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  • Jan 21st, 2018 11:57 pm
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teoconca wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 1:56 pm
What is mesh internet? What are the requirements? Pros and cons vs with traditional internet.
Sounds like you are thinking it's a type of internet, it's not.. it's actually a mesh network

Typical usage of the term (a very basic one) is to describe a way of combining 2 or more wireless routers to be viewed by your devices as one.. so if you put one router upstairs and another one downstairs to cover any dead spots in your house, as you walk around your phone will seamlessly switch from one to the other without you needing to manually do so
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Oct 16, 2008
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Maple
Yeah, it is what I was thinking. Thanks.

Wonder if I need any special routers, right now I am using TP-Link Archer C8.
Eldorado wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 2:49 pm
Sounds like you are thinking it's a type of internet, it's not.. it's actually a mesh network

Typical usage of the term (a very basic one) is to describe a way of combining 2 or more wireless routers to be viewed by your devices as one.. so if you put one router upstairs and another one downstairs to cover any dead spots in your house, as you walk around your phone will seamlessly switch from one to the other without you needing to manually do so
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teoconca wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 1:56 pm
What is mesh network? What are the requirements?
Do you have dead WiFi spots in your house?
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Jul 1, 2009
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Eldorado wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 2:49 pm
Sounds like you are thinking it's a type of internet, it's not.. it's actually a mesh network

Typical usage of the term (a very basic one) is to describe a way of combining 2 or more wireless routers to be viewed by your devices as one.. so if you put one router upstairs and another one downstairs to cover any dead spots in your house, as you walk around your phone will seamlessly switch from one to the other without you needing to manually do so
That's technically incorrect. What you're describing is roaming (802.11k/r/v). It is part of the mesh networking experience, but not all of it.

Mesh networking is when the wifi network is decentralized and requires at least one access point in the network to have an actual connection to the internet for all devices to have a connection. In a traditional setup, each wireless access point (say your router) needs to have a hardwired connection to the internet. Your device (smartphone, laptop, whatever) will connect to the router, which connects to the internet.

device<...wifi...> router <----wire---> internet

If you want more wifi coverage, you need to add an additional access point and hard wire it to the first router.

device <...wifi...> access point <---wire---> router <---wire---> internet

In a mesh setup, instead of using a wire, we do it wirelessly. So if your device is connected to the second access point, the signal goes like this:

device <...wifi...> access point <...wifi...> router <---wire---> internet

In fact, you can add a bunch of access points to expand coverage without any wires, and as long as there is a path to the internet, it'll work.

Right now, you'll need specially designed "mesh wifi" routers. Although, Asus is pushing out its new AiMesh which allows certain Asus routers to work as a mesh setup.
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ghost1001 wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 5:27 pm
That's technically incorrect. What you're describing is roaming (802.11k/r/v). It is part of the mesh networking experience, but not all of it.

Mesh networking is when the wifi network is decentralized and requires at least one access point in the network to have an actual connection to the internet for all devices to have a connection. In a traditional setup, each wireless access point (say your router) needs to have a hardwired connection to the internet. Your device (smartphone, laptop, whatever) will connect to the router, which connects to the internet.

device<...wifi...> router <----wire---> internet

If you want more wifi coverage, you need to add an additional access point and hard wire it to the first router.

device <...wifi...> access point <---wire---> router <---wire---> internet

In a mesh setup, instead of using a wire, we do it wirelessly. So if your device is connected to the second access point, the signal goes like this:

device <...wifi...> access point <...wifi...> router <---wire---> internet

In fact, you can add a bunch of access points to expand coverage without any wires, and as long as there is a path to the internet, it'll work.

Right now, you'll need specially designed "mesh wifi" routers. Although, Asus is pushing out its new AiMesh which allows certain Asus routers to work as a mesh setup.
I was trying to keep my description to just a couple sentences .. as I had said, basic description of the typical usage of the 'mesh' term that many people use... you get the same idea :)
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I would say in unfinished basement and garage. On main floor, I am using wifi extender. My backyard is ok with wifi.
Gee wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 5:26 pm
Do you have dead WiFi spots in your house?
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ghost1001 wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 5:27 pm
Right now, you'll need specially designed "mesh wifi" routers. Although, Asus is pushing out its new AiMesh which allows certain Asus routers to work as a mesh setup.
Too bad their rt-n66u is not one of them. Wifi in my house sucks. I think I need a mesh setup.
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Tha DraGun wrote:
Jan 7th, 2018 2:21 pm
Too bad their rt-n66u is not one of them. Wifi in my house sucks. I think I need a mesh setup.
Mesh may or may not help. I managed to resolve most of my wifi issues by tweaking my access points and adding a single new access point. It is working better than the deco M5 did. That was mush, but very low end mesh. And what I learned from that is just because it is mesh don’t expect better results. It takes quality hardware, firmware and a bit of tweaking. The biggest problem with many mesh systems is they take away your ability to tweak, beyond physically moving the nodes. So what you get is eithe great or poor, no real middle ground.
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Oct 3, 2012
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Hamilton
When I get the T-Mobile ac68u’s I will try setting up a mesh. I am not expecting significant further improvements, but maybe it will be more fault tolerant. I am sure I will still find uses for the old routers. Like maybe I will use them as secure tunnels for some of my older hardware.
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Oct 3, 2012
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The T-Mobile Asus ac68u’s arrived yesterday. The flash to standard firmware went fairly painlessly except getter them into recovery mode. I had to use the hold down all three button technique on all of them. For one I had to keep the reset pressed for the whole flash.

AiMesh failed to recognize any nodes. Just when I was about to give-up I found the post telling me to use the cfe 1.0.2.0 US AiMesh to flash the aimesh firmware. That solved the problem...

I have never seen wireless faster than 500 Mbps before. The bad news is the wired clients in my office dropped from 1000 Mbps to 500 Mbps. The lowest wifi speed I have measured is 200 Mbps at the Washington machine.

Extreme overkill. I only hope this proves reliable...
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facebook259 wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 9:25 am
The T-Mobile Asus ac68u’s arrived yesterday. The flash to standard firmware went fairly painlessly except getter them into recovery mode. I had to use the hold down all three button technique on all of them. For one I had to keep the reset pressed for the whole flash.

AiMesh failed to recognize any nodes. Just when I was about to give-up I found the post telling me to use the cfe 1.0.2.0 US AiMesh to flash the aimesh firmware. That solved the problem...

I have never seen wireless faster than 500 Mbps before. The bad news is the wired clients in my office dropped from 1000 Mbps to 500 Mbps. The lowest wifi speed I have measured is 200 Mbps at the Washington machine.

Extreme overkill. I only hope this proves reliable...
what was your client device getting 500Mbps over wifi?

how many nodes running in your ai mesh?

Did you daisy chain them from the main gateway? or are all wired individually to the main? the first way would probably be due to load balancing if another client wired or wifi is in use. Alot like multiple clients connected to a switch between each other on the switch would be fast but anything before the switch gets divided among clients on the switch.
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Havent seen too many reviews of the Asus Aimesh in action yet. Wonder if its working well or not.
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Hamilton
lead wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 2:05 pm
what was your client device getting 500Mbps over wifi?

how many nodes running in your ai mesh?

Did you daisy chain them from the main gateway? or are all wired individually to the main? the first way would probably be due to load balancing if another client wired or wifi is in use. Alot like multiple clients connected to a switch between each other on the switch would be fast but anything before the switch gets divided among clients on the switch.
That is just my iphone 8. It seems like the mobile device I have that is capable of the fastest speeds. I have three AC68U's running. The AiMesh Node in my office is 20 feet from the AiMesh Router in a "utility closet". The AiMesh Node in the living room is almost directly one floor below the router. So it probably is not the best separation, but I just wanted to start off putting things where I have CAT6 wired today. I find the speed of the nodes don't reduce that much if I unplug the CAT6. It is the difference between 350 Mbps and 500 Mbps sitting at the same desk as the node.

I find the Mesh nodes will actually try to switch themselves to wireless backhaul even when I have them wired. But you can configure this aspect. When I get a room or two away from the nodes, the wifi speed drops below 300 Mbps. I noticed though a few random tests the upload speed dropped below 80 Mbps. It doesn't happen consistency. These are the type of issues that will take time to flush out, to see if it is an actual issue, or if it just what happens if my device happens to decide to hop to a nearer node while I'm running the test or such.
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teoconca wrote:
Jan 5th, 2018 5:47 pm
I would say in unfinished basement and garage. On main floor, I am using wifi extender. My backyard is ok with wifi.
Mesh networks are more efficient and faster than a WiFi extender. Everything is also on the same SSID. But if you're happy with your extender, there's no point with spending the money on a mesh system because you gotta replace everything you already have (more or less).

facebook259 wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 10:06 pm
I find the Mesh nodes will actually try to switch themselves to wireless backhaul even when I have them wired.
Probably your specific system - Linksys Velop seems to favour wired backhaul over wireless... it won't switch unless you pull out the wire.

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