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[Merged] Windows/Doors

Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
5230 posts
2120 upvotes
Paris
nx6288 wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 10:35 am
in GTA - got a quote for 5 panel shaker door 80" height x 30" width x 3/8" for $150/door. Does that sound reasonable?
Solid or hollow? Pre-hung or slab only? Wood veneer or paintable veneer? Installed or supply only?

For a pre-hung paintable door thats probably around what a box store charges now for supply only.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
Member
Apr 21, 2016
235 posts
52 upvotes
GTA
Jerico wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 2:17 pm
Solid or hollow? Pre-hung or slab only? Wood veneer or paintable veneer? Installed or supply only?

For a pre-hung paintable door thats probably around what a box store charges now for supply only.
lost me at the 3/8"
Deal Fanatic
Dec 12, 2006
5080 posts
764 upvotes
calgary
Hey Guys,
Quick Question, our front closet doors broke so we bought some replacement ones over the weekend and when I went to replace them and measured the width and got some standard doors that were 80" high by 48" wide because my measurements were close enough to those numbers.

However when I went to go install these doors it looks like framed opening for the old doors were about 46" wide and 78" high meaning my door is both too wide and too tall for the opening, I ripped off the baseboards and noticed a couple things.

1) The height - w/o the door Jamb is equal to 80", I'm guessing maybe I mistake when they framed it? Can I bypass the door jamb and install the sliding doors directly to the door frame at the top? I think between the casing that holds the sliding doors and the baseboards I should be able to cover any rough openings.

2) The width - There is a piece of drywall between the door jamb and the frame on each side, is this supposed to be there? My guess is it was probably installed to shim down to the older door sizes but since I'm a bit of noob when it comes to home improvement I'm not really sure.

According to the measurements I took if I remove the top Jamb and the dry wall "shims" the door will fit but before i start ripping stuff out I'd like a second opinion.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
5230 posts
2120 upvotes
Paris
nx6288 wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 3:25 pm
Thanks! not really sure - it's this one: http://trimdepot.ca/5-panel-wood-shaker-door-slab/
Without answers to some of those questions I can have no clue if its a good deal. Like asking me if a price on a car is good and you saying "I don't know. Its blue"

That door, paintable (not wood) as a slab in 1-3/8" with no holes for knobs or hinges, as an internal door, supply only, solid core is reasonably priced.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
5230 posts
2120 upvotes
Paris
SpicYMchaggis wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 5:26 pm
Hey Guys,
Quick Question, our front closet doors broke so we bought some replacement ones over the weekend and when I went to replace them and measured the width and got some standard doors that were 80" high by 48" wide because my measurements were close enough to those numbers.

However when I went to go install these doors it looks like framed opening for the old doors were about 46" wide and 78" high meaning my door is both too wide and too tall for the opening, I ripped off the baseboards and noticed a couple things.

1) The height - w/o the door Jamb is equal to 80", I'm guessing maybe I mistake when they framed it? Can I bypass the door jamb and install the sliding doors directly to the door frame at the top? I think between the casing that holds the sliding doors and the baseboards I should be able to cover any rough openings.

2) The width - There is a piece of drywall between the door jamb and the frame on each side, is this supposed to be there? My guess is it was probably installed to shim down to the older door sizes but since I'm a bit of noob when it comes to home improvement I'm not really sure.

According to the measurements I took if I remove the top Jamb and the dry wall "shims" the door will fit but before i start ripping stuff out I'd like a second opinion.
Interior doors in older homes were either 78 or 80" You can still buy 78" doors in stores, though they usually need to be brought in.

Without seeing what you are talking about, or even the door style (accordion, sliding, traditional swing style) its hard to help. I will say that most likely you can tear out stuff like drywall if you re-trim it later. Jambs are harder to know for sure.

In my first house with my wife, I had a 5/8" drywall header with sliding glass doors. We had the carpet replaced and the doors were too high. So I removed the drywall header where I needed to install the top track and re-trimmed it. Looked fine afterward unless you looked specifically at what I had done which was honestly not the straightest drywall cut.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 12, 2006
5080 posts
764 upvotes
calgary
Jerico wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 8:52 pm
Interior doors in older homes were either 78 or 80" You can still buy 78" doors in stores, though they usually need to be brought in.

Without seeing what you are talking about, or even the door style (accordion, sliding, traditional swing style) its hard to help. I will say that most likely you can tear out stuff like drywall if you re-trim it later. Jambs are harder to know for sure.

In my first house with my wife, I had a 5/8" drywall header with sliding glass doors. We had the carpet replaced and the doors were too high. So I removed the drywall header where I needed to install the top track and re-trimmed it. Looked fine afterward unless you looked specifically at what I had done which was honestly not the straightest drywall cut.
They are sliding doors with a track that runs the length of the door at the top and bottom, if that paints a clearer picture.

I pulled out the drywall and jambs last night and as I suspect when I put it all back together with the drywall on the sides and the jambs on the top everything fits.

I guess Im just concerned about attaching the top of the sliding door directly to the stud.

I guess another option is just to pull that all out and re-frame it but that is a lot more work for what I was thinking would just be a simple door swap.

I got these doors on clearance and we really like them so they can't be returned.

Edit: Link to Door: "Fusion Plus" Sliding Door

These are the doors we got, we only paid 160$ so we are keen to keep them.
The rails at the top and the lip of the rails combined with the door moulding basically hides almost all of the rough finish, so I'm okay with it if it's just a cosmetic thing, I'm just wondering if there is another purpose for the door jamb

In terms of leveling, I think I could just adjust the height of the wheels on the bottom of the door.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
5230 posts
2120 upvotes
Paris
SpicYMchaggis wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 9:55 am
They are sliding doors with a track that runs the length of the door at the top and bottom, if that paints a clearer picture.

I pulled out the drywall and jambs last night and as I suspect when I put it all back together with the drywall on the sides and the jambs on the top everything fits.

I guess Im just concerned about attaching the top of the sliding door directly to the stud.

I guess another option is just to pull that all out and re-frame it but that is a lot more work for what I was thinking would just be a simple door swap.

I got these doors on clearance and we really like them so they can't be returned.

Edit: Link to Door: "Fusion Plus" Sliding Door

These are the doors we got, we only paid 160$ so we are keen to keep them.
The rails at the top and the lip of the rails combined with the door moulding basically hides almost all of the rough finish, so I'm okay with it if it's just a cosmetic thing, I'm just wondering if there is another purpose for the door jamb

In terms of leveling, I think I could just adjust the height of the wheels on the bottom of the door.
The stud needs to be fairly straight otherwise go for it. Similar to what I had to do years ago when the thicker carpet went in.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
Member
Apr 21, 2016
235 posts
52 upvotes
GTA
nx6288 wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 3:25 pm
Thanks! not really sure - it's this one: http://trimdepot.ca/5-panel-wood-shaker-door-slab/
Exact same door as sold by HD for $8 less. The difference is if you've made a sizing error (very common) HD will take it back, no questions asked.

Jerico, these are cheap primed, glued and frequently slightly cupped on day 1. By the looks of their website, no jambs and not drilled for hardware or routed for hinges
Member
Apr 21, 2016
235 posts
52 upvotes
GTA
SpicYMchaggis wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 9:55 am
They are sliding doors with a track that runs the length of the door at the top and bottom, if that paints a clearer picture.

I pulled out the drywall and jambs last night and as I suspect when I put it all back together with the drywall on the sides and the jambs on the top everything fits.

I guess Im just concerned about attaching the top of the sliding door directly to the stud.

I guess another option is just to pull that all out and re-frame it but that is a lot more work for what I was thinking would just be a simple door swap.

I got these doors on clearance and we really like them so they can't be returned.

Edit: Link to Door: "Fusion Plus" Sliding Door

These are the doors we got, we only paid 160$ so we are keen to keep them.
The rails at the top and the lip of the rails combined with the door moulding basically hides almost all of the rough finish, so I'm okay with it if it's just a cosmetic thing, I'm just wondering if there is another purpose for the door jamb

In terms of leveling, I think I could just adjust the height of the wheels on the bottom of the door.
For a start, nothing odd about the current framing of your current door. Back in the day, finish carpenters actually did things right. Take off the drywall top and sides but if your house is a 60's build, at most that would add exactly 3/4" if they used ceiling drywall and exactly 1/2" if they used wall drywall. I personally wouldn't worry about the side to side since very few people will notice the slight overlap.

There should be a header and possibly 1 cripple in the middle of it and if built right the header sits on a king stud. You might have to strip off the drywall at the top, remove the cripple and shim the header higher to fit. It's a most a couple of hours work and about 4 coats of mud to get it right again.
Member
Apr 21, 2016
235 posts
52 upvotes
GTA
Jerico wrote:
Nov 29th, 2018 1:08 pm


I agree there is a LOT of vinyl manufacturers with a premium price for hot garbage. And I would say as fibreglass comes down in price or more players, you will end up in the same place. Like Apple said they ever got viruses...


Personally, I dont think we have the right solution for windows in any form right now. R2-R4-R8 vs a R30 wall? I’m not sure I want to see outside that badly :)
LOL, I spend a day not that long ago untangling an Apple devotee who got a bogus ransomware. Amazing how many AV and anti-phish programs are Apple-centric these days.

Working on re-doing my basement and am building into it a hidden room office. Space has zero windows. My wife has been going on and on and on about that until I told her a: the cost of putting in a window and b: my preferred solution, 2 50" HD screens playing a continuous loop of the scenery from a window on the ORIENT Express. Much warmer...............................
Deal Fanatic
Dec 12, 2006
5080 posts
764 upvotes
calgary
missymouse wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 1:43 pm
For a start, nothing odd about the current framing of your current door. Back in the day, finish carpenters actually did things right. Take off the drywall top and sides but if your house is a 60's build, at most that would add exactly 3/4" if they used ceiling drywall and exactly 1/2" if they used wall drywall. I personally wouldn't worry about the side to side since very few people will notice the slight overlap.

There should be a header and possibly 1 cripple in the middle of it and if built right the header sits on a king stud. You might have to strip off the drywall at the top, remove the cripple and shim the header higher to fit. It's a most a couple of hours work and about 4 coats of mud to get it right again.
Oops I wasn't very clear with my initial message,

I took off the drywall on the sides and the doors fit perfectly now when I place the Jambs directly on the king studs.
If I don't do this the rails for the doors won't fit in the openings without cutting them which I really don't want to do.

The issue is the top Jamb, there is no room for it.

I could do as you said and cut out the dry wall and re-frame it, I don't think that is too difficult of a job for me.

I'm just wondering if its necessary to have the jamb at the top or if I can get away with just attaching the rails directly to the header stud.
Like I said I had my wife hold up the top rails and I put the door trim overtop and it didn't even look like it was being attached directly to the rough opening unless you went in the closet and looked.

I have very little experience with this stuff,
I'm just confused what the drywall is for, and is the Jamb just cosmetic?
Member
Apr 21, 2016
235 posts
52 upvotes
GTA
SpicYMchaggis wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 3:07 pm
Oops I wasn't very clear with my initial message,

I took off the drywall on the sides and the doors fit perfectly now when I place the Jambs directly on the king studs.
If I don't do this the rails for the doors won't fit in the openings without cutting them which I really don't want to do.

The issue is the top Jamb, there is no room for it.

I could do as you said and cut out the dry wall and re-frame it, I don't think that is too difficult of a job for me.

I'm just wondering if its necessary to have the jamb at the top or if I can get away with just attaching the rails directly to the header stud.
Like I said I had my wife hold up the top rails and I put the door trim overtop and it didn't even look like it was being attached directly to the rough opening unless you went in the closet and looked.

I have very little experience with this stuff,
I'm just confused what the drywall is for, and is the Jamb just cosmetic?
Sounds like the jamb is just cosmetic and isn't needed as is the drywall. The jamb would have been used to give the edge a finished look more than anything else but a metal drywall 45 will do the same. Sliding doors do need the track top and bottom to stay inline and NOT fall apart. Don't skip it
Newbie
Jul 22, 2009
22 posts
Scarborough
Hi all,

A few questions:
1. Wondering if some of the pro's could weigh in on what the ideal U value for double pane argon windows should be for a home in the Newmarket/Aurora, ON areas?
2. How do you determine durability / longevity of a window? I hear a lot of discussion involving things sagging, etc, but I am not sure if this is a window quality vs installation issue?
3. When there are mentions of paint chipping - which parts of the window is this in reference to, and does this have an impact on the overall efficiency of the window or is it an aesthetics issue?
4. @Jerico based on your VinylGuard suggestion I was wondering if you'd be comfortable either posting or PM'ing me with companies that sell and install this vendor's windows? I'd like to inquire more into this.

Many thanks!
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
5230 posts
2120 upvotes
Paris
missymouse wrote:
Dec 4th, 2018 1:30 pm
Exact same door as sold by HD for $8 less. The difference is if you've made a sizing error (very common) HD will take it back, no questions asked.

Jerico, these are cheap primed, glued and frequently slightly cupped on day 1. By the looks of their website, no jambs and not drilled for hardware or routed for hinges
I know them well. The insides are filled with sawdust if you take them apart. But he asked if it was an ok price and it is. I would personally buy real wood solid for around $350/door.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.

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