 2017
24 posts
13 upvotes
kjs wrote:
Jan 19th, 2018 12:43 pm
I went to see my optometrist today (2 weeks post surgery - not required by NVISION but my optometrist wanted to see me). I am now a hazy 20/20! I'm still experiencing dry eyes which is waking me up 1-2 times per night. Definitely noticing that when I don't drink a lot of water, the following day my vision gets worse. Trying to stay as hydrated as possible now.
Per burnt69's suggestion, I've been using the Systene Nighttime Ointment and it's been pretty good for dry eyes at night!

I also got my 2 weeks. I'm not at 20/20, and the optometrist doesn't expect me to hit 20/20 by the end of the month, though he's confident I will in 3-6 months time. It really sucks knowing that, but after reading several Lasik dry eyes horror stories I'm kind of glad I got Smartsurface.
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Oct 6, 2015
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tgreen2017 wrote:
Jan 19th, 2018 3:56 pm
the optometrist doesn't expect me to hit 20/20 by the end of the month
With all due respect to the optometrist, you may very well be the first SmartSurfACE patient he/she has ever seen, and may not be familiar with the aspects of the treatment that make its recovery faster than a traditional PRK. And may just be extrapolating experiences with prior PRK patients to your situation. The professional communications from Dr. Machat to the optometrist may not even describe any differences in the process or recovery from "standard" PRK (Dr. Lin's materials didn't either!).

I know my own optometrist, who it definitely was her first case, was kind of flabbergasted to see me at her office, 4 days after the procedure, with perfectly functional vision, verifying my 7-day appointment with her assistants. She actually thought I was there to cancel my appointments or had swapped to LASIK at the last moment! Even after a year of follow-up, I don't think she thought there was anything unique about my case except that I was an exceptionally fast healer, and that Dr. Lin had done a great job of completely eliminating the astigmatism and hitting an identical overcorrection target in both eyes.
Newbie
Dec 1, 2017
24 posts
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burnt69 wrote:
Jan 19th, 2018 4:55 pm
With all due respect to the optometrist, you may very well be the first SmartSurfACE patient he/she has ever seen, and may not be familiar with the aspects of the treatment that make its recovery faster than a traditional PRK. And may just be extrapolating experiences with prior PRK patients to your situation. The professional communications from Dr. Machat to the optometrist may not even describe any differences in the process or recovery from "standard" PRK (Dr. Lin's materials didn't either!).

I know my own optometrist, who it definitely was her first case, was kind of flabbergasted to see me at her office, 4 days after the procedure, with perfectly functional vision, verifying my 7-day appointment with her assistants. She actually thought I was there to cancel my appointments or had swapped to LASIK at the last moment! Even after a year of follow-up, I don't think she thought there was anything unique about my case except that I was an exceptionally fast healer, and that Dr. Lin had done a great job of completely eliminating the astigmatism and hitting an identical overcorrection target in both eyes.
Unfortunately, that is not the case :( The optometrist works closely with Nvision, and one of the optometrists in the practice actually works at Nvision and recommended me Smartsurface.
On the plus side, I can read for 1-2 hours a day before my eyes are super strained! Any tips on increasing that time? I already have flux/night shade on 24/7, and wear sunglasses occasionally indoors.
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tgreen2017 wrote:
Jan 19th, 2018 5:09 pm
Unfortunately, that is not the case :( The optometrist works closely with Nvision, and one of the optometrists in the practice actually works at Nvision and recommended me Smartsurface.
On the plus side, I can read for 1-2 hours a day before my eyes are super strained! Any tips on increasing that time? I already have flux/night shade on 24/7, and wear sunglasses occasionally indoors.
Dr. Lin's communications suggested the use of (B+L) Muro 128 ointment "for reading", as it apparently contains a certain amount of salt that will draw excess moisture from the cornea. But I'm not sure how useful that would be after a few weeks. I never did try the product.

If you started as a -9, you could be quite considerably overcorrected which would affect your reading vision as well. Maybe a pair of cheap drugstore reading glasses, +1 - +1.5 or so, might help things. You should regress over the next year to a result closer to plano (0.00) or a modest overcorrection, but the significant overcorrection was problematic for me at least for the first month or two. I couldn't even read the credit card numbers to book a flight!
Member
Jun 10, 2003
286 posts
12 upvotes
So I am back, my surgery was the morning of Jan 18th. My initial prescription was -7 with a very minor astigmatism.

Personally, I felt like I overestimated the difficulty of the surgery, but underestimated the pain of recovery. The surgery was a breeze, lasting a couple minutes. Everything is happening so close to your eye that it is difficult to really tell whats going on anyways. No sweat.

For me, my eyes started watering on the way home, and continued to get worse. Thursday night I got an OK sleep, but by Friday morning the pain was noticeable. I had my post op check up and was unable to read anything on the eye chart. My optometrist noticed my pain and told me "things would be better tomorrow". He was right, but what he didn't say was that they get worse first! That night was the most painful, and I ended up getting very little sleep. The tears would constantly well up under my eyelids and create pressure on my eye, causing pain. The tears would eventually stream out down my face and wake me up. I never did end up taking the pain-killing drop, but I couldn't imagine going through that without Demerol.

By Saturday morning both my sight and the pain began to improve. My GF and I watched (her) and listened (me) to a bunch of comedy specials on Netflix. It is a great activity when only one party can see!

Today I went to have the bandage lenses removed, and that was the last item causing discomfort. Currently my vision is 20/30. My epithelium has healed with a ridge in the middle causing a bit of distortion (this is normal).

If anyone has questions on TransPRK at Nvision let me know. Thanks to everyone above for providing info prior to the surgery!
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Oct 6, 2015
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Skatanic wrote:
Jan 22nd, 2018 2:03 pm
I never did end up taking the pain-killing drop,
Do you know, by chance, what the 'pain-killing drop' was/is?
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Oct 6, 2015
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raptorsfans wrote:
Jan 22nd, 2018 2:44 pm
NVision provided Blink (https://www.justblink.com/find-your-pro ... -eye-drops) for pain killing. They called it the "comfort drop", but they said it would slow down the recovery, and said use it only when necessary.
Umm, those Blink drops look like standard run-of-the-mill preservative free drops.

Sure they didn't provide you with something else?

PLEC, for example, provided us with Acuvail (ophthalmic ketorolac/Toradol) and prescribed its use for the first 2-3 days (Toradol is the strongest NSAID available I think). Some clinics provide ophthalmic diclofenac or another NSAID drop. Dilute tetracaine can be offered as well.
Member
Nov 25, 2007
209 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto
burnt69 wrote:
Jan 22nd, 2018 2:57 pm
Umm, those Blink drops look like standard run-of-the-mill preservative free drops.

Sure they didn't provide you with something else?

PLEC, for example, provided us with Acuvail (ophthalmic ketorolac/Toradol) and prescribed its use for the first 2-3 days (Toradol is the strongest NSAID available I think). Some clinics provide ophthalmic diclofenac or another NSAID drop. Dilute tetracaine can be offered as well.
Yeah, I know, and that's exactly what I thought too. It looks like just a lubricant instead of pain killing eye drop. But that's what they gave my wife, and she didn't have any pain so didn't use it at all.
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Feb 23, 2004
895 posts
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burnt69 wrote:
Jan 22nd, 2018 2:57 pm
Umm, those Blink drops look like standard run-of-the-mill preservative free drops.

Sure they didn't provide you with something else?

PLEC, for example, provided us with Acuvail (ophthalmic ketorolac/Toradol) and prescribed its use for the first 2-3 days (Toradol is the strongest NSAID available I think). Some clinics provide ophthalmic diclofenac or another NSAID drop. Dilute tetracaine can be offered as well.
We were given Blink bottles and packaging but I was told that it was specially prepared and mixed with something else. I didn't ask what else was in it. I don't recall taking the plastic safety seal off the bottle so they must've put something else in the bottle. I used it a couple times and can definitely attest it was more than just lubricating drops.
Member
Nov 25, 2007
209 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto
kjs wrote:
Jan 22nd, 2018 3:03 pm
We were given Blink bottles and packaging but I was told that it was specially prepared and mixed with something else. I didn't ask what else was in it. I don't recall taking the plastic safety seal off the bottle so they must've put something else in the bottle. I used it a couple times and can definitely attest it was more than just lubricating drops.
Ahh...., that makes sense now. I never opened the box, and thus didn't know it was specially mixed with something else. Thanks for the clarification, kjs :).

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