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Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences - 2017 Admissions

  • Last Updated:
  • May 27th, 2017 5:41 pm
Newbie
May 13, 2017
7 posts
1 upvote
From those people that got an offer from Michener, when does the offer expire?
Jr. Member
Oct 28, 2015
103 posts
11 upvotes
Vancouver
woof122 wrote:
May 15th, 2017 3:27 pm
Ah gotcha. It's hard to believe that a domestically trained fully certified nuclear med technologist is having a hard time finding employment across the entirety of Canada. Things must be really rough.
I hope you do get into a med lab tech program. It's an intense program, but you learn so much about the 5 core disciplines and how indispensable MLTs are.
Yup, I picked MLT because it is a solid workhorse job with ok pay, good job market.

At the same time, I am also going to pay deposit for my other schools, just in case I didn't get in from waitlist.
Newbie
May 13, 2017
7 posts
1 upvote
MasfaT197349 wrote:
May 15th, 2017 4:21 pm
Any status updates from the UofT joint applicants?
Check your JoinID. I received an offer for Radiological Technology on Friday and my OUAC just updated today.
Newbie
Apr 28, 2017
8 posts
For those who are currently in/graduated from Respiratory Therapy at Michener, or will be starting in the fall, any thoughts on course load, clinical placements or job outlook? I've done some research, and I've read mixed things so just wanted hear some thoughts!
Newbie
Apr 16, 2017
7 posts
2 upvotes
Hey guys - let's not fight and respect each other here. Each program has its merits and challenges so we have to find that out ourselves since things are always changing. Good luck to everyone and their respective programs! :)
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 8, 2017
13 posts
2 upvotes
HannaK wrote:
May 15th, 2017 8:35 pm
When do first round offers expire and how long after do 2nd round offers start being sent out?
First round offers expire May 26th. So second round should be out shortly after that I guess.
Newbie
May 13, 2017
5 posts
Does anybody know if u accept one offer , do they remove ure name from the waitinglist of another program?
Newbie
May 14, 2017
3 posts
1 upvote
Okay, a lot of misinformed statements have been put forth about the Chiropody profession in this thread. Some true, some false.

One individual in this thread has made a number of negative assertions as to why there is only one English speaking chiropody school in Canada. Allow me to expand. The profession itself is very new (first introduced in the 1970's or 1980's) compared to other long standing fields (such as dentistry, medicine, etc.), and expansion of a new program simply does not materialise within a few decades. The US on the other hand has had the profession since the early 20th century, and paired with their proportionally larger population, the field has flourished with many reputable institutions offering podiatry programs. I am certainly not saying that Canadian chiropodists are equal in education with US podiatrists, but I am shedding some insight on the matter. Our program in Canada came about due to a growing demand of the population in need of foot care—especially given the growing senior/diabetic population. To match this demand, the college is pushing for changes to advance the profession in the direction of the US model (I will get into this later). The barriers that were mentioned (namely that of BC and AB) are indeed correct, however they will soon be abolished according to the College. It is completely nonsensical (and downright unconstitutional) to discriminate Canadian grads from working in Canadian provinces, and hire only foreign grads. Besides, not enough US podiatrists are coming to Canada to supply the demand; there are only about 25 of them in Ontario and less than 100 for the rest of the country. Quebec operates under its own jurisdiction since the school there is only french-speaking; hence I cannot comment much on that. Instead of checking outdated Wikipedia sources, I invite those who are interested to read the college reports on the new changes that are being brought forth to ministry of healthcare. They’re hundreds of pages long, but you will only find the true current state and future scope of chiropody therein.

Simply searching for "chiropody jobs" on google is a perfunctory effort at gauging the job market for a profession (particularly for professional healthcare careers). "Indeed jobs" and all those other casual job boards are seldom used by employers because of their lack of reputability and formality. Reputable Chiropody job postings are typically found on the closed-board college site, hospital boards, and established organisation sites (Ontario Society of Chiropodists, Canadian Federation of Podiatric Medicine, etc.). From what I have seen in the industry and having spoken to employers/professors, new chiropodist grads have had absolutely no trouble finding new jobs; moreover, they will often be hired by their clinical rotation sites. By their final year of chiropody, it is not uncommon for students to be privately contacted by somewhere between 1 to 4 employers for job offers. The main issue encountered is choosing, of these offers, a location/salary that suits you. The market in Toronto is not under-saturated per se, but considering that people are still opening up clinics in the downtown core, there is certainly demand all over the GTA. I know of chiropodists who have waiting lists that span months. If you're extremely money hungry and want to make 250 k +, the opportunity is certainly there, so long as you are willing to move farther from Toronto.

Another comment was made about chiropody salaries. First of all, the sunshine list posts salaries that are PUBLICLY FUNDED (i.e. taxpayer money... so those that work for hospitals, universities, the government, etc. will be on this list). Not many chiropodists work in hospitals because the pay is lower (high 50 k to 70 k ish) than working in a private practice and you don't get to call your own shots (I might add that despite the lower pay, you get health benefits and pension which is something you cannot get in private practice). The point is, many chiropodists make 6 fig's but will not be on that list simply because the majority of us are not publicly funded by tax payer money. It is correct that chiropodists do not bill for OHIP (apart from the ones that work in a hospital), however this was a decision that was pushed by the college a while back. Many years ago, chiropodists were able to bill only for OHIP, but due to monetary caps per patient, the college fought for billing to happen solely through insurance companies or straight from pocket. Dentistry took the same approach; originally they only had OHIP coverage but went for insurance instead because of the high costs of their treatment. Likewise with our profession, since treatments and orthotics can cost anywhere from 100 to 800 dollars, it is illogical to bill for OHIP if the government can only allocate less than 100 dollars per patient for coverage.

That being said, MLS, ultrasound, and all the other programs offered at Michener sound great too, and chiropody certainly is not for everyone. I am merely here to dispel and confirm some of the comments that were made earlier. For prospective students who are interested in chiropody, I'll lay down my personal two cents of the advantages and disadvantages of the profession. (see next post)
Newbie
May 14, 2017
3 posts
1 upvote
(continued chiropody post)

1) The vast majority of grads will go on to opening their own clinic. From what I've gauged from the industry, it usually takes anywhere from 3 to 8 years to do so. And no, you don't need to be stupidly wealthy beforehand to open one (those who own clinics now can attest to this). The money is good in this profession, and you'll be making enough to open a clinic within a few years; you'll likely be opening earlier if you team up with other chiropodists/healthcare professionals, which is definitely not uncommon. The real disadvantage to this is that running a clinic can be extremely stressful, and not everyone wants to be an entrepreneur. I know of a few older chiropodists who have never opened their own clinic and are happy with working at 3 different clinics throughout the week. Their combined pay is still great (6 figs), and you don't have to deal with the hassle of owning a business.

2) Flexibility of the profession is definitely a huge advantage. If you aren't incredibly money hungry and are happy with making 50 k, then you can just work part time for 3 days a week. If you want to make 6 figs, take on another part time job. It's very common for chiropodists to be working PT at multiple locations; although, the con I see in this is driving to different locations across the GTA throughout the week, which can understandably be cumbersome to some. If you want to make exuberantly HUGE bucks, the opportunity is there, you just need to move far from Toronto (again, not ideal for some but fine for others who want to get their name out there). If you love dealing with ulcers and scrubbing up/doing surgery every day, try for hospital position. If you love biomechanics, plenty of clinics specialize in that. Unfortunately, this flexibility is limited to Ontario and the provinces that you are able to practice in, but as I said earlier, this is subject to change in the coming years.

3) Because the profession is so new in Canada, a lot of changes are happening. For instance, they are removing the term “chiropody” because it is outdated and obsolete (according to the latest HPRAC update, which is a whole other story). The term “podiatrist” will replace, and those trained from the states will be known as “podiatric surgeons”. Apart from that, a lot of changes are foreseen to happen in regards to our scope of practice. One such change is allowing us to perform bone surgery (currently we are restricted to nerves and tissue) due to the high demand and exceedingly long waiting lists for bunion surgery in Ontario. Another is adding more drugs (notably opiates) to the official list that we are able to prescribe (the current list of drugs we can prescribe/inject can be found here https://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/r08338). This may be regarded as both a positive and a negative. Positive, in the sense that the curriculum and scope is expanding, but negative in that many graduated chiropodists will have to come back for retraining. Indeed, we are adequately trained in bone surgery at Michener as many of our profs are US podiatrists, but officially being able to do this requires surgical residencies to be put in place (much like the US model). So yes, it is an exciting time to be in a growing profession, but downsides are inevitable as well.

ANYWAY, I apologize deeply to the rest of the applicants here for inundating the thread with chiropody posts. A lot of people have been wondering about the profession so I feel it's best to shed some light in this forum. Good luck to the rest of you, and warm wishes for your future endeavours on whatever program you choose!
Newbie
Apr 16, 2017
8 posts
1 upvote
I'm curious. For people who are rejected/waitlisted for Michener, what are your back up plans??
Newbie
May 14, 2017
3 posts
MasfaT197349 wrote:
May 15th, 2017 4:21 pm
Any status updates from the UofT joint applicants?
For all those that are waiting on UofT joint application, it's best to check the undergraduate application portal as others have mentioned. I have yet to receive an email about an offer of admission, but the front page of the portal says "admitted" underneath the status column, which I believe was screen shotted and uploaded by another user. I checked OUAC today and noticed that they updated the choice/offers page & my offer was there. I'm assuming the first round of offers are out & another wave will be sent after the offer expires. If I can recall correctly, the expiration was May 25th for myself. Hopefully this helps anyone who is waiting for the UofT/Michener offers!
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