Beauty & Wellness

[Merged] laser eye surgery

  • Last Updated:
  • May 25th, 2018 11:41 pm

Poll: Mid twenties a good age to get it done?

  • Total votes: 224. You have voted on this poll.
Yes
 
117
52%
No
 
32
14%
Pizza is yummy
 
75
33%
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 1, 2011
5852 posts
1170 upvotes
tornadotrick wrote:
Feb 7th, 2018 12:33 pm
Tomorrow will be 6 weeks since getting SmartSurface PRK at Nvision by Dr. Machat. Being the cautious type, I'm only doing one eye at a time. I was about -1.5 in each eye.

Everything at the clinic went great, everyone was super nice, and the procedure was super smooth. I'd say the early healing was better than expected, though I took 2 weeks off work and had a patient girlfriend administering all my eye drops...

Vision in my left eye (the one I had done) got noticeably better at around the 2 week mark. That said, improvement since then has been slow. Currently, the eye is at about 20/25 on its own. What is concerning is that it can be refracted to be better, so I may be undercorrected? Perhaps someone with more experience/knowledge can clarify, but does undercorrection improve as time goes on? My understanding is that the procedure intentionally overcorrects, and then you slide down to where you "should" be. I'm worried I've already "slid" too far.
I believe the only person you should ask this question to is your surgeon. No one else--not even another ophthalmologist--will know what kind of inputs he entered into the laser to treat your individual, unique eye.

I personally never experienced overcorrection. Not at any point in my healing did I have beyond 20/20 vision. I just had fuzziness that simply improved with time. Interestingly, I also had zero problems/changes in my near vision after the initial healing phase of 4 weeks...no major eye strain or fatigue from reading or working on computers, etc.

I do not know if you are "undercorrected" at this point, but most surgeons these days wait at least 6-12 months for the vision to stabilize before determining that a touch-up/enhancement is desired, which implies that yes, refractive power may settle and improve as part of the healing. For instance, you mentioned ghosting...the ghosting may go away through healing and therefore your eyesight may sharpen...there is also a possibility that it is an artifact of your surgery that could persist (I hope not but it's not unheard of.)

So, ask your surgeon, what his treatment goals or typical observations of his patients are like...but I think you might have to wait 3-6 months before drawing conclusions. Worrying or guessing at this point is not going to change your vision.
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Oct 6, 2015
1300 posts
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peanutz wrote:
Feb 7th, 2018 5:28 pm
I personally never experienced overcorrection. Not at any point in my healing did I have beyond 20/20 vision.
Overcorrection doesn't get you better vision any more so than putting on a pair of glasses much stronger than prescribed. If getting someone >20/20 vision was just a matter of dialing a higher number into a laser, every Dr. would do that. Correcting an eye to 0.00, or "plano", is the point at which a + lens or a - lens (ie: positive or negative addition of optical power) both cause a degradation of vision. This is why a manifest refraction involves an optometrist testing lenses iteratively until the optimal lens is found -- and the power of such lens is noted as your prescription.

But seeing that our prescriptions were similar, and we were treated on the same equipment, you probably were overcorrected, at least initially. If you're younger than me, you would've tolerated it with greater relative ease. The older you get, the harder it becomes to tolerate overcorrection. I spent a month being unable to read credit card numbers with ease during recovery. A 45-year-old might have spent 6 months in such a state. A 50-year-old probably would need reading glasses.

There's a lot of processes going on during the healing process. Cornea denuded of its epithelium produces a hyperopic shift in addition to whatever they remove to treat the myopia. The epithelium quickly regenerates, at least a thin layer does, reducing the overcorrection (edema makes it pretty much impossible to obtain a refraction, but its noteworthy that we were fitted with a +0.5 bandage contact lens for the initial recovery!). Eye dryness will have an impact on the optical power as well and will be myopic. The stroma itself "remodels", and suffers a myopic shift. And processes which are the root cause of myopia, such as axial lengthening, continue on post-surgical eyes and continue to cause regression themselves.
Last edited by burnt69 on Feb 7th, 2018 5:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Newbie
Oct 25, 2017
5 posts
4 upvotes
Ha yeahh I'm trying not to think about it too much. The ghosting I'm not so worried about- it does seem to slowly be improving- it also varies a lot, which makes me think it's not really a permanent thing. Besides, when my eyes are dry, my right eye will show some ghosting when it's on its own too!

I'm more concerned about the refraction just because I'm trying to decide when to do the other eye and trying to decide how much "evidence" might be helpful in determining if anything needs to be changed.
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Oct 6, 2015
1300 posts
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tornadotrick wrote:
Feb 7th, 2018 5:52 pm
Ha yeahh I'm trying not to think about it too much. The ghosting I'm not so worried about- it does seem to slowly be improving- it also varies a lot, which makes me think it's not really a permanent thing. Besides, when my eyes are dry, my right eye will show some ghosting when it's on its own too!

I'm more concerned about the refraction just because I'm trying to decide when to do the other eye and trying to decide how much "evidence" might be helpful in determining if anything needs to be changed.
Per my previous post, there's so many changes going on in a post-surgical eye that its really hard to know where you'll end up. This is why I was really attracted to a high-volume clinic with a surgeon who spends a lot of time working on algorithms and nomograms (fine-adjustments to the process) rather than a surgeon who maybe just does a few cases a week alongside other ophthalmological surgeries such as cataract surgeries.

Even a surgeon who gets a brand new laser, or even a new process, will have a learning curve which will involve some trial and error.

Given that you started with a very low prescription, the overall healing and stromal remodeling process could be quite different than someone with a higher prescription. Also, in some patients, particularly younger ones, accommodation can make refraction difficult especially when so very close to plano. So your -0.25 measurement may not even be reliable. As peanutz pointed out, I would probably just not worry about it, and focus (no pun intended) on the fact that you are spectacle and contact lens independent which is a great feeling and still brings a smile to my face daily despite my life generally being a mess otherwise.
Newbie
Dec 9, 2017
6 posts
tornadotrick wrote:
Feb 7th, 2018 12:33 pm
Getting one eye done has been interesting... haha I'm constantly testing the two against each other. I've noticed I actually get less halos in my left eye now. I'm still getting pretty significant ghosting in that eye though- particularly with lights on a dark background (traffic lights at night are the best example).
What's the difference between halos and ghosting?
Newbie
Feb 6, 2012
48 posts
10 upvotes
SCARBOROUGH
Those of you who tried the Hylo and Refresh Plus drops, did you notice any difference between them? I am finding using Refresh makes night and day difference when using the computer and i can see crystal clear after using Refresh, and it cost almost half the price than Hylo...
With hylo I see fuziness and weird things around text on some spots of the screen.
I think overall vision gets lot better while using Refresh drops..not sure if it's just me. (now i just hope it stays permanent after recovery time!)
Tomorrow is my 1 month checkup..will see how it goes.

Anyone have similar experience with these drops?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 23, 2004
901 posts
136 upvotes
microsysn wrote:
Feb 15th, 2018 11:13 am
Those of you who tried the Hylo and Refresh Plus drops, did you notice any difference between them? I am finding using Refresh makes night and day difference when using the computer and i can see crystal clear after using Refresh, and it cost almost half the price than Hylo...
With hylo I see fuziness and weird things around text on some spots of the screen.
I think overall vision gets lot better while using Refresh drops..not sure if it's just me. (now i just hope it stays permanent after recovery time!)
Tomorrow is my 1 month checkup..will see how it goes.

Anyone have similar experience with these drops?
I used both and didn't notice a difference aside from how light my wallet was feeling. I ended up switching to Bion Tears (preservative free) because they're significantly cheaper at Costco (48 "single use" for $18.99.) I have not noticed any significant differences between the three.
Newbie
Dec 1, 2017
26 posts
13 upvotes
I've been using https://www.amazon.ca/hydraSense-eye-drops-eyes-10ml/, and I can't really tell the difference between it and Hylo (they both use HA as an ingredient). I even A/B tested them and put one in 1 eye and the other in another eye for 24 hours, but they felt the same. Hylo does have fewer ingredients though, so not sure if that aids healing more.
Newbie
Feb 14, 2018
4 posts
Anyone here who had laser eye surgery when they were older (40s or 50s)? I am 51 and considering getting this done. I need both long and short distance correction (about -5 and +2 both eyes). I know there are a couple of options - monovision where they correct one eye for long and the other for short-sightedness or the other option (PresbyLASIK?) where I think they create different zones to achieve multifocal correction. I went through about 30 pages of this forum and everyone who posted were much younger. Just wondering if someone older can share his/her experience.
Newbie
Feb 6, 2012
48 posts
10 upvotes
SCARBOROUGH
It seems it was a one day thing...today been using Hylo and no difference compared to Refresh..maybe my vision happens to be worse when i was using Hylo like 2 days ago when using the computer. But yes all good now regardless which drop I use.

How long did you guys need to use drops after surgery to use computer? For me been using almost every hour when i use the computer as recommended by my Optometrist, otherwise texts are fuzzy and weird things (like dead pixels) around text appear. I am at 1 month mark. Guessing 1 more month to go to depend less on tear drops? Currently, with tear drops, i can see the screen perfectly. My 1 month checkup is in few hours and will update how that goes.

Thanks.

kjs wrote:
Feb 15th, 2018 11:17 am
I used both and didn't notice a difference aside from how light my wallet was feeling. I ended up switching to Bion Tears (preservative free) because they're significantly cheaper at Costco (48 "single use" for $18.99.) I have not noticed any significant differences between the three.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 23, 2004
901 posts
136 upvotes
Has anyone had any experience with tapering off FML earlier than recommended by the surgeon?

At my 1 month follow up the eye pressure in my left eye was a bit high (18). My optometrist had me come in today for a 1.5 month visit to see how my eyes were responding to tapering FML down to 3x/day. Pressure came down a bit (16) so she told me to start using it only 2x/day, despite being at 3x for only two weeks. I'm wondering what I can expect from tapering off so quickly, other than the intended result of reducing my eye pressure.
Member
Nov 25, 2007
221 posts
57 upvotes
Toronto
Saugan wrote:
Feb 15th, 2018 11:17 pm
Anyone here who had laser eye surgery when they were older (40s or 50s)? I am 51 and considering getting this done. I need both long and short distance correction (about -5 and +2 both eyes). I know there are a couple of options - monovision where they correct one eye for long and the other for short-sightedness or the other option (PresbyLASIK?) where I think they create different zones to achieve multifocal correction. I went through about 30 pages of this forum and everyone who posted were much younger. Just wondering if someone older can share his/her experience.
Hi Saugan, my wife did a SmartSurface PRK last month, and here's her pre/post surgery info:

Age: 42
Ethnic: Asian (Chinese)
Pupil Size: 6.5mm
Corneal thickness: 590 microns

Pre-Surgery Prescription

Right Eye:
S̶p̶h̶e̶r̶e̶ ̶=̶ ̶-̶0̶.̶7̶0̶0̶ Sphere = -7.00
Cyl = -0.50
Axis = 0.50
ADD = +1.25

Left Eye:
S̶p̶h̶e̶r̶e̶ ̶=̶ ̶-̶0̶.̶7̶7̶5̶ ̶ Sphere = -7.75
Cyl = -0.50
Axis = 0.90
ADD = +1.25

The doctor (not Dr. Machat) at NVision recommended her monovision (Right eye = 0, Left eye = -0.75) at the consultation appointment. I didn't like the idea of having imbalance eyes, but my wife really wanted to delay the need of reading glasses, so she took the doctor's advice and went for the monovision. I also asked our optometrist, and he also thought -0.75 is pretty mild and my wife should be OK with that.

Last Saturday she went for her "1-month" appointment (actually, it's 1.5 month after her surgery, but our schedules didn't work out, so we had to postpone her "1-month" appointment). Following is the result:

Right Eye: +0.25
Left Eye: -1.25

Her vision is now 20/30 on both eyes. She was 20/50 on her 1-week appointment. Our optometrist said the eyes might still need some time to "settle", so the numbers might still fluctuate in the next few monhts.

After the surgery, my wife had very minimal pain/dry eye/halos issues. But they were all gone after a few days. NVision recommended Refresh Plus (lubricant), so she still takes it everyday even though she has zero dry eye problem. BTW, Walmart has the best price on Refresh Plus ($13.99).

The first week back to work was challenging, and she was having difficulty looking at her computer monitors. She had no problem on anything else (ie, watching TV, cellphone etc.), but not the computer monitors (maybe she just didn't like to work, LOL!). It got better after the 1st week back to work. Her far vision is still not perfect (only 20/30 now), and she said she's probably about 85%-90% of her pre-surgery vision. Hopefully that will be improved and she'll get 20/20 or better later.

The monovision really helped her presbyopia, and she said she can now see much better on closed objects than before. Your brain might need some time (ie, a few weeks?) to do the "adjustment" on monovision. I think my wife's brain is now adapted to her monovision, and she absolutely loves it! The doctor said she could get pair of glasses for driving in the night if necessary (to help her far vision). But my wife doesn't think it's necessary (well, at least at this moment).

Hope this helps.
Last edited by raptorsfans on Feb 20th, 2018 2:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Newbie
Feb 14, 2018
4 posts
Hi raptorsfans (me too!),

Thank you so much for taking the time to write a detailed review. Your wife's prescription was pretty mild to start with. Hope she will get 20/20 vision real soon!

Would love to hear from anyone else who went through multi-focal laser correction.
Member
Nov 25, 2007
221 posts
57 upvotes
Toronto
Saugan wrote:
Feb 20th, 2018 10:32 pm
Hi raptorsfans (me too!),

Thank you so much for taking the time to write a detailed review. Your wife's prescription was pretty mild to start with. Hope she will get 20/20 vision real soon!

Would love to hear from anyone else who went through multi-focal laser correction.
Sorry, it was a typo. The pre-surgery prescription should be -7.00 & -7.75 for her right and left eyes (instead of -0.7000 & -0.775).

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